eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Walter/Strawberry death)
Just a quick note to say that my essay "In Search of Fringe's Literary Ancestors" from the book Fringe Science is the spotlight essay today at the Smart Pop Books website. You can read it for free here!
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Walter/Strawberry death)
I'm currently hard at work on a Secret Project of (Temporary) Secretness, but I wanted to resurface for a quick note...

First, in honor of Fringe's return for the fall television season, Fringe Science: Parallel Universes, White Tulips, and Mad Scientists (2011), which includes my essay "In Search of Fringe's Literary Ancestors," is on sale for 99 cents in Kindle format through September 23. Here it is!

Cover for Fringe Science


Speaking of the fall season, which new programs do you intend to "audition"? We plan to give Revolution, Last Resort, and 666 Park Avenue a try. Each looks promising: here's hoping one or more delivers! (I've already seen the Elementary pilot, and I definitely will not be going back for seconds.)

What about you?


Walter: Hello, I'm Dr. Walter Bishop. This is test subject number six.
Peter: What happened to subjects one through five?
Walter: I believe the university settled with them out of court. They probably never had to work again. Not that they could.
- "Unearthed," Fringe
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Astrid)
Hello and happy Sunday, my friends!

Good news all around...

1. Earlier I failed to post about my latest "Looking Back on Genre History" segment for StarShipSofa, which is a tribute to the great author John Christopher, who died in February 2012. You can listen or download it here. An updated list of all of my podcast appearances (with links) is available here.

2. This mashup of Sherlock and The Man from U.N.C.L.E. put a big grin on my face.

3. So many upcoming birthdays! Happy early birthday wishes to [livejournal.com profile] angelinehawkes, [livejournal.com profile] idwoman, [livejournal.com profile] pseudoanorexic, [livejournal.com profile] vyrdolak, [livejournal.com profile] lyria_theringer, and [livejournal.com profile] bistokidsfan77. May you all enjoy a wonderful day and a fantastic year to come.

4. I've accepted invitations to speak this fall at The McConnell Center at the University of Louisville and next spring at StellarCon 37. My updated speaking schedule is here.

5. Fringe has been renewed for a fifth and final season.

And there's already a trailer... Feel the chills?



Fringe is a remarkably creative series that has set the bar as one of television’s most imaginative dramas... Bringing it back for a final 13 allows us to provide the climactic conclusion that its passionate and loyal fans deserve. The amazing work the producers, writers and the incredibly talented cast and crew have delivered the last four seasons has literally been out of this world. Although the end is bittersweet, it’s going to be a very exciting final chapter.”
- Fox President Kevin Reilly
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Hand)
* The always-eldritch Dwight MacPherson is offering the first chapter of his forthcoming Howard Lovecraft and the Undersea Kingdom for free download. It's Lovecraft! It's MacPherson! It's free! What's not to love? Check out the preview here.

* My paper on the literary ancestors of the TV series Fringe (including Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, H.P. Lovecraft, and the tradition of "SF investigator" literature) has been accepted for presentation in March at SONAR: The Symposium On Nerdy Academic Research (I love that name!), which should be loads of fun.


As you may recall, last May I went to DC to film some videos for The Institute for Humane Studies. Well, the first has gone live into the YouTube 'verse. More are forthcoming.

(For those of you who know me in real life, no, I don't know why I look like I haven't slept in six months. For those of you who don't know me in real life, meet the lisp that fought my childhood speech therapists and won!)

As usual, I'm far better via the written word than in person; FYI, this mini-talk is based on my article "Not the Same Old Hickory: The Contested Legacy of Andrew Jackson" in Reason.




"To read a poem in January is as lovely as to go for a walk in June."
- Jean-Paul Sartre
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Walter/Strawberry death)
The PotterWatch 2011 scholarly conference was fantastic! Cheers to everyone involved. It was especially great to see [livejournal.com profile] gods_lil_rocker again and meet [livejournal.com profile] amedia in person at last.


Don't miss book blogger Book Chick City's annual All Hallow's Eve event, which runs for the entire month of October and celebrates all things that go bump in the night! Check it out here (or on Livejournal, [livejournal.com profile] bookchickcity).




What's the most Halloween-friendly television show currently on the air? For my money, it's Fringe.

Here's the trailer for the new fourth season of Fringe:



View the famous/infamous "Friday Night Re-animation" trailer for Fringe.

Text of the Day: For a limited time (that is, until Thursday, 6 October), my essay "In Search of Fringe's Literary Ancestors" (from Fringe Science: Parallel Universes, White Tulips, and Mad Scientists, 2011) is available online in its entirety from Smart Pop Books. Whether or not you like/know Fringe, I invite you to check it out, as it covers Shelley, Poe, Lovecraft, and other Halloween-friendly topics. If you read it, I hope you enjoy it.

So, if you'll kindly excuse my self-indulgence, let's delve into the spooky ancestors of a spooky series...

Excerpt:
In this segment, Abrams explains that the original vision for the series entailed revisiting “the Frankenstein idea, but told as legitimately as possible.” Telling the story “legitimately” included updating a central character by turning the aristocratic Genevan medical student Victor Frankenstein into the eccentric U.S. scientist Dr. Walter Bishop. Like Victor, Walter shuns the scientific consensus of the day, following his own genius into unorthodox, even illegal experimentation.

It’s easy to see parallels between the two characters.... To reach their desired goals, both use unethical methods. Victor plunders fresh graves to find human body parts for his laboratory and refuses to provide even the most basic of necessities to the life he creates. Walter escalates experiments with nootropic drugs on innocent children, leaving them with after-effects that continue into adulthood, and wholly ignores warnings that acting on his untested theories could, as his assistant Carla Warren tells him, “rupture the fundamental constants of nature” (“Peter,” 2-16). Furthermore, each genius single-handedly makes decisions that determine the fate of many. Victor’s neglected creation slays his friends and family members. Walter’s recklessness costs the life of his assistant, drives his wife to suicide, and plunges an alternate world into chaos.

Perhaps most importantly, both Victor and Walter are haunted by their past scientific endeavors, pursued by the evidence of their own mistakes. Everywhere Victor looks, he finds the creature. Everywhere Walter looks, he finds evidence of an upcoming violent collision between our Universe and the other one Over There, a cataclysm that he set in motion when he opened the door between worlds and took the alternate Peter as his own son. Neither Victor nor Walter can escape the consequences of science pursued with intellectual arrogance, personal selfishness, and moral unaccountability. It’s all too appropriate that Peter asks Olivia in that first episode: “You’re telling me what? My father was Dr. Frankenstein?”


Read the complete essay.


Tomorrow, back to classic texts!

Bonus quote:
Dr. Walter Bishop: When the Victoria, the last surviving ship, returned to its harbor of departure after the first circumnavigation of the earth, only 18 of the original 237 men were on board.
Small Child: What happened to them?
Dr. Walter Bishop: They all died, young lady. Horrible and most likely painful deaths. You see, when you open new doors, there is a price to pay. Now imagine... tonight, you look under your bed, and, lo and behold, you find a monster! And you're immediately eaten. Now, if you hadn't looked for the monster, you wouldn't have found it and you'd still be happy in your bed, instead of being slowly digested in the stomach sack of the creature. But, with any luck, your sister or your brothers might have heard your screams, and your endeavor will serve as a valuable lesson to them.
- from "What Lies Below," Fringe
eldritchhobbit: (Sherlock/ and Holmes)
* I'd like to give a grateful shout-out to the brave men and women of the fire crews from Macomb, Wanette, Bethel, Tecumseh, McLoud, Shawnee, and Pink, Oklahoma, as well as the Cleveland County Task Force, with fire crews from Norman, Slaughterville, Cedar Country, Moore, and Little Axe, the Pottawatomie County sheriff’s office and tribal police, and the Black Hawk helicopter crews from the Oklahoma National Guard, all of whom worked together along with local landowners yesterday to end a sudden 300-acre wildfire that raged up to the very border of my parents' property. Fortunately, no one was harmed, ranch animals were safely evacuated, and the fire has been contained (although there's an alert for another one now less than ten miles away). Here's hoping for cooler weather and rain for the area this weekend. You can see footage of yesterday's fire from Oklahoma City's KOCO here.

* In general news, I was delighted to see Anthony Letizia of Alterna-tv.com just posted a lovely review of Fringe Science: Parallel Universes, White Tulips, and Mad Scientists.

* Happy early birthday wishes to [livejournal.com profile] marthawells, [livejournal.com profile] aragornlover, [livejournal.com profile] snard, and [livejournal.com profile] alii_s! May each of you enjoy a wonderful day and a fantastic year to come.


Now, about those Sherlock Holmes pastiches...

Some months ago, I asked for recommendations of Sherlock Holmes pastiches and received some great replies. (Thank you!) I waited until I'd finished going through all of Arthur Conan Doyle's canonical Holmesian writings in order, but now I've embarked on my pastiche reading. I'm still only "baby steps" into the project, but I thought I'd list the novels I've read thus far, ranked in order from my most favorite to my least favorite. My reviews are general, and though they may contain a few spoilers about the premise of a given work, they don't give away any twist endings or key surprises.

Novels

Most Favorite Novel Thus Far:
Dust and Shadow: An Account of the Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson by Lyndsay Faye (2009)
Read my review.

The Mycroft Memoranda by Ray Walsh (1985)
Read my review.

The Last Sherlock Holmes Story by Michael Dibdin (1978)
Read my review.

The Whitechapel Horrors by Edward B. Hanna (1992)
Read my review.

The West End Horror: A Posthumous Memoir of John H. Watson, M.D. by Nicholas Meyer (1976)
Read my review.

The Seven-Percent Solution: Being a Reprint from the Reminiscences of John H. Watson, M.D. by Nicholas Meyer (1974)
Read my review.

The Canary Trainer: From the Memoirs of John H. Watson by Nicholas Meyer (1993)
Read my review.

Lestrade and the Ripper by M.J. Trow (1999)
Read my review.

Sherlock Holmes: The Rediscovered Railway Mysteries and Other Stories by John Taylor (2010)
Read my review.


I had difficulty ranking The West End Horror and The Seven-Percent Solution, as they were rather neck-and-neck for me. I'd recommend all of these except Trow's and Taylor's to fans of Holmes in general, but I'd still recommend Taylor's to those specifically who are fans of Benedict Cumberbatch.


Collections

The Improbable Adventures of Sherlock Holmes edited by John Joseph Adams (2009)
Read my review.


Other

In the novella/novelette category, I've read and thoroughly enjoyed "The Adventure of the Elusive Emeralds" (a poignant mystery with terrific Watson characterization, in particular, in Sherlock Holmes Mystery Magazine #4) and "The Adventure of the Haunted Bagpipes" (a truly chilling mystery with a very real and disturbing threat to Holmes and Watson in Sherlock Holmes Mystery Magazine #5), both by Carla Coupe (aka [livejournal.com profile] beledibabe). I highly recommend them.


Next up in my pastiche reading: the novel Sherlock Holmes and the Apocalypse Murders by Barry Day (2001) and the collection Sherlock Holmes in Orbit edited by Mike Resnick and Martin H. Greenberg (1995).


"My patronus is yo mama."
- seen on t-shirt
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Walter/Self-Medicated)
Thanks to all on the US East Coast who checked in yesterday on my post about the earthquake. I'm so glad everyone's all right. From io9: "How Could an Earthquake Happen in Virginia?"


My most recent StarShipSofa "Looking Back on Genre History" segment, which discusses the literary history that informs the TV series Fringe and previews Fringe Science: Parallel Universes, White Tulips and Mad Scientists, is now available. You can download it or listen to it here. If you listen, I hope you enjoy. (A full list of my past podcast segments, with links, is available here.)

And speaking of Fringe Science: Parallel Universes, White Tulips and Mad Scientists, that book will be on bookshelves next week. My essay "In Search of Fringe's Literary Ancestors" includes sections on Fringe as the New Frankenstein; Edgar Allan Poe, Ratiocination, and Genre; Literary Science Fiction Investigators; Televised Science Fiction Investigators; and H.P. Lovecraft's Influence on Fringe.




I'll leave you with this parting thought:

funny pictures history - He Was Stuck In The Past Due To A Transporter Accident
see more Historic LOL



"Keep Calm and Expecto Patronum."
- seen on t-shirt
eldritchhobbit: (LOTR/Bilbo/Party)
Just a few quick notes today...

* My most recent StarShipSofa "Looking Back on Genre History" segment, which discusses the nearly-forgotten speculative fiction writings of author Ella Scrymsour (including short stories with the first great fictional female "paranormal detective," Shiela Crerar, Psychic Investigator), is now available in the latest episode of the podcast. You can download it or listen to it here. If you listen, I hope you enjoy. (A full list of my past podcast segments, with links, is available here.)

* Today's TeeFury shirt design is from Fringe!

* The Mythopoeic Society has announced the finalists for the 2011 Mythopoeic Awards. A number of terrific titles made the final ballot. I'm pleased to see that Middle-earth Minstrel: Essays on Music in Tolkien is a nominee for "Mythopoeic Scholarship Award in Inklings Studies." (This collection includes my essay "'Tolkien is the Wind and the Way': The Educational Value of Tolkien-Inspired World Music.") Congratulations to editor Bradford Lee Eden, and to all of the nominees!

Middle-Earth Minstrel: Essays on Music in Tolkien



I've got no use for dragons,
I've got no use for swords.
I'll never make a wordy toast
To a table full of lords.

Of pearls and opals give me none,
Of rubies red as fire;
The beer at The Prancing Pony
Is all that I desire.
- "The King's Beer," Glass Hammer
eldritchhobbit: (Default)
* Happy Star Wars Day! May the Fourth be with you!

* Happy early birthday wishes to [personal profile] vyrdolak, [profile] pseudoanorexic, and [profile] lyria_theringer. May all of you enjoy many happy returns of the day!

* I'm getting ready to head up to Washington, D.C. I'll be back by the weekend. If all goes well, I'll be filming five lectures that will go online in the near future. *fingers crossed*

* Article recommendation: Peter Monaghan's review of Steve F. Anderson's new Technologies of History: Visual Media and the Eccentricity of the Past: "What Do Rocky and Bullwinkle Have to Do With History?"

* I'll leave you with the trailer for "The Day We Died," the season finale of Fringe. (Yes, that's Brad Dourif. Awesome, no? His character's name is Moreau. Very H.G. Wells, don't you think?)





"The past is routinely being remixed, reimagined, rescripted, and reappropriated in powerful and eccentric ways, often by individuals—fans, geeks, hackers, teens, and artists—who do not necessarily see themselves as engaged in the discourse of history at all."

Anderson elaborates in an interview: "It is very likely not the book by the Harvard historian that 300 people in the world read that gives us a historical sensibility and becomes part of how we behave in the world," he says. "It's The X-Files."

- Peter Monaghan, "What Do Rocky and Bullwinkle Have to Do With History?"
eldritchhobbit: (Star Wars/Pre-Raphaelite)
* Happy Star Wars Day! May the Fourth be with you!

* Happy early birthday wishes to [livejournal.com profile] vyrdolak, [livejournal.com profile] pseudoanorexic, and [livejournal.com profile] lyria_theringer. May all of you enjoy many happy returns of the day!

* I'm getting ready to head up to Washington, D.C. If all goes well, I'll be filming five lectures that will go online in the near future. *fingers crossed*

* Article recommendation: Peter Monaghan's review of Steve F. Anderson's new Technologies of History: Visual Media and the Eccentricity of the Past: "What Do Rocky and Bullwinkle Have to Do With History?"

* I'll leave you with the trailer for "The Day We Died," the season finale of Fringe. (Yes, that's Brad Dourif. Awesome, no? His character's name is Moreau. Very H.G. Wells, don't you think?)





"The past is routinely being remixed, reimagined, rescripted, and reappropriated in powerful and eccentric ways, often by individuals—fans, geeks, hackers, teens, and artists—who do not necessarily see themselves as engaged in the discourse of history at all."

Anderson elaborates in an interview: "It is very likely not the book by the Harvard historian that 300 people in the world read that gives us a historical sensibility and becomes part of how we behave in the world," he says. "It's The X-Files."

- Peter Monaghan, "What Do Rocky and Bullwinkle Have to Do With History?"
eldritchhobbit: (Default)
Lots of happiness today...

* My essay "In Search Of Fringe's Literary Ancestors" is completed and accepted for the forthcoming book Fringe Science: Parallel Universes, White Tulips, and Mad Scientists. I'm quite looking forward to reading the other essays in the collection when it's published.

* StarShipSofa, for the second year in a row, has been nominated for a Hugo Award! Yay Team! Tremendous thanks to all who listen to and support us. There are many other reasons I'm excited about this year's Hugo nominees, too, including Lois McMaster Bujold, Doctor Who, and Saladin Ahmed, among others.

* Sherlock has been nominated for Best Drama Series, Best Actor (Benedict Cumberbatch), and Best Supporting Actor (Martin Freeman) for the BAFTA TV Awards.

* It's grey and rainy, my favorite kind of day.

I hope you have a wonderful one!


Walter: Why not bring a little life to the dead I say!
- "Brown Betty," Fringe
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Walter/Self-Medicated)
Lots of happiness today...

* My essay "In Search Of Fringe's Literary Ancestors" is completed and accepted for the forthcoming book Fringe Science: Parallel Universes, White Tulips, and Mad Scientists. I'm quite looking forward to reading the other essays in the collection when it's published.

* StarShipSofa, for the second year in a row, has been nominated for a Hugo Award! Congratulations to Tony C. Smith! Yay Team! Tremendous thanks to all who listen to and support us. There are many other reasons I'm excited about this year's Hugo nominees, too, including Lois McMaster Bujold, Doctor Who, and Saladin Ahmed, among others.

* Sherlock has been nominated for Best Drama Series, Best Actor (Benedict Cumberbatch), and Best Supporting Actor (Martin Freeman) for the BAFTA TV Awards.

* It's grey and rainy, my favorite kind of day.

I hope you have a wonderful one!


Walter: Why not bring a little life to the dead I say!
- "Brown Betty," Fringe
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe)
Happy early birthday wishes to [livejournal.com profile] lalam, [livejournal.com profile] silveraspen, and [livejournal.com profile] prettybirdy979. May all three of you enjoy many happy returns of the day!

* I just finished the full draft of my essay for the Fringe Science collection (which has been the reason I've been so quiet recently). Next up on my "to do" list is completing my essay "From Amerind to Dorvan: The Future History of Native America in Star Trek" for the Star Trek and History collection. I also need to complete my annotations for and introduction to The Demon of Brockenheim. Those are my main non-fiction writing goals for the spring.

* In my undergraduate/graduate course on the dystopian tradition, my students are currently discussing Ever Since the World Ended, which we watched on Monday. I'm still surprised that this film doesn't come up more often in talks about science fiction and post-apocalyptic fiction. It's quite interesting in several ways. I recommend it, if you haven't seen it.

* The "Harry Potter and Crossover Audiences: The 2011 Potter Watch Conference" event, originally scheduled for Saturday, is being rescheduled for Fall 2011. I look forward to participating in it then.

* In other news, Librivox.org has a couple of new unabridged recordings that may be of interest:
-- The Mad Planet by Murray Leinster
-- Project Gutenberg Goth Collection of Spooky Stories


I spent a bit more time with Frankenstein yet again while preparing my Fringe essay, so this seemed appropriate to post:

funny pictures history - MARY SHELLEY'S SCHOOLBUS
see more Historic LOL



Walter: I've spent my life making things that bring joy and happiness to make the world a better place. Bubble gum, that was one of my first. Flannel pajamas. Ah, rainbows! And my latest project -- singing corpses!
- "Brown Betty," Fringe
eldritchhobbit: (Dr. Who - Smith)
I'm hard at work to meet my writing deadlines, but I wanted to drop by and say hello.

Happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] sarah531 and [livejournal.com profile] vg_ford, and happy early birthday to [livejournal.com profile] lothithil, [livejournal.com profile] captnofmyheart, and [livejournal.com profile] wildviolet4. May all of you enjoy many happy returns of the day!

And with apologies for my tardiness...
R.I.P., Diana Wynne Jones.
R.I.P., April Derleth.

And in other news...
* Fringe has been renewed. Yay!

* The trailer for the new season of Doctor Who has been released. Yay!




To everyone, happy April 1st!

Just a warning that on April Fool's Day my natural distrust of others will be ratcheted up to a level bordering on psychosis



April
Comes like an idiot, babbling and strewing flowers.
- Edna St. Vincent Millay
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Walter/Strawberry death)
Hello everyone! Yes, I'm still alive, or so they tell me. I've been really sick, and then my better half became really sick, and yet work hasn't slowed down much for either of us. I've been Epic Fail personified in terms of keeping up with everyone, but I hope to catch up soon. Please excuse me.

Happy birthday wishes to [livejournal.com profile] jasonbsizemore, [livejournal.com profile] dannyboy8406, and [livejournal.com profile] _snitchbitch. Happy early birthday wishes to [livejournal.com profile] killerweasel, [livejournal.com profile] ashesngolddust, and [livejournal.com profile] wellinghall. May all of you have wonderful days, my friends, and a fantastic year to come!

Fringe by sudarshannus



Despite the ick and the drugs for the ick, I've been working on my piece regarding the 19th-century and very early 20th-century literary antecedents to the "speculative fiction investigators/detectives" of Fringe. Since my learned and wise friends know all – at least, all that's worth knowing – I thought I'd put out a call and ask your help: What have I missed?

Investigators of 19th/early 20th-Century Literary SF: Precursors to Fringe

Here's my list of characters for discussion: What do you think? )


Am I missing anything important? I welcome any/all suggestions, especially for the 19th/early 20th-century literature section, which is the heart of the piece. Thanks so much!

Walternate: Nature doesn't recognize good and evil, Philip. Nature only recognizes balance and imbalance. I intend to restore balance to our world. Whatever it takes.
- from "Amber 31422," Fringe
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Astrid)
I have lots of links to share today:

* The nominees for the Saturn Awards have been announced by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror. I'm very pleased to see Fringe, Sherlock, Lost, Breaking Bad, and Doctor Who represented so well, and the impressive Monsters appearing in the Best International Film category.

* A bookseller in Cornwall has found five of the lost stories of Daphne du Maurier, and they're going to be published as a new collection. I am there.

* From io9: "What Would It Take For Grownups to Love Dystopian Fiction as Much as Teenagers?"

* From SFSignal: "'The Way Is Open If We Want to Take It': The Dystopian Spirit in 21st-Century SF."

* Steve Niles and Jeffrey Combs are collaborating on a Nevermore comic based on the one-man play about Edgar Allan Poe.

* Lance Henriksen's autobiography, Not Bad for a Human, will soon be released.

Early happy birthday wishes to [livejournal.com profile] rosamundeb and [livejournal.com profile] kalquessa! May you both enjoy a wonderful day and a great year to come.


funny pictures history - EARTH  That's it right there.
see more Historic LOL


Peter Bishop: That was Olivia. Agent Jessup told her Hughes may have killed his wife and child 17 years ago.
Dr. Walter Bishop: Oh, finally some good news. I assume we can dig them up? I haven't had any bodies to examine.
- Fringe, "Night of Desirable Objects"
eldritchhobbit: (Neil Gaiman)
Yes folks, it's that time again: I've updated my working list of young adult dystopian novels. There have been a number of new releases and forthcoming titles announced lately. If you have any recommendations or suggestions for me, I'd be most grateful! Thanks so much. (Note: If you follow/bookmark this link, you'll always be directed to the most recent iteration of this list.)

--Fifty Years of English-Language Young Adult Dystopian Fiction, With Links )

--Secondary Sources Relating to Young Adult Dystopias, A Select Bibliography )

And, for your amusement...

funny celebrity pictures - Sherlock channeling Jack Donaghy
see more Lol Celebs


My quotes for the day come from this past week's terrific episode of Fringe:
___
Peter Bishop: You know, a thank you wouldn't kill you.
Dr. Walter Bishop: Oh, I'm sorry if at this moment when the universe is collapsing I forgot the magic word.
___
Astrid Farnsworth: How come?
Dr. Walter Bishop: Dear God, is it 'Second-Guess Everything I Do Day'? Because I haven't been informed.

- Fringe, "6B"
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Walter/Strawberry death)

The forthcoming Smart Pop book Fringe Science: Parallel Universes, White Tulips, and Mad Scientists, dedicated to the series Fringe, now has cover art! (I'm writing an essay for this collection now.) I'm very happy to see that TV Guide is reporting that Fringe has a good chance of renewal for next season.


I have a few links to share:

* Two great websites and fannish resources, The John Castle Gallery and CI5 Addict, are now accepting donations (via a donation button at the bottom of each site) to help cover their hosting fees. The buttons will disappear once the fees have been met. If you enjoy these sites, please consider helping out!

* From SFSignal: "The All-Encompassing Machinery: Dystopia in the 21st Century."

* From Morgan Dempsey at Inkpunks: "Why I Like YA SFF."

* Happy early birthday wishes to [livejournal.com profile] firiath and [livejournal.com profile] alicia_stardust. May you both enjoy many happy returns of the day!


The historian in me gets quite a laugh from this (and, for that matter, you can never have too much Martin Freeman)...





"My dear, I'm not certain that you're not simply a figment of my imagination."
- Dr. Walter Bishop, "Momentum Deferred," Fringe
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe)
The cover art has been released for the Smart Pop Books anthology Nyx in the House of Night: Mythology, Folklore and Religion in the P.C. and Kristin Cast Vampyre Series. The book is scheduled for June 2011 release and includes my essay “Reimagining ‘Magic City’: How the Casts Mythologize Tulsa.”

Cover for Nyx in the House of Night: Mythology, Folklore and Religion in the PC and Kristin Cast Vampyre Series (2011)


And speaking of Smart Pop Books, I've just agreed to write an essay for their forthcoming collection on Fringe about the debt the series owes to the fictional investigators in early science fiction literature and the works of H.P. Lovecraft, in particular. It should be great fun!


In other news...




This seems like an appropriate quote for the day:

Dr. Walter Bishop: When the Victoria, the last surviving ship, return to its harbor of departure after the first circumnavigation of the earth, only 18 of the original 237 men were on board.

Small Child: What happened to them?

Dr. Walter Bishop: They all died, young lady. Horrible and most likely painful deaths. You see, when you open new doors, there is a price to pay. Now imagine... tonight, you look under your bed, and, lo and behold, you find a monster! And you're immediately eaten. Now, if you hadn't looked for the monster, you wouldn't have found it and you'd still be happy in your bed, instead of being slowly digested in the stomach sack of the creature. But, with any luck, your sister or your brothers might have heard your screams, and your endeavor will serve as a valuable lesson to them.

- from "What Lies Below," Fringe
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe)

As a devotee of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, the Gothic tradition, and most especially early science fiction, I'm extremely excited about Nick Dear's new stage adaptation of Frankenstein, which will run next year at the National Theatre. Not only is it being directed by Danny Boyle (of 28 Days Later and Slumdog Millionaire fame), but the play also stars Benedict Cumberbatch (from my favorite current series, Sherlock) and Jonny Lee Miller (from Dexter), who will alternate the roles of Victor Frankenstein and the Creature. Fortunately, as part of the National Theatre Live series, a live performance of Frankenstein will be shown in select movie theaters in the United States. More details are here. I'm looking forward to it!

Speaking of science fiction (and, for that matter, reanimated bodies), the terrific Fringe will be in a new time slot when it returns to the Fox Network next month. It's the dreaded Friday night slot of death, I'm sad to say. Fox has responded to fan outrage, though, with an "In Your Face, Fox-Hater!" promo that's certainly worth a watch:




Last but not least, Turner Classic Movies creates an annual video in memory of those in the film industry who died during the year. (Last year's is here.) This is "TCM Remembers 2010":



"Fine. If you end up breaking the universe, this time it's on your head."
- Walter Bishop, Fringe, "6955 kHz"

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Tags

Page generated Aug. 23rd, 2017 01:42 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios