eldritchhobbit: (Headstone)
I am delighted to share the book trailer for Elevator #1 from Hocus Pocus Comics!

eldritchhobbit: (Rogue One/Baze smiling)
It's time for my annual navel-gazing post, in which I take stock of the year beyond my university teaching for my own information/edification.

So here's my reading, podcasting, and published work this year.





Below the cut: lists! )
eldritchhobbit: (Books and coffee)
I'm delighted to announce that I've accepted an invitation to guest edit an issue of Apex Magazine (scheduled for August 2017). I will be soliciting new stories that showcase the rich depth and diversity of science fiction, fantasy, and horror penned by Native American/First Nations authors. Apex Magazine routinely provides 12,000 words of original fiction per issue, but my special issue will deliver 20,000.

My long relationship with Apex dates back to the fourth issue (Winter 2005) of its print-edition days, when it was Apex Digest. It is with the greatest excitement that I look forward to this important project.

If you have questions or recommendations, you are welcome to contact me via my website.

eldritchhobbit: (Knight)
Recently Gary Dowell, editor of the wonderful Far Fetched Fables: The Audio Fantasy Fiction Magazine (sibling to StarShipSofa), invited me to contribute a fantasy-related "Looking Back on Genre History" to his podcast. It occurred to me that this was the perfect opportunity to share with everyone an almost-but-not-quite-lost work of epic Gothic fantasy: 1877's The Demon of Brockenheim; or The Enchanted Ring.

Today the second part of my two two-part introduction to The Demon of Brockenheim was posted on Far Fetched Fables. You can listen to both parts for free below.
* My Introduction to The Demon of Brockenheim, Part 1
* My Introduction to The Demon of Brockenheim, Part 2

And here for your reading pleasure is a free PDF of the novel from its publication in serial form in The Australian Journal: download The Demon of Brockenheim.

Happy listening and happy reading!



If you'd like to get your genre geek on a bit more, here are some suggestions.

Bibliography/Recommended Further Reading Related to My Demon of Brockenheim "Looking Back" Segments
- Anonymous. The Saga of the Volsungs. Jesse Byock, ed. Penguin Classics, 2000.
- Doig, James, ed. Australian Gothic : An Anthology of Australian Supernatural Fiction, 1867-1939. Equilibrium Books, 2007.
- Ellis, Markman. The History of Gothic Fiction. Edinburgh University Press, 2001.
- Fouqué, Baron de la Motte. The Magic Ring. Amy H. Sturgis, ed. Valancourt Books, 2006.
- Gelder, Kenneth and Rachael Weaver, eds. The Anthology of Colonial Australian Gothic Fiction. Melbourne University Press, 2007.
- Johnson-Woods, Toni. Beyond Ephemera: The Australian Journal (1865-1962) as Fiction Publisher. Diss. University of Queensland, 2000.
- Punter. David. The Literature of Terror: A History of Gothic Fictions from 1765 to the Present Day. Volume I: The Gothic Tradition. Longmans, 1980.
- Punter, David and Glennis Byron. The Gothic. Blackwell, 2004.
- Thomsett, Michael T. The Inquisition: A History. McFarland, 2010.
- Tolkien, J.R.R. The Lord of the Rings. Allen & Unwin. 1954, 1955.
- Yates, Frances A. The Rosicrucian Enlightenment. Routledge, 2001.
eldritchhobbit: (Knight)
Recently Gary Dowell, editor of the wonderful Far Fetched Fables: The Audio Fantasy Fiction Magazine (sibling to StarShipSofa), invited me to contribute a fantasy-related "Looking Back on Genre History" to his podcast. It occurred to me that this was the perfect opportunity to share with everyone an almost-but-not-quite-lost work of epic Gothic fantasy: 1877's The Demon of Brockenheim; or The Enchanted Ring.

You can hear Part 1 of my two-part introduction to The Demon of Brockenheim here for free on Far Fetched Fables. Part 2 will be available next week, and I will post the link when it is.

And here for your reading pleasure is a free PDF of the novel from its publication in serial form in The Australian Journal: download The Demon of Brockenheim.

Happy listening and happy reading!



If you'd like to get your genre geek on a bit more, here are some suggestions.

Bibliography/Recommended Further Reading Related to My Demon of Brockenheim "Looking Back" Segments
- Anonymous. The Saga of the Volsungs. Jesse Byock, ed. Penguin Classics, 2000.
- Doig, James, ed. Australian Gothic : An Anthology of Australian Supernatural Fiction, 1867-1939. Equilibrium Books, 2007.
- Ellis, Markman. The History of Gothic Fiction. Edinburgh University Press, 2001.
- Fouqué, Baron de la Motte. The Magic Ring. Amy H. Sturgis, ed. Valancourt Books, 2006.
- Gelder, Kenneth and Rachael Weaver, eds. The Anthology of Colonial Australian Gothic Fiction. Melbourne University Press, 2007.
- Johnson-Woods, Toni. Beyond Ephemera: The Australian Journal (1865-1962) as Fiction Publisher. Diss. University of Queensland, 2000.
- Punter. David. The Literature of Terror: A History of Gothic Fictions from 1765 to the Present Day. Volume I: The Gothic Tradition. Longmans, 1980.
- Punter, David and Glennis Byron. The Gothic. Blackwell, 2004.
- Thomsett, Michael T. The Inquisition: A History. McFarland, 2010.
- Tolkien, J.R.R. The Lord of the Rings. Allen & Unwin. 1954, 1955.
- Yates, Frances A. The Rosicrucian Enlightenment. Routledge, 2001.
eldritchhobbit: (LOTR/Secret Gate)
I first met artist Jef Murray over a decade ago when we were both guests at the Tolkien event The Gathering of the Fellowship in Toronto. I most recently spent some wonderful time chatting with Jef and his lovely wife Lorraine last year when we were guests at A Long-Expected Party 3 in Kentucky. In between conventions and conferences, we kept in touch. His artwork delighted me, and I was thrilled when he offered to illustrate the deluxe hardback version of my edited edition of The Magic Ring by Baron de la Motte Fouqué. He shared his breathtaking art-in-progress with me as he worked (the book contains more than forty of his gorgeous illustrations), I shared my annotated music mix for the project with him, and the experience was a true joy.

The Magic Ring - Illustrated


If you're unfamiliar with Jef's remarkable art, do check out the website of Jef Murray Studios.

I was looking forward to seeing Jef again next year in Kentucky. The news of his sudden passing saddens me greatly. He was a rare soul and a truly gifted artist, and he brought beauty to everyone who knew him. Namárië, Jef.

Happy May!

May. 1st, 2015 07:04 am
eldritchhobbit: (Excalibur/Arthur)
Here are some Calls for Papers that may be of interest:
- Special Issue of the Journal of Popular Film and Television on Sherlock Holmes Onscreen
- Monstrous Moral Messengers: Supernatural Figures in Children’s Picture Books & Early Readings
- Monsters, Demons and the Jewish Fantastic
- Journal of Dracula Studies

Here is some of the oldest film of London still in existence, including amazing old footage plus modern shots of the same locations today. This also features maps carefully researched to show where the camera was during different takes.



Happy early birthday wishes to [livejournal.com profile] angelinehawkes, [livejournal.com profile] idwoman, [livejournal.com profile] pseudoanorexic, [livejournal.com profile] vyrdolak, [livejournal.com profile] lyria_theringer, [livejournal.com profile] bistokidsfan77, [livejournal.com profile] catw, [livejournal.com profile] dragonrose1125, [livejournal.com profile] dduane, [livejournal.com profile] lexie_marie, [livejournal.com profile] jalara, [livejournal.com profile] theladyrose, [livejournal.com profile] elvenjoy, [livejournal.com profile] jan_u_wine, [livejournal.com profile] gondoriangirl, [livejournal.com profile] vivien529, and [livejournal.com profile] senket. May each of you enjoy many happy returns of the day!
eldritchhobbit: (Elsewhere)
* If 1) while reading C.S. Lewis you've ever been troubled by the problem of Susan Pevensie, and/or 2) you love Doctor Who, by all means read "The Solution of Susan." In less than half a page, it packs more of a punch than some novels I've read. Thank you, The Hero of Three Faces.

* In other news, my most recent "Looking Back into Genre History" segment is up on the latest episode of StarShipSofa, and in it I discuss the great Ada Lovelace. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

* My inspiration for this episode is a new book for middle readers that I highly recommend to young and old alike.

wollstonecraft


In The Case of the Missing Moonstone (Wollstonecraft Detective Agency #1), Jordan Stratford brings together the mother of modern science fiction, Mary Shelley, and the world's first computer programmer, Ada Lovelace, as girls (14 and 11, respectively). In honor of the feminist writings of Mary's late mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, the two create the Wollstonecraft Detective Agency. They use science to solve the mystery of the missing moonstone. There is so much to love here: clever dialogue, evocative description, action, and intelligent young women using their reason.

For young readers, the novel serves as an introduction of sorts to the intellectual history of the Victorian era; for those who are already in the know, the inside jokes and loving homages are a treat. The mystery is a retelling of The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins, the first great detective novel in English. Percy B. Shelley and Charles Dickens play key roles in the tale, as do mesmerism and Newgate Prison.

The book ends with a discussion of the real history behind Ada, Mary, Wollstonecraft, The Moonstone, and the other ingredients of the story, and Stratford makes it clear when and why he's taken liberties with the past (for example, in narrowing the real gap between the ages of his protagonists so they have the chance to be young heroines together).

This is a perfect storm of inspiration, entertainment, and education. I'm already making plans to put a copy of this book into the hands of the young readers I know.

Miscellany

Nov. 10th, 2014 09:56 am
eldritchhobbit: (Star Wars/Obi-Wan/Not Defeat)
* Huge congratulations to Glass Hammer's Stephen R. Babb on the publication of his gorgeous The Lay of Lirazel in paperback, ebook, and audiobook form. The Lay Of Lirazel is narrative poetry told in epic fashion, but it is poetry fully equipped with fangs and enough terror to keep a reader turning pages till the last curse falls and death and doom claim their prize! Inspired by the poetry of Alfred Lord Tennyson, the paintings of John W. Waterhouse, and the writings of George MacDonald, William Morris, and Lord Dunsany, The Lay of Lirazel is the essence of the mythopoeic set to verse. I'm proud to have written the foreword for this remarkable work. Highly recommended!

screen-shot-2014-10-07-at-4-14-57-pm


* I'll be offering a two-weekend-long intense lecture series called "The Dystopian Tradition: What Worlds Gone Wrong Can Teach Us" in Spring 2015 in Asheville, NC (minutes from where much of The Hunger Games was filmed). Accepted undergraduate/graduate students will have hotel and meals provided without cost. Interested students may apply here.

* Sean Pertwee's Halloween costume made me go all mushy inside. (Incidentally, he's my favorite thing about Gotham, and there's a lot to love about that show.)

* So Star Wars Episode VII will be The Force Awakens. I didn't realize that the Force had dozed off. That said, I hope the latest speculations have some truth to them. If so, it could be good, even great. (Anthony Daniels certainly seems pleased with it.)

What do u think? Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens #starwars #disney


* I was very sorry to hear of the passing of Elizabeth Peña. She starred in a film I dearly love, Lone Star, and several other great ones (Jacob's Ladder, anyone?). So sad.

* I'm looking forward to Billy Boyd's "The Last Goodbye" for The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies. (We can hear a clip now here and via iTunes.)

Have a great day!
eldritchhobbit: (HP/Snape/Tori)
This week's StarShipSofa includes the second installment of my three-part "History of the Genre" special about reading Harry Potter in a Native American context. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!
Part 1 is here on Episode 340
Part 2 is here on Episode 345
A complete list of links for my podcasting work to date is available here.

In other news, I have a newsprint manicure and a book, and I took a photo of them. So there.

A good book and a good manicure
eldritchhobbit: (Sherlock/NRK parody murder by death)
Good news! "Sherlock Returns for One-Off Special AND Series 4."

And here are a couple of other nifty things that may be of interest. (Thanks to Michael!)

- Living with Frankenstein, a web series: "Frankenstein’s Monster (aka Frank) is alive and living in Los Angeles with Mary Shelley, P.B. Shelley, and Lord Byron. In this dark comedy the Monster is not a fictional character. P.B. Shelley created Frank, and Mary Shelley wrote the novel Frankenstein to chronicle actual events." Check it out here and here.

- Finding Hogwarts: This is a documentary film about seven Harry Potter fans and their journey to find Hogwarts, as well as the stories and shared experiences they had as they followed Harry until the very end. More details are here.



Last but not least, happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] lynn_maudlin, and happy early birthday wishes to [livejournal.com profile] morningapproach, [livejournal.com profile] gods_lil_rocker, [livejournal.com profile] splix, [livejournal.com profile] divadiane1, [livejournal.com profile] markbourne, [livejournal.com profile] sunshinedew, [livejournal.com profile] ithildyn, [livejournal.com profile] melissagay, [livejournal.com profile] faramirgirl, [livejournal.com profile] agentxpndble, [livejournal.com profile] arymetore, [livejournal.com profile] caster121, [livejournal.com profile] syrcleoftrees, [livejournal.com profile] ghislainem70, and [livejournal.com profile] johnjosephadams. May you all enjoy many happy returns of the day!
eldritchhobbit: (LOTR/Emo Hobbit)
Just a quick fly-by post...

This is worth reading: "J.R.R. Tolkien Has A Touching Message For His Former Teachers In Newly Discovered Letter."

This also deserves a look: from NPR, "Harry Potter And The Forbidden Books."

J.R.R. Tolkien's dust jacket painting for The Hobbit
eldritchhobbit: (Excalibur/Arthur)
* R.I.P., Mary Stewart (17 September, 1916 – 9 May, 2014), best known for her Merlin series of Arthurian fantasy novels: Mythopoeic Award winners The Crystal Cave (1970) and The Hollow Hills (1973), followed by The Last Enchantment. Read more from The New York Times: "Mary Stewart, British Writer Who Spanned Genres, Dies at 97."

* Is Tolkien's translation of Beowulf better than Seamus Heaney's? From Katy Waldman at Slate: "The Don’s Don: J.R.R. Tolkien’s Beowulf translation finally arrives."

* I should mention again that scholar Michael Drout has written a most enlightening blog post clarifying his work with Tolkien's Beowulf papers, etc.: "Tolkien's Beowulf: The Real Story."


And here's some amazing street art, a tribute to The Professionals.

The Professionals ~ Gatecrasher Fence
eldritchhobbit: (Space/Jupiter)
Things that are cool:

* Scholar Michael Drout has written a most enlightening blog post clarifying his work with Tolkien's Beowulf papers, etc.: "Tolkien's Beowulf: The Real Story."

* From US Weekly: "J.K. Rowling to Pen Fantastic Beasts Trilogy as Harry Potter Spin-Off."

* From The Guardian: "Black death was not spread by rat fleas, say researchers."

* The Heinlein Society is pleased to announce its third annual scholarship essay contest for the 2014-2015 academic year. The scholarships will be awarded to undergraduate students of accredited 4-year colleges and universities majoring in engineering, math, or physical sciences (e.g. physics, chemistry), or in science fiction as literature. Here are more details.

* From Muskrat Magazine: "Indigenizing Sci Fi" by Zainab Amadahy. This is a three-part study of how science fiction/fantasy con organizers everywhere might grow and diversify their events. I'm honored to be mentioned in this piece.

* My dear friend Tony C. Smith has opened a new shop, SeaDriftSoaps. If you're after soap that is natural, unscented, cruelty-free, and handmade, check it out!

* I'll be offering my two-semester history of science fiction with Mythgard Institute again this Fall (2014) and Spring (2015). Consider yourself invited to a free online Q&A session on June 5 for more information! (Note: I'll post a reminder closer to time. Another session timed for UK convenience will take place later this summer, and I'll post about that, as well.)



Last but definitely not least, happy early birthday wishes to [livejournal.com profile] sarah531, [livejournal.com profile] vg_ford, [livejournal.com profile] tunes84, [livejournal.com profile] captnofmyheart, [livejournal.com profile] wildviolet4, [livejournal.com profile] savagedoc45, [livejournal.com profile] lalam, [livejournal.com profile] silveraspen, [livejournal.com profile] denorios, [livejournal.com profile] prettybirdy979, [livejournal.com profile] sakuraember, [livejournal.com profile] cherylmmorgan, [livejournal.com profile] muuranker, [livejournal.com profile] izhilzha, and [livejournal.com profile] justicemuffins. May you enjoy many happy returns of the day, my friends!
eldritchhobbit: (fairytales)
Just a quick post to say I'm not dead, I'm simply working very hard at the moment.

A few quick items:

* My latest unabridged narration for StarShipSofa, which is of Mary Soon Lee's powerful short story "Pause Time," is now available to stream or download on the newest episode of the podcast, which is a themed episode celebrating Mother's Day in the UK. If you listen, I hope you enjoy. (A full list of links to my unabridged dramatic readings is here.)

* Award-winning author Sherman Alexie, whose works (such as the film Smoke Signals and novel The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian) I regularly teach, is speaking tonight at Lenoir-Rhyne University. I'll be conducting an hour-long, one-on-one interview with him tomorrow for the campus community. Very exciting!

* I have the best students in the universe. The absolute best.

Nostalgia alert! I recently found a YouTube recording that captures one of my earliest memories of "reading" by myself. My parents gave me the Rocking Horse Records book and 45 LP of Thumbelina. I memorized the narration and songs and then followed along in the booklet. I was perhaps, what, three or four? Something like that. I can't believe I still remember all of the lyrics to "Sleep Well, My Pretty Little Bird" perfectly. Ha! (Spoiler: The swallow isn't really dead!)

This, my friends, kicks it old school.

eldritchhobbit: (illuminated manuscript)
As you know, the devastating tornadoes in Oklahoma earlier this year hit very close to home for me, as in fact they hit the counties (turned "national disaster areas") where my parents and my sister and her family live. Efforts continue to rebuild and recover.

I am thrilled to be a part of the new Writers for Relief: An Anthology Written by Fantasy's Finest to Benefit Those Who Suffered in Oklahoma, edited by Davey Beauchamp and Stuart Jaffe. All proceeds benefit the ongoing recovery efforts related to the Oklahoma tornado disasters. This collection includes cover art from the legendary Bob Eggleton and fiction from some of the finest in the genre, including Kevin J. Anderson, Mike Resnick, Ben Bova, Todd McCaffrey, Stephen Euin Cobb, Jason Sandford, Bobby Nash, John Hartness, Edmund Schubert, Danny Birt, Jaym Gates, Gray Rinehart, Janine Spendlove, and Eugie Foster. Oh, and I'm in there, too! :)

Writers for Relief cover art


Hey, this would make a great gift, wouldn't it? And it's almost time for the holidays! I'd be grateful if you'd help us spread the word. Thanks so much!

Writers for Relief 3 flyer

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