eldritchhobbit: (Default)


My latest “Looking Back on Genre History” is up on StarShipSofa, and it’s an update on Native American Science Fiction/Indigenous Futurism. Listen for free here!

(The earlier segment I did introducing this topic in 2011 is here.)



Here are some of the links I mention in my new segment.

Apex Magazine’s “Celebration of Indigenous American Fantasists”

Strange Horizon’s Roundtable on Indigenous Futurism

Extrapolation’s Issue on Indigenous Futurism 

A Tribe Called Geek

Indigenous Comic Con 

eldritchhobbit: (Default)


Happy birthday to Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (30 August, 1797 –
1 February, 1851)!


“Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it.”
- Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818)


eldritchhobbit: (Default)
As guest editor, I am beyond thrilled to share this issue with readers. The amazing works assembled here represent Cherokee, Muscogee (Creek), Seminole, Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo, Mushkegowuk Cree, Karuk, and Ojibwe Nakawē perspectives. Please check out issue 99 and its related podcast here.


ALL OF THIS ISSUE’S CONTENT IS NOW UNLOCKED AND FREE TO READERS!

eldritchhobbit: (Default)

I’ve been quiet, because work has kept me very, very busy this summer. But I wanted to be sure you knew that my annual month-long Halloween Countdown will be back this year. I’m looking forward to it, and I hope you’ll join me.

eldritchhobbit: (Default)

As guest editor, I am beyond thrilled to share this issue with readers. This project has been a year in the making! The amazing works assembled here represent Cherokee, Muscogee (Creek), Seminole, Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo, Mushkegowuk Cree, Karuk, and Ojibwe Nakawē perspectives. The stories are outstanding! Please check out issue 99 and its related podcast here.


eldritchhobbit: (books/old)


Happy birthday to Emily Brontë (30 July, 1818 – 19 December, 1848)!

image

“Heaven did not seem to be my home; and I broke my heart with weeping to come back to earth; and the angels were so angry that they flung me out into the middle of the heath on the top of Wuthering Heights; where I woke sobbing for joy.”
- Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights (1847)


eldritchhobbit: (Default)

I’m looking forward to being a literary/scholarly guest this weekend at ConGregate 4/DeepSouthCon 55!

I’ll be on several panels and wearing my moderator hat. Here is my schedule.

image

JULY 14 • FRIDAY

5:00pm – 5:50pm: Writing in Multiple Tie-In Universes 

Moderator: Amy H. Sturgis

Guests: Alexandra Christian, Barbara Hambly, Melissa McArthur, Richard C.

Our panelists have written official novels for Star Wars, Star Trek, and Beauty and the Beast, as well as Sherlock Holmes pastiches. Given that they also write a lot of other fiction, the panelists discuss the differences between writing original fiction and writing for pre-existing franchises/worlds.

6:00pm – 6:50pm: Writing Sherlock Holmes and Other Icons

Moderator: Amy H. Sturgis

Guests: Nicole Givens Kurtz, Misty Massey, Melissa McArthur, J. Matthew Saunders

Sherlock Holmes, James Bond, Superheroes… What are the challenges with writing these iconic characters? And if you change them, how do you make sure to capture their essence? When writing an iconic character, how do you determine what makes them iconic?  Is it Sherlock Holmes being a detective, or Bond working for MI-6?  What happens if Holmes is a demon, or Bond is set in a fantasy world?

JULY 15 • SATURDAY

9:30am – 10:20am: Mixing Historical Research with Genre Fiction 

Moderator: Amy H. Sturgis

Guests: Barbara Hambly, Kim Headlee, Tally Johnson, Linda Robertson

Given that historical fiction itself is a demanding genre requiring a lot of effort if one wants to do it right, our panelists discuss the challenges they’ve faced and choices they’ve made in blending historical work with the fantasy and mystery genres.

1:00pm – 1:50pm: Writing from Different Perspectives

Moderator: Amy H. Sturgis

Guests: Samantha Dunaway Bryant, Barbara Hambly, Larry N. Martin, Michael G. Williams

Authors often try to write about protagonists who are different from themselves. Our panelists discuss why they feel it is important to capture these characters’ perspectives; the challenges faced in trying to be authentic, respectful, and sensitive in their portrayal; and what they think about current debates and controversies about the importance of diversity, authenticity, and representation in fiction.

eldritchhobbit: (books/old)
Happy birthday to the mother of the Gothic, Ann Radcliffe (9 July, 1764 – 7 February, 1823).


“A well-informed mind is the best security against the contagion of folly and vice. The vacant mind is ever on the watch for relief, and ready to plunge into error, to escape from the languor of idleness. Store it with ideas, teach it the pleasure of thinking; and the temptations of the world without, will be counteracted by the gratifications derived from the world within.”
― Ann Radcliffe, The Mysteries of Udolpho (1794)

image







Nailed It

Jul. 5th, 2017 08:33 am
eldritchhobbit: (Reanimator/Read More Lovecraft)


My eldritch Lovecraftian manicure: it had to happen. Sanity not included. 

eldritchhobbit: (Ravenclaw/Deep)


It’s difficult to believe it’s been two decades.

For me personally, it’s also been seven articles published and nearly fifteen years of undergraduate and graduate courses taught about the Wizarding World. What a trip it’s been.

Happy birthday, Harry Potter.

eldritchhobbit: (Default)


Happy birthday to George Orwell (25 June, 1903 – 21 January, 1950)!

image


“Perhaps a lunatic was simply a minority of one.”
― George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)


eldritchhobbit: (Me/Sparkly)
My latest science fiction narration is up on the new episode of Escape Pod: the beautiful story “That Game We Played During the War” by Carrie Vaughn. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

EP581: That Game We Played During the War: Escape Pod
eldritchhobbit: (Read More SF)
Happy birthday to Octavia Butler (22 June, 1947 – 24 February, 2006)!

“Beware:
Ignorance
Protects itself.
Ignorance
Promotes suspicion.
Suspicion
Engenders fear.
Fear quails,
Irrational and blind,
Or fear looms,
Defiant and closed.
Blind, closed,
Suspicious, afraid,
Ignorance
Protects itself,
And protected,
Ignorance grows.”

― Octavia E. Butler, Parable of the Talents (1998)


eldritchhobbit: (SW/BB-8)
My mother is the best.

Look who she just made for me!

(Rey’s hair beneath her removable cap is the the cutest thing ever, but I love the goggles so much I had to leave it on for this photo.)


Now they can join the rest of the gang!

May the Force be with you!

eldritchhobbit: (SW/Obi-Wan/Not Defeat)
My latest “Looking Back at Genre History” is up on the new episode of the StarShipSofa podcast. It’s a standalone piece, but it also serves as a follow up to my recent interview on the My Star Wars Story podcast. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

eldritchhobbit: (Millennium)

I can’t believe it’s been forty years.

On June 13, 1977, a terrible crime rocked the world that I knew. Three young Girl Scouts from my hometown area were found murdered outside of their tent at the Girl Scout property Camp Scott near Locust Grove, Oklahoma.

It hit very close to home for me not only geographically, but for a variety of reasons, and it continues to be an unsolved case and an unhealed wound in my home state. I didn’t want to let this anniversary pass without observing it.

I didn’t want today to go by without saying the names of these beloved girls:
Lori Lee Farmer (age 8), Doris Denise Milner (age 10), and Michelle Heather Guse (age 9).

The case was complicated by racial/ethnic tensions, because the victims were white and black, and the only official suspect, Gene Leroy Hart, was Cherokee. After a complicated and dramatic manhunt, Hart was tried but eventually found innocent. (Recent DNA tests proved inconclusive.) Since then, the case has remained unsolved, the fodder for local legends, suggestions of bizarre occult and ritual connections, and various conspiracy theories. The Girl Scout camp remains closed to this day.

For more information:

* The Tulsa World just published a six-part series on the murders here: “40 years ago, the murders of three Girl Scouts in Oklahoma stunned the nation, created shockwaves still being felt.”

There’s also an audio version here.* Episode 169 of the Generation Why Podcast offers a thoughtful and detailed discussion of the murders and the subsequent investigation.

* The most famous book on the case remains Someone Cry for the Children: The Unsolved Girl Scout Murders of Oklahoma and the Case of Gene Leroy Hart by Michael and Dick Wilkerson.

* Photos of the abandoned site are posted here at AbandonedOK.

* The long-rumored movie supposedly designed to name an alternative murder suspect, Candles, is currently listed at IMDB as filming for 2017 release, but I remain skeptical that it will happen. It’s been listed as in pre-production/production for six years now, and each year the release date is updated.

Never forgotten.

eldritchhobbit: (Default)

I just finished watching the 2015 documentary Mifune: The Last Samurai by Oscar-winning director Steven Okazaki (streaming on Netflix). It’s very, very much worth watching. Two thumbs up.

I’m a fan of both Toshiro Mifune’s and Akira Kurosawa’s – I’ve just pulled Throne of Blood, Sanjuro, and Yojimbo from my DVD collection for rewatching – and I got a lot out of this film. But even if you’re unfamiliar with this incomparable, iconic actor, I’d recommend the documentary. It’s very accessible, and it provides great context. Without Mifune, there would have been no Magnificent Seven, no Clint Eastwood as a Man with No Name, no Star Wars.

As you may know, Mifune was George Lucas’s first choice to portray Obi-Wan Kenobi. As much as I dearly love Alec Guinness, I still ask myself, “What if?”

eldritchhobbit: (SW/Qui-Gon/What You Cannot)

I’ve been thinking about indie documentaries related to Star Wars – that is, documentaries above and beyond those “making of” and “behind the scenes” documentaries available with various versions of the DVDs, my favorite of which is Empire of Dreams from 2004, or channel-specific televised specials, such as ESPN's Star Wars: Evolution of a Lightsaber Duel from 2015, which my students love – that I find enjoyable/useful.

Here are the ones that come to mind:

* Looking for Leia (in production, Kickstarter in progress)

* Elstree 1979 (in production)

* The Prequels Strike Back: A Fan’s Journey (2016)

* Elstree 1976 (2015)

* I Am Your Father (2015)

* Plastic Galaxy: The Story of Star Wars Toys (2014)

* The People vs. George Lucas (2010)

* A Galaxy Far, Far Away (2001) 

Any recommendations for others? Thanks! 

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Tags

Page generated Sep. 21st, 2017 07:17 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios