eldritchhobbit: (Frankenstein)
First of all, happy 199th birthday to what is perhaps my favorite novel and definitely the pioneering work of modern science fiction, Frankenstein! Here are five reasons to celebrate Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley today.



Also, the latest episode of StarShipSofa includes my new "Looking Back on Genre History," part one of a two-part discussion of the relationship of one of my very favorite authors, Lois McMaster Bujold, to fandom (and fan fiction, in particular). Here it is! If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

(And speaking of StarShipSofa, heartfelt thanks to those of you who have helped make Everyone: Worlds Without Walls a reality! We're most grateful to you!)

Last but not least, it seems that I've embarked on an in-depth study of the films of award-winning actor-director-writer Jiang Wen, sort of a personal (and multi-month-long) film festival that also includes reading the popular and scholarly analyses of his work that are available in English. (I've found that his films are kind of dream dining for someone who does intellectual history, though I'm having to brush up a bit on my knowledge of recent China, which, hey, is a good thing.) When that's all done, expect a report, including breakdown of his films with brief reviews/reactions. Consider yourself warned, ha!



I am still recovering from The Ick That Wouldn't Die, but I'm much better than I was. And we're expecting snow tomorrow, which makes me very happy indeed. I hope all of you are doing well, my friends!
eldritchhobbit: (Frankenstein)
Once again for this Halloween season, starting on October 25, National Theatre Live is offering encore performances of the brilliant Frankenstein (play by Nick Dear, directed by Danny Boyle, with Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller alternating the roles of the Creature and Frankenstein) in cinemas. To see if there's a venue near you worldwide, check the official website. I can't recommend this play highly enough.

Here is the original trailer for the play.



I have seen the performances several times. My reviews are below.

* These are my initial impressions of the Cumberbatch-as-Creature cast, including comparisons between Nick Dear's play as written and as performed.

* Here are my thoughts on the differences between the Cumberbatch-as-Creature and Miller-as-Creature casts.

Frankenstein6


Check out Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blog for all things related to all versions of Frankenstein!


"Paradise Lost excited different and far deeper emotions. I read it, as I had read the other volumes which had fallen into my hands, as a true history. It moved every feeling of wonder and awe that the picture of an omnipotent God warring with his creatures was capable of exciting. I often referred the several situations, as their similarity struck me, to my own. Like Adam, I was apparently united by no link to any other being in existence; but his state was far different from mine in every other respect. He had come forth from the hands of God a perfect creature, happy and prosperous, guarded by the especial care of his Creator; he was allowed to converse with and acquire knowledge from beings of a superior nature, but I was wretched, helpless, and alone."
- Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus

"All I wanted was your love. I could have loved you with all my heart. My poor creator."
- The Creature to Victor Frankenstein, Nick Dear's Frankenstein

Frankenstein14
eldritchhobbit: (Tori/I was here)
It's time for my year-end review post.

Apologies for being quiet of late. I've been dealing with both shingles and sinus-related nastiness for which surgery looms in 2016. Ick. I do hope your holiday season has been more enjoyable!

But back to taking stock of 2015...



What I Published in 2015

In Books

* “Seeking Dumbledore’s Mother: Harry Potter in the Native American Context” in Harry Potter for Nerds II, Kathryn McDaniel and Travis Prinzi, eds.

* “Harry Potter and the Dystopia After Tomorrow” in Ravenclaw Reader: Seeking the Artistry and Meaning of J.K. Rowling’s Hogwarts Saga, The St. Andrews University Harry Potter Conference, John Patrick Pazdziora and Micah Snell, eds.

* [Note: Also written in 2015 and accepted for 2016 publication: “His Fordship in the Capitol and Big Brother in the Districts: The Hunger Games and the Modern Dystopian Tradition” in Critical Insights: The Hunger Games, Lana A. Whited, ed., Grey House/Salem Press, forthcoming in 2016]

In Reason Magazine

*“Star Wars, Remixed: George Lucas’ Universe Is a Mashup Masterwork,” Reason (January 2016) online here

* “The Many Resurrections of Sherlock Holmes: Why the Great Detective Is Always in Fashion,” Reason (October 2015) online here

* “Feminism, Frankenstein, and Freedom: The Individualistic Works and Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley,” Reason (June 2015) online here


What I Read in 2015
What I Read in 2015 )
eldritchhobbit: (Frankenstein)
Happy birthday to Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (30 August, 1797 – 1 February, 1851)!

Portrait of Mary Shelley


“Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it.”
- Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818)


Happy early birthday also to [livejournal.com profile] aragornlover, [livejournal.com profile] alii_s, [livejournal.com profile] beatonna, [livejournal.com profile] agameofthree, [livejournal.com profile] nowitsdark0, [livejournal.com profile] ekeppich, [livejournal.com profile] jinxed_wood, [livejournal.com profile] princeofcairo, [livejournal.com profile] chickenfried_jo, [livejournal.com profile] llembas, [livejournal.com profile] soonerwxgirl, [livejournal.com profile] delenn1960, [livejournal.com profile] sueworld2003, [livejournal.com profile] shagungu, [livejournal.com profile] xanath, [livejournal.com profile] northwestmagpie, [livejournal.com profile] curtana, [livejournal.com profile] sneakybea, [livejournal.com profile] litlover12, and [livejournal.com profile] mrua7. May you enjoy many happy returns of the day!
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Walter/Strawberry death)
Just a quick note to say that my essay "In Search of Fringe's Literary Ancestors" from the book Fringe Science is the spotlight essay today at the Smart Pop Books website. You can read it for free here!
eldritchhobbit: (Elsewhere)
Wow! The first weekend of my two-weekend "The Dystopian Tradition: What Worlds Gone Wrong Can Teach Us" event was spectacular, with amazing students and fascinating discussions. I'm very much looking forward to the second half of the event. Thanks to everyone who participated!

In other news that makes me happy, I've just proofed the final galleys for two of my essays which will be published soon. “Feminism, Frankenstein, and Freedom: The Individualistic Works and Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley” will appear in REASON, and "Seeking Dumbledore's Mother: Harry Potter in the Native American Context" will appear in Harry Potter for Nerds II (along with works by several of my current and former graduate students, I'm delighted to say).

In addition, my proposal for the essay "His Fordship in the Capitol and Big Brother in the Districts: The Hunger Games and the Modern Dystopian Tradition" has been accepted for the forthcoming 2016 scholarly volume Critical Insights: The Hunger Games.

Day 38/365 ~ We Read to Know We Are Not Alone


Speaking of publications, here are some Calls for Papers of possible interest.
- New Worlds, Terrifying Monsters, Impossible Things: Exploring the Contents and Contexts of Doctor Who
- Engendering the Disc – The Fantastic Worlds of Terry Pratchett
- Being Humans. The Human Condition in the age of techno-humanism: representations, practices, experiences

Happy early birthday to [livejournal.com profile] sarah531, [livejournal.com profile] vg_ford, [livejournal.com profile] tunes84, [livejournal.com profile] captnofmyheart, [livejournal.com profile] wildviolet4, [livejournal.com profile] savagedoc45, [livejournal.com profile] lalam, [livejournal.com profile] silveraspen, [livejournal.com profile] denorios, [livejournal.com profile] prettybirdy979, [livejournal.com profile] sakuraember, [livejournal.com profile] cherylmmorgan, [livejournal.com profile] muuranker, [livejournal.com profile] izhilzha, and [livejournal.com profile] justicemuffins. May all of you enjoy many happy returns of the day!
eldritchhobbit: (Frankenstein)
Once again for this Halloween season, National Theatre Live is offering encore performances of the brilliant Frankenstein (play by Nick Dear, directed by Danny Boyle, with Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller alternating the roles of the Creature and Frankenstein) in cinemas. To see if there's a venue near you worldwide, check the official website. I can't recommend this play highly enough.

Here is the original trailer for the play.



I have seen the performances several times. My reviews are below.

* These are my initial impressions of the Cumberbatch-as-Creature cast, including comparisons between Nick Dear's play as written and as performed.

* Here are my thoughts on the differences between the Cumberbatch-as-Creature and Miller-as-Creature casts.

Frankenstein6


Check out Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blog for all things related to all versions of Frankenstein!


"Paradise Lost excited different and far deeper emotions. I read it, as I had read the other volumes which had fallen into my hands, as a true history. It moved every feeling of wonder and awe that the picture of an omnipotent God warring with his creatures was capable of exciting. I often referred the several situations, as their similarity struck me, to my own. Like Adam, I was apparently united by no link to any other being in existence; but his state was far different from mine in every other respect. He had come forth from the hands of God a perfect creature, happy and prosperous, guarded by the especial care of his Creator; he was allowed to converse with and acquire knowledge from beings of a superior nature, but I was wretched, helpless, and alone."
- Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus

"All I wanted was your love. I could have loved you with all my heart. My poor creator."
- The Creature to Victor Frankenstein, Nick Dear's Frankenstein

Frankenstein14
eldritchhobbit: (Frankenstein)
Happy birthday to Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (30 August, 1797 – 1 February, 1851)!

Portrait of Mary Shelley


“Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it.”
- Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818)


Happy early birthday also to [livejournal.com profile] aragornlover, [livejournal.com profile] alii_s, [livejournal.com profile] beatonna, [livejournal.com profile] agameofthree, [livejournal.com profile] nowitsdark0, [livejournal.com profile] ekeppich, [livejournal.com profile] jinxed_wood, [livejournal.com profile] princeofcairo, [livejournal.com profile] chickenfried_jo, [livejournal.com profile] llembas, [livejournal.com profile] soonerwxgirl, [livejournal.com profile] delenn1960, [livejournal.com profile] sueworld2003, [livejournal.com profile] shagungu, [livejournal.com profile] xanath, [livejournal.com profile] northwestmagpie, [livejournal.com profile] curtana, [livejournal.com profile] sneakybea, [livejournal.com profile] litlover12, and [livejournal.com profile] mrua7. May you enjoy many happy returns of the day!
eldritchhobbit: (Sherlock/NRK parody murder by death)
Good news! "Sherlock Returns for One-Off Special AND Series 4."

And here are a couple of other nifty things that may be of interest. (Thanks to Michael!)

- Living with Frankenstein, a web series: "Frankenstein’s Monster (aka Frank) is alive and living in Los Angeles with Mary Shelley, P.B. Shelley, and Lord Byron. In this dark comedy the Monster is not a fictional character. P.B. Shelley created Frank, and Mary Shelley wrote the novel Frankenstein to chronicle actual events." Check it out here and here.

- Finding Hogwarts: This is a documentary film about seven Harry Potter fans and their journey to find Hogwarts, as well as the stories and shared experiences they had as they followed Harry until the very end. More details are here.



Last but not least, happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] lynn_maudlin, and happy early birthday wishes to [livejournal.com profile] morningapproach, [livejournal.com profile] gods_lil_rocker, [livejournal.com profile] splix, [livejournal.com profile] divadiane1, [livejournal.com profile] markbourne, [livejournal.com profile] sunshinedew, [livejournal.com profile] ithildyn, [livejournal.com profile] melissagay, [livejournal.com profile] faramirgirl, [livejournal.com profile] agentxpndble, [livejournal.com profile] arymetore, [livejournal.com profile] caster121, [livejournal.com profile] syrcleoftrees, [livejournal.com profile] ghislainem70, and [livejournal.com profile] johnjosephadams. May you all enjoy many happy returns of the day!
eldritchhobbit: (Frankenstein)
For the Halloween season, National Theatre Live is offering encore performances of the brilliant Frankenstein (play by Nick Dear, directed by Danny Boyle, with Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller alternating the roles of the Creature and Frankenstein). To see if there's a venue near you worldwide, check the official website. I can't recommend this play highly enough.

Here is the original trailer for the play.



I have seen the performances several times. My reviews are below.

* These are my initial impressions of the Cumberbatch-as-Creature cast, including comparisons between Nick Dear's play as written and as performed.

* Here are my thoughts on the differences between the Cumberbatch-as-Creature and Miller-as-Creature casts.

Frankenstein6


Check out Frankensteinia: The Frankenstein Blog for all things related to all versions of Frankenstein!


"Paradise Lost excited different and far deeper emotions. I read it, as I had read the other volumes which had fallen into my hands, as a true history. It moved every feeling of wonder and awe that the picture of an omnipotent God warring with his creatures was capable of exciting. I often referred the several situations, as their similarity struck me, to my own. Like Adam, I was apparently united by no link to any other being in existence; but his state was far different from mine in every other respect. He had come forth from the hands of God a perfect creature, happy and prosperous, guarded by the especial care of his Creator; he was allowed to converse with and acquire knowledge from beings of a superior nature, but I was wretched, helpless, and alone."
- Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus

"All I wanted was your love. I could have loved you with all my heart. My poor creator."
- The Creature to Victor Frankenstein, Nick Dear's Frankenstein

Frankenstein14
eldritchhobbit: (Re-Animator/Weird)
Happy Friday! May you have a terrific one, and a great weekend, as well.

Happy early birthday wishes to lynn_maudlin, morningapproach, gods_lil_rocker, bouncybabylemur, splix, divadiane1, fungus_files, markbourne, sunshinedew, and knesinka_e. May all of you enjoy many happy returns of the day!

Before I forget to mention them, here are three books I'm very excited about that either just came out or will be coming out within the next week:
nonfiction:
1. Broadview Press's third edition of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (lovely appendices!)
2. Annette Kolodny's In Search of First Contact: The Vikings of Vinland, the Peoples of the Dawnland, and the Anglo-American Anxiety of Discovery (Native America, First Contact, and the Icelandic Sagas!)
fiction:
3. D.B. Jackson's Thieftaker (great author, speculative fiction, and a historical setting in pre-Revolutionary America!)


In other news...

I'm getting my ducks in a row for Fall 2012 classes. Here's what I have lined up to teach...

1. I am thrilled to say that I will be offering internationally, online, for graduate students and auditors, Science Fiction, Part 1: From Its Modern Beginnings Through The Golden Age (1818-1966) for the Mythgard Institute. This is my favorite course to teach (followed by the second half), and I'm really excited about moving it onto a broader stage. I'll be posting more information on this as it's available. For now, here is the reading list.


Read more... )


2. I'll also be teaching my 100 Years of Single-Gender Worlds seminar as both an undergraduate and graduate course at Lenoir-Rhyne University.

Here are the assigned readings:


Read more... )



"We live on a minute island of known things. Our undiminished wonder at the mystery which surrounds us is what makes us human. In science fiction we can approach that mystery, not in small, everyday symbols, but in bigger ones of space and time." - Damon Knight
eldritchhobbit: (Frankenstein)
I just took advantage of the glorious opportunity to see the encore screenings of the National Theatre's Frankenstein (play by Nick Dear, directed by Danny Boyle, with Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller alternating the roles of the Creature and Frankenstein). I first saw it last year.

Frankenstein6


These are my initial impressions of the Cumberbatch-as-Creature cast, including comparisons between Nick Dear's play as written and as performed.

Here are my thoughts on the differences between the Cumberbatch-as-Creature and Miller-as-Creature casts. )

"All I wanted was your love. I could have loved you with all my heart. My poor creator."
- The Creature to Victor Frankenstein, Nick Dear's Frankenstein
eldritchhobbit: (Frankenstein)
Happy Friday the 13th!

Beginning in June, National Theatre Live is showing encore screenings of 2011's amazing production of Nick Dear's Frankenstein with both starring performances: Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller as, alternately, the Creature and Victor Frankenstein. (You can read my review from last year here). I've got tickets for both versions, and I can't wait! To see if there's a venue near you (in the USA, UK, Canada, South Africa, Australia, or New Zealand), check this list.

And here's the trailer:



In other news, the publishers have released more detailed information about J.K. Rowling's new novel.


"Paradise Lost excited different and far deeper emotions. I read it, as I had read the other volumes which had fallen into my hands, as a true history. It moved every feeling of wonder and awe that the picture of an omnipotent God warring with his creatures was capable of exciting. I often referred the several situations, as their similarity struck me, to my own. Like Adam, I was apparently united by no link to any other being in existence; but his state was far different from mine in every other respect. He had come forth from the hands of God a perfect creature, happy and prosperous, guarded by the especial care of his Creator; he was allowed to converse with and acquire knowledge from beings of a superior nature, but I was wretched, helpless, and alone."
- Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus
eldritchhobbit: (Frankenstein)
Today's stunning picture is by the fabulous [livejournal.com profile] lizziebelle.

unhappy


How fascinating is this? According to the new November 2011 issue of Sky & Telescope, Dr. Don Olson, an astrophysicist at Texas State University-San Marcos, claims to have used textual clues to pinpoint the precise moment, down to date and hour, when Mary Shelley conceived of Frankenstein. Read more here.

Text of the Day: This gives me an excuse to highlight another work by Mary Shelley (one of my favorite authors!), the chilling 1831 story "Transformation."

Excerpt:
I have heard it said, that, when any strange, supernatural, and necromantic adventure has occurred to a human being, that being, however desirous he may be to conceal the same, feels at certain periods torn up as it were by an intellectual earthquake, and is forced to bare the inner depths of his spirit to another. I am a witness of the truth of this. I have dearly sworn to myself never to reveal to human ears the horrors to which I once, in excess of fiendly pride, delivered myself over. The holy man who heard my confession, and reconciled me to the church, is dead. None knows that once —

Why should it not be thus? Why tell a tale of impious tempting of Providence, and soul-subduing humiliation? Why? answer me, ye who are wise in the secrets of human nature! I only know that so it is; and in spite of strong resolve — of a pride that too much masters me—of shame, and even of fear, so to render myself odious to my species — I must speak.


Read the complete story here.

Download an unabridged narration from Librivox.org.
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Walter/Strawberry death)
The PotterWatch 2011 scholarly conference was fantastic! Cheers to everyone involved. It was especially great to see [livejournal.com profile] gods_lil_rocker again and meet [livejournal.com profile] amedia in person at last.


Don't miss book blogger Book Chick City's annual All Hallow's Eve event, which runs for the entire month of October and celebrates all things that go bump in the night! Check it out here (or on Livejournal, [livejournal.com profile] bookchickcity).




What's the most Halloween-friendly television show currently on the air? For my money, it's Fringe.

Here's the trailer for the new fourth season of Fringe:



View the famous/infamous "Friday Night Re-animation" trailer for Fringe.

Text of the Day: For a limited time (that is, until Thursday, 6 October), my essay "In Search of Fringe's Literary Ancestors" (from Fringe Science: Parallel Universes, White Tulips, and Mad Scientists, 2011) is available online in its entirety from Smart Pop Books. Whether or not you like/know Fringe, I invite you to check it out, as it covers Shelley, Poe, Lovecraft, and other Halloween-friendly topics. If you read it, I hope you enjoy it.

So, if you'll kindly excuse my self-indulgence, let's delve into the spooky ancestors of a spooky series...

Excerpt:
In this segment, Abrams explains that the original vision for the series entailed revisiting “the Frankenstein idea, but told as legitimately as possible.” Telling the story “legitimately” included updating a central character by turning the aristocratic Genevan medical student Victor Frankenstein into the eccentric U.S. scientist Dr. Walter Bishop. Like Victor, Walter shuns the scientific consensus of the day, following his own genius into unorthodox, even illegal experimentation.

It’s easy to see parallels between the two characters.... To reach their desired goals, both use unethical methods. Victor plunders fresh graves to find human body parts for his laboratory and refuses to provide even the most basic of necessities to the life he creates. Walter escalates experiments with nootropic drugs on innocent children, leaving them with after-effects that continue into adulthood, and wholly ignores warnings that acting on his untested theories could, as his assistant Carla Warren tells him, “rupture the fundamental constants of nature” (“Peter,” 2-16). Furthermore, each genius single-handedly makes decisions that determine the fate of many. Victor’s neglected creation slays his friends and family members. Walter’s recklessness costs the life of his assistant, drives his wife to suicide, and plunges an alternate world into chaos.

Perhaps most importantly, both Victor and Walter are haunted by their past scientific endeavors, pursued by the evidence of their own mistakes. Everywhere Victor looks, he finds the creature. Everywhere Walter looks, he finds evidence of an upcoming violent collision between our Universe and the other one Over There, a cataclysm that he set in motion when he opened the door between worlds and took the alternate Peter as his own son. Neither Victor nor Walter can escape the consequences of science pursued with intellectual arrogance, personal selfishness, and moral unaccountability. It’s all too appropriate that Peter asks Olivia in that first episode: “You’re telling me what? My father was Dr. Frankenstein?”


Read the complete essay.


Tomorrow, back to classic texts!

Bonus quote:
Dr. Walter Bishop: When the Victoria, the last surviving ship, returned to its harbor of departure after the first circumnavigation of the earth, only 18 of the original 237 men were on board.
Small Child: What happened to them?
Dr. Walter Bishop: They all died, young lady. Horrible and most likely painful deaths. You see, when you open new doors, there is a price to pay. Now imagine... tonight, you look under your bed, and, lo and behold, you find a monster! And you're immediately eaten. Now, if you hadn't looked for the monster, you wouldn't have found it and you'd still be happy in your bed, instead of being slowly digested in the stomach sack of the creature. But, with any luck, your sister or your brothers might have heard your screams, and your endeavor will serve as a valuable lesson to them.
- from "What Lies Below," Fringe
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Walter/Self-Medicated)
Thanks to all on the US East Coast who checked in yesterday on my post about the earthquake. I'm so glad everyone's all right. From io9: "How Could an Earthquake Happen in Virginia?"


My most recent StarShipSofa "Looking Back on Genre History" segment, which discusses the literary history that informs the TV series Fringe and previews Fringe Science: Parallel Universes, White Tulips and Mad Scientists, is now available. You can download it or listen to it here. If you listen, I hope you enjoy. (A full list of my past podcast segments, with links, is available here.)

And speaking of Fringe Science: Parallel Universes, White Tulips and Mad Scientists, that book will be on bookshelves next week. My essay "In Search of Fringe's Literary Ancestors" includes sections on Fringe as the New Frankenstein; Edgar Allan Poe, Ratiocination, and Genre; Literary Science Fiction Investigators; Televised Science Fiction Investigators; and H.P. Lovecraft's Influence on Fringe.




I'll leave you with this parting thought:

funny pictures history - He Was Stuck In The Past Due To A Transporter Accident
see more Historic LOL



"Keep Calm and Expecto Patronum."
- seen on t-shirt
eldritchhobbit: (HP/Snape/Tori)
Thanks to everyone who's participated in my new Doctor Who poll. It's still open, if anyone else would like to take part!

I'm being interviewed this afternoon by WUTC 88.1 FM, Chattanooga's NPR station, for a news story regarding the Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows film. Good heavens, it's hard to believe this is the last in the series... My tissues are packed and ready.

Harry potter and the deathly hallows part 2


And now, for news...

* My most recent "Looking Back on Genre History" segment, which discusses H.P. Lovecraft's non-fiction essays "Supernatural Horror in Literature," "Some Notes on Interplanetary Fiction," and "Notes on Writing Weird Fiction," is up today at StarShipSofa. This new show also includes the second of my three-part reading of Rachel Swirsky's Nebula Award-winning and Hugo Award-nominated novella The Lady Who Plucked Red Flowers Beneath The Queen’s Window. All of this is available here, on the latest episode of the podcast.

* Today's TeeFury shirt is from Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog!

* I'm intrigued by the Con of Wrath documentary project.

* Librivox.org has some new unabridged audiobooks available for free download. Several are of interest to genre readers:
The Italian by Ann Radcliffe
The Witch of Salem by John R. Musick
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelley


"Tell me one thing," said Harry. "Is this real? Or has this been happening inside my head?"

Dumbledore beamed at him, and his voice sounded loud and strong in Harry's ears even though the bright mist was descending again, obscuring his figure.

"Of course it is happening inside your head, Harry, but why on earth should that mean that it is not real?"

- J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
eldritchhobbit: (Frankenstein)
Even after revisiting the novel and reading Nick Dear's play, I was unprepared for the impact of seeing National Theatre Live's Frankenstein.

Some thoughts on yesterday's performance with Benedict Cumberbatch as the Creature and Jonny Lee Miller as Victor Frankenstein. )

Photobucket


Parting miscellany:
* There's a terrific gallery of more than 90 pictures of the play here.
* I bought the soundtrack.
* I'm taking the fact that the National Theatre is filming a "making of" documentary about the play as a good sign that a DVD of the dual performances (with both leads in both roles) may be forthcoming. I badly want to watch several crucial scenes from both performances back to back.


Victor: But this is remarkable! You are educated! And you have memory!
The Creature: Yes, I use it to remember being hunted like a rat, running from human places, finding refuge in the woods. I use it to remember being beaten and whipped. And I was good, I wanted to be good!

- Nick Dear's Frankenstein, based on a novel by Mary Shelley
eldritchhobbit: (Wuthering Heights)
Hi everyone! I'm back from a fantastic time at StellarCon. Alas, I managed to pick up the "con crud" while I was enjoying the great programming, so now I'm a bit under the weather. I hope to catch up with everyone soon.

* My most recent StarShipSofa "Looking Back on Genre History" segment, which discusses the long tradition of Frankenstein adaptations on stage (in honor of the new play currently at the National Theatre), is now available in the latest episode of the podcast. You can download it or listen to it here. If you listen, I hope you enjoy. (A full list of my past podcast segments, with links, is available here.)

* Happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] lovefromgirl and [livejournal.com profile] emerdavid, and happy early birthday to [livejournal.com profile] artwhisperer. May each of you enjoy a great day and a wonderful year to come!

funny pictures history - CHRISTMAS GHOST STORY WEKEEND: THEY ALWAYS START LIKE THIS...
see more Historic LOL


March is the month of expectation,
The things we do not know,
The Persons of Prognostication
Are coming now.
We try to sham becoming firmness,
But pompous joy
Betrays us, as his first betrothal
Betrays a boy.
- Emily Dickinson, XLVIII
eldritchhobbit: (SF/Exploring space)
A Study in Scarlet (Beeton's Christmas Annual) by Toronto Public Library Special Collections
I'll be off tomorrow for StellarCon! I look forward to seeing some of you there. In the meantime, I have many links to share:

* StarShipSofa's episode with the nominees for this year's British Science Fiction Association Award for "Best Short Story" is now available, and it includes my narration of Aliette de Bodard's "The Shipmaker."

* The second of my two interviews with KosmosOnline Podcast, this one on the themes of liberty in Joss Whedon's Firefly and Serenity, is now available here.

* Underworld will be releasing a soundtrack album for Nick Dear's new Frankenstein play.

* March 4, 2011 marks the 130th anniversary of Sherlock Holmes's investigation of the "Lauriston Gardens Mystery," aka A Study in Scarlet. [livejournal.com profile] study130 is a new community celebrating A Study in Scarlet (and its modern incarnations, including Neil Gaiman's "A Study in Emerald" and the BBC's Sherlock episode "A Study in Pink").

* I thought this was a most interesting exchange regarding Helen Mirren's role in the latest version of The Tempest:
-- "On Prospero's Island" by Ursula K. Le Guin
-- in response, "As Weak as Women's Magic" by Athena Andreadis

* From Cthulhu Chick: "Wordcount for Lovecraft’s Favorite Words." "Hideous" FTW! (Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] wellinghall.)

* When oh when is the second series of Garrow's Law going to be available on US DVD? We inhaled the first series, and now we need more.

* Happy early birthday wishes to [livejournal.com profile] mizz_history! May you enjoy your day and a wonderful year to come.


"I consider that a man's brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things, so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it."
- Sherlock Holmes, A Study in Scarlet, Arthur Conan Doyle

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