eldritchhobbit: (Halloween/vintage)
Vintage Skull with Coloured Tissue Liner


All best wishes and good thoughts go out to those of you affected by the storm. We have wind advisories here today and some potential for snow, but nothing serious.

Looking for Halloween reading/listening/viewing recommendations? Here are some from Neil Gaiman.

In addition, Project Gutenberg has added Jack London's classic post-apocalyptic novel The Scarlet Plague (1912), which is set in the year 2073, six decades after a worldwide pandemic has decimated the planet (I love those "last man on earth" stories!), and this is the perfect time of year to read it.


Text of the Day: Today's verse is the eerie "All Soul's Eve" (1920) by Darl Macleod Boyle.

The evening is dark, and the sky is misty, and the wind blows low:
O wind, cease swaying the bare, bare branches, bending them to and fro,
They look too like ghosts in the pale moonlight,
Ah, too like ghosts in the dusky night,
When ghosts glide to and fro!

O ghosts not laid, and ghosts forgotten, and the ghosts of the evil dead,
Why will ye come to sear my heart, when I thought ye had gone and fled,
Why do ye come on this night of the year,
Does it ease your pain to behold my fear,
Since all is done and said?


Vintage Halloween Jack-O-Lantern (German)
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween)
Huge thanks to everyone at The McConnell Center and the University of Louisville community for the very warm welcome! I had a fantastic time as a speaker and guest on the campus.

From io9: "The 55 Scariest Moments from Science Fiction and Fantasy Movies." (Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] wellinghall.)


And now, perfect for the Halloween season, here's a great video set to Neil Gaiman's brilliant poem "The Day the Saucers Came."



The Text of the Day is Neil Gaiman's Lovecraftian "I, Cthulhu; or What's A Tentacle-Faced Thing Like Me Doing In A Sunken City Like This (Latitude 47° 9' S, Longitude 126° 43' W)."

Excerpt: Cthulhu, they call me. Great Cthulhu.

Nobody can pronounce it right.

Are you writing this down? Every word? Good. Where shall I start -- mm?

Very well, then. The beginning. Write this down, Whateley.

I was spawned uncounted aeons ago, in the dark mists of Khhaa'yngnaiih (no, of course I don't know how to spell it. Write it as it sounds), of nameless nightmare parents, under a gibbous moon. It wasn't the moon of this planet, of course, it was a real moon. On some nights it filled over half the sky and as it rose you could watch the crimson blood drip and trickle down its bloated face, staining it red, until at its height it bathed the swamps and towers in a gory dead red light.

Those were the days.

Read the Complete Story: Here.


As a parting image, here's Cthulhu the jack-o'-lantern.

Cthulhu Lantern 1
eldritchhobbit: (Neil Gaiman)
Last call for holiday cards! If you'd like to receive one from me, please reply here. Thanks so much!

Don't forget Neil Gaiman will be on The Simpsons on Sunday. There's a teeny tiny clip at the beginning of this interview he did with Craig Ferguson:



You can see a longer clip here.


"Things need not have happened to be true. Tales and dreams are the shadow-truths that will endure when mere facts are dust and ashes, and forgot."
― Neil Gaiman, The Sandman, Vol. 3: Dream Country
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween)

I'm feeling rather Lovecraftian today.

One of my favorite groups to listen to during the Halloween season is Nox Arcana. Whether you want music inspired by the Grimm Brothers, Edgar Allan Poe, and H.P. Lovecraft, or music inspired by pirates, vampires, and haunted houses, their albums are a perfect backdrop to October. You can listen to many of their songs at their website.



Let's take in a music video for the song "Hidden Horrors" from the album Blackthorn Asylum by Nox Arcana. Can you spot all of the references to H.P. Lovecraft?



Text of the Day: In keeping with today's theme, here's the Lovecraft-inspired short story "I Cthulhu or What's A Tentacle-Faced Thing Like Me Doing In A Sunken City Like This (Latitude 47° 9' S, Longitude 126° 43' W)?" by Neil Gaiman (1960-present).

Teaser:
Cthulhu, they call me. Great Cthulhu.

Nobody can pronounce it right.

Are you writing this down? Every word? Good. Where shall I start -- mm?

Very well, then. The beginning. Write this down, Whateley.

I was spawned uncounted aeons ago, in the dark mists of Khhaa'yngnaiih (no, of course I don't know how to spell it. Write it as it sounds), of nameless nightmare parents, under a gibbous moon. It wasn't the moon of this planet, of course, it was a real moon. On some nights it filled over half the sky and as it rose you could watch the crimson blood drip and trickle down its bloated face, staining it red, until at its height it bathed the swamps and towers in a gory dead red light.

Those were the days.

Read the complete short story here.
eldritchhobbit: (MST3K/Plot device)
Happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] cherylmmorgan, and happy early birthday to [livejournal.com profile] muuranker. May you both enjoy many happy returns of the day!


* My most recent StarShipSofa "History of the Genre" segment, which this month is about the young adult science fiction author David Severn, a.k.a. David Storr Unwin (1918-2010), is now available in the latest episode of the podcast. You can download it or listen to it here. If you listen, I hope you enjoy. (A full list of my past podcast segments, with links, is available here.)

* Here's an important article from Cory Doctorow in The Guardian. To quote Doctorow, "Baking surveillance, control and censorship into the very fabric of our networks, devices and laws is the absolute road to dictatorial hell."

* You may recall that I previously posted about Sherry Kelly's fascinating biography of Michael Dunn (the Academy Award-nominated actor of lasting Wild Wild West, Star Trek, and Get Smart fame). My friend Tim O'Shea of Talking with Tim has just posted a new interview with Kelly about her book.

* From Genevieve Valentine at Fantasy Magazine: "What YA Fantasy Means for Movies."

* From Brainz: "The 10 Greatest Apocalyptic Novels Of All Time." While there are some great novels on the list, other key titles are missing, perhaps most notably the haunting Level 7 by Mordecai Roshwald.

* Speaking of post-apocalyptic fiction, I just finished This World That We Live In, the third book in Susan Beth Pfeffer's "Last Survivors" trilogy. If you liked Life As We Knew It and The Dead and The Gone, you'll want to read this, as it brings together the characters from the other two books. This latest installment seems to have missed some important opportunities, but it's still very compelling reading. Kudos to Pfeffer for refusing to take the easy way out with her ending (which I won't spoil for you here).


I'll leave you with Neil Gaiman reading from his children's book Instructions over images of Charles Vess's wonderful art.




After a while you get used to being cold, and hungry, and living in the dark.

But you can’t get used to losing people. Or if you can, I don’t want to. So many people in the past year, people I’ve loved, have vanished from my life. Some have died; others have moved on. It almost doesn’t matter. Gone is gone.


- Susan Beth Pfeffer, This World We Live In
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween)

Happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] grisemalkin, and best wishes for many happy returns of the day!


I have a few Halloween-related news items to share:

* From ThisKevin: "5 Music Videos about Werewolves."

* Travis Prinzi, author of Harry Potter and Imagination: The Way Between Two Worlds and editor of Hog's Head Conversations: Essays on Harry Potter and all-around great guy, recently gave a lecture in New York entitled "Harry Potter, Dracula, & Frankenstein: Fear and Gothic Elements in J.K. Rowling’s Best Selling Novels.” The recording of this lecture is now available online. Read more about it here.

* My latest segment is up at StarShipSofa: The Audio Science Fiction Magazine, and it is my talk on "Young Adult Dystopian Fiction" -- a longer version than the one I gave at WorldCon, and a shorter version than the one I gave at the McConnell Center at the University of Louisville. It is available for download or streaming here. (Hey, there's a Halloween connection: dystopias are scary!)

* I think it's brilliant that fans of Neil Gaiman's wonderful novel The Graveyard Book (which my students are reading this week for class, as a matter of fact) have filmed themselves dancing the Macabray. Read more here. And here they are:





Spooky Text of the Day: Today's text is the poem "Lenora (Lenore)" (1790) by Göttfried August Bürger and translated by Dante Gabriel Rossetti.

Excerpt:
But see! but see! in an eyelid's beat,
Towhoo! a ghastly wonder!
The horseman's jerkin, piece by piece,
Dropped off like brittle tinder!
Fleshless and hairless, a naked skull,
The sight of his weird head was horrible;
The lifelike mask was there no more,
And a scythe and a sandglass the skeleton bore.

Loud snorted the horse as he plunged and reared,
And the sparks were scattered round: --
What man shall say if he vanished away,
Or sank in the gaping ground?
Groans from the earth and shrieks in the air!
Howling and wailing everywhere!
Half dead, half living, the soul of Lenora
Fought as it never had fought before.


Read the complete poem here.
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween)

* Many thanks to [livejournal.com profile] lizziebelle for allowing me to feature her wonderfully eerie pictures in my posts these past several days (including this one today). Be sure to check out all of her remarkable cemetery photos here.

* One of my favorite groups to listen to during the Halloween season is Nox Arcana. Whether you want music inspired by the Grimm Brothers, Edgar Allan Poe, and H.P. Lovecraft, or music inspired by pirates, vampires, and haunted houses, their albums are a perfect backdrop to October. They've released a new album for the season called Blackthorn Manor, based on the theme of a "forsaken sanitarium that is haunted by the souls of the dead and plagued by the dark essence of evil."

You can listen to many of their songs streaming at their website.




Spooky Text of the Day: One of the many reasons I love Halloween is the sense of awe and wonder it produces, if we allow ourselves to be receptive to it. Neil Gaiman's poem captures this very well, and I like to revisit it each October. It seems particularly ideal for a Monday, and thus today's text is "The Day The Saucers Came" by Neil Gaiman (1960-present).

That day, the saucers landed. Hundreds of them, golden,
Silent, coming down from the sky like great snowflakes,
And the people of Earth stood and stared as they descended,
Waiting, dry-mouthed to find what waited inside for us
And none of us knowing if we would be here tomorrow
But you didn't notice it because

That day, the day the saucers came, by some coincidence,
Was the day that the graves gave up their dead
And the zombies pushed up through soft earth
or erupted, shambling and dull-eyed, unstoppable,
Came towards us, the living, and we screamed and ran,
But you did not notice this because

On the saucer day, which was the zombie day, it was
Ragnarok also, and the television screens showed us
A ship built of dead-man's nails, a serpent, a wolf,
All bigger than the mind could hold, and the cameraman could
Not get far enough away, and then the Gods came out
But you did not see them coming because

On the saucer-zombie-battling gods day the floodgates broke )

You can watch Neil Gaiman read this poem here:


eldritchhobbit: (Firefly/Losing Side)
Hello, everyone! I'm back from Montreal and slowly recuperating from WorldCon. I'm currently catching up with emails and posts, and I hope to be in touch with everyone to whom I owe responses very soon.


* I came home to some shiny news: the abstract for my essay "Crowded in My Sky": Liberty and the Frontier in Firefly and Serenity" has been accepted for the forthcoming anthology The Philosophy of Joss Whedon, edited by Dean A. Kowalski and S. Evan Kreider. My article grew out of the lecture I gave at UCLA a couple of years ago, following Firefly's Tim Minear, about frontier literature and positive and negative concepts of liberty.

* In other news, I am very excited about the forthcoming two-book set from Library of America, American Fantastic Tales.

* The website is now up for ReConStruction: The 10th Occasional North American Science Fiction Convention to be held in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA from August 5-8, 2010.

* Now for one more memory from WorldCon: here's the video of Neil Gaiman reading Cory Doctorow's "The Right Book."






“We should grant power over affairs only to those who are reluctant to hold it and then only under conditions that increase the reluctance.”
– Frank Herbert, Chapterhouse: Dune
eldritchhobbit: (SF/Exploring space)
Hello once more from Montreal!

Here's my report for most of the third day of the 67th WorldCon. )

"Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away." – Philip K. Dick
eldritchhobbit: (Space/Jupiter)
Hello again from beautiful Montreal!

I have another update to share.Here's my report from the second day of the 67th WorldCon. )


"At no time had Hobbits of any kind been warlike, and they had never fought among themselves.... Nonetheless, ease and peace had left this people still curiously tough. They were, if it came to it, difficult to daunt or to kill; and they were, perhaps, so unwearyingly fond of good things not least because they could, when put to it, do without them, and could survive rough handling by grief, foe, or weather in a way that astonished those who did not know them well and looked no further than their bellies and their well-fed faces."
- J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings
eldritchhobbit: (Day the Earth Stood Still)
Hello from beautiful Montreal!

Here's my report from the first day of the 67th WorldCon. )

"We have learned now that we cannot regard this planet as being fenced in and a secure abiding place for Man; we can never anticipate the unseen good or evil that may come upon us suddenly out of space."
- H.G. Wells, The War of the Worlds
eldritchhobbit: (Neil Gaiman)
Happy belated birthdays to [livejournal.com profile] rosamundeb and [livejournal.com profile] kalquessa! May you enjoy many happy returns of the day.

Apologies for being quiet of late. I'm quite busy with work at the moment. I plan to catch up with everyone and post more very soon.

Until then, here's a video of Neil Gaiman's Blueberry Girl. I first heard him read this at MythCon, where he explained that he wrote it as a gift when Tori Amos had her baby daughter. Since I discovered Gaiman's work through Tori Amos's music, I have a special place in my heart for this:



"Deck the halls,
I'm young again, I'm you again,
Racing turtles -
The grapefruit is winning.
Seems I keep getting this story twisted,
So where's Neil when you need him?"
"Space Dog," Tori Amos
eldritchhobbit: (LOTR/Eomer)
Happy birthday to the one, the only, the fabulous [livejournal.com profile] dodger_winslow, a true artist in every sense of the word. Have an excellent one, my friend, and many more to come!

Also, congratulations to my friend Rebecca Kirkland, who has been honored with a commendation from the county of Los Angeles in recognition of her dedicated service to its citizens, and in particular for her work in providing opportunities for disadvantaged children to attend live performances in the arts. Well done, Rebecca!


In other news...

* Those of you who know of my professional interest in and personal love for Tolkien-inspired music appreciate the fact that I greedily consume everything from Argentinian folk music to German metal in the name of Middle-earth. I was pleased to find this article recently on Strange Horizons: "Elven Lays and Power Chords: Chaos, Revelry, and Community in Tolkien-Themed Heavy Metal."


* The Audio Publishers Association has announced the nominees for the 2009 Audie Awards for excellence in audiobooks. Here are some of the nominations in particular that made me happy:

"Audio Drama"
Tales from the Perilous Realm by J.R.R. Tolkien, Narrated by Michael Hornden and a full cast, BBC Audiobooks America

"Children's Titles for Ages 8-12" and "Thriller/Suspense"
The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman, Narrated by Neil Gaiman, HarperAudio

"History"
The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family by Annette Gordon-Reed, Narrated by Karen White, Tantor Media

"Inspirational/Faith-Based Non-Fiction" and "Multi-Voice Performance"
A Word of Promise: Next Generation-New Testament, Narrated by Sean Astin and a full cast, Thomas Nelson, Inc.

"Solo Narration - Male"
Timothy Dalton, Narrator of The Silver Swan by Benjamin Black, Macmillan Audio

"Teens"
The Compound by S.A. Bodeen, Narrated by Christopher Lane, Brilliance Audio


The doom of the Noldor drew near.
The words of a banished king:
"I swear revenge!"
- from "Nightfall," Blind Guardian
eldritchhobbit: (Star Wars/Merlin/Gandalf)

Halloween_1977_12
Originally uploaded by Photo Knight
Happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] arisbe, and best wishes for many happy returns of the day!


In other news...

* I couldn't be happier that Neil Gaiman won the Newberry Medal for The Graveyard Book! It's a fantastic book, and I highly recommend it to one and all.

* The Slice of SciFi podcast included in show #197 a loving tribute to the late Patrick McGoohan and Ricardo Montalban via a mash-up entitled "The Wrath of the Prisoner of Fantasy Island." You can catch it approximately 25 minutes into the show.

* Free Speculative Fiction Online has added a number of classic works to its archive, including truly excellent novels such as John Wyndham's The Day of the Triffids and Harry Harrison's Make Room! Make Room!, among others. Read more here.

* The "Growing Up Star Wars 1977-1985 Flickr Group" originally started by Todd Franklin, Glen Mullaly, and Mike Middleton has hit the big time! From Time Magazine's "Tech and Geek Blog" (penned by The Simpsons writer Matt Selman), to Flickr's official blog, to feeder and aggregator destinations such as MetalFilter, Digg and others, the visibility for the group has grown tremendously. Long-time group member and Star Trek veteran Wil Wheaton even posted an entry on his blog about this group dedicated to looking back at the first wave of Star Wars fans and their many different ways of enjoying and expressing their love for "That Space Movie." You can visit the "Growing Up Star Wars 1977-1985 Flickr Group" here.

* On a related note, I've agreed to allow the Italian pop culture magazine Bang Art to print a picture of my six-year-old Princess Leia self in its forthcoming issue dedicated to Star Wars and its legacy. What can I say? Hand me a plastic lightsaber, and I'll be six years old again, in less time than it takes the Millennium Falcon to make the jump to lightspeed.


"Things need not have happened to be true. Tales and dreams are the shadow-truths that will endure when mere facts are dust and ashes, and forgot."
- Neil Gaiman, The Sandman: A Midsummer Night's Dream
eldritchhobbit: (Skeleton)
Happy October to everyone! I am looking forward to enjoying this month with you. Every day I will have some spooky literature to share, and I also have links, videos, and other goodies planned. Coming up on Friday I have an extra special surprise in the spirit of Halloween that I'm looking forward to posting, and I hope you will find it fun.

I can't think of a better way to get into the Halloween spirit than listening (for free!) to Neil Gaiman read the first chapter of his brand new novel, The Graveyard Book. I'm currently about halfway through reading this novel, and it's fantastic. Press the play button on the widget below to listen:





LINK OF THE DAY: Today's Halloween link is the October 1, 2008 "Aural Delights No. 44" show from StarShipSofa: The Audio Science Fiction Magazine, which includes, among other things, a dramatic reading of David Kopsaka Merkel's "Flesh Eating Alien Vampire Sex On The Moon," and a commentary segment by yours truly about "Five 'Must Read' Stories for Halloween." (To avoid repetition, none of the stories I mention in my segment will be featured this month here on my blog.) Download the show here or listen to it live streaming here. I hope you enjoy it!

Also, be sure to visit [livejournal.com profile] fungus_files and [livejournal.com profile] magicwondershow, both of whom are hosting their own daily October celebrations this year. Their posts are not to be missed!


LITERATURE OF THE DAY: Today's story is a short but thoroughly spooky tale by William Fryer Harvey (1885-1937) entitled "August Heat." Don't let the title fool you; it's perfect for October!

Excerpt from "August Heat" by William Fryer Harvey:
He pointed to the end of the gravestone on which he was at work, and I sat down.

"That's a beautiful piece of stone you've got hold of," I said.

He shook his head. "In a way it is," he answered; "the surface here is as fine as anything you could wish, but there's a big flaw at the back, though I don't expect you'd ever notice it. I could never make really a good job of a bit of marble like that. It would be all right in the summer like this; it wouldn't mind the blasted heat. But wait till the winter comes. There's nothing quite like frost to find out the weak points in stone."


Read the complete story.
eldritchhobbit: (Neil Gaiman)
Happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] alii_s. May you have a wonderful day today and many more to come!

A few notes...

* For a limited time, HarperCollins is making Neil Gaiman's fantastic novel Neverwhere available online for free. I can't recommend this book highly enough. If you haven't read it, here's a perfect opportunity!

* Thanks to everyone who participated in my poll about October. My annual month-long, Halloween-inspired "spooky" blogfest will indeed be back this year, and I'm busy making plans, so I hope it will be lots of fun for everyone. I know I'm looking forward to it!

* Today we went to Charlotte and saw the "A Day in Pompeii" exhibit at Discovery Place. It was quite remarkable, especially the room-size frescoes, the funerary sculptures, and the plaster casts of the victims. Charlotte is the final U.S. destination for this exhibit, so if you're in the area and interested, be sure to see it.


"The breezes taste
Of apple peel.
The air is full
Of smells to feel-
Ripe fruit, old footballs,
Burning brush,
New books, erasers,
Chalk, and such.
The bee, his hive,
Well-honeyed hum,
And Mother cuts
Chrysanthemums.
Like plates washed clean
With suds, the days
Are polished with
A morning haze."
- John Updike
eldritchhobbit: (Re-Animator/Weird)
Today is the birthday of H.P. Lovecraft!

I've posted several things about Lovecraft in the past. Here are a couple of posts that may still be of interest:
* Pictures of My Tour of Lovecraftian Providence
* Neil Gaiman's Writings Inspired by Lovecraft's work

Some of my favorite Lovecraft sites include the following:
* The H.P. Lovecraft Archive
* Index of The Works of Howard Phillips Lovecraft
* H.P. Lovecraft’s Library
* The H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society
* "H.P. Lovecraft" by S.T. Joshi


And in other news...

* Congratulations to this year's worthy winners of The Mythopoeic Awards!

* Last Sunday the Hickory Daily Record ran "Welcome to LRU," an article about the transition of Lenoir-Rhyne College to Lenoir-Rhyne University. This is the school where my husband is Provost; the change, which will be official this Saturday, is the biggest in the institution's 117-year history.

* Also this Saturday is "Are We Alone?," a talk and reception at the Catawba Science Center and Planetarium featuring Dr. Seth Shostak, senior astronomer with the SETI Institute in California and Chair of the International Academy of Astronautics SETI Permanent Group. It should be a fascinating evening! I'm looking forward to attending. If anyone is in the area and interested, I hope you'll check out the event.


"In a rear vestry room beside the apse Blake found a rotting desk and ceiling-high shelves of mildewed, disintegrating books. Here for the first time he received a positive shock of objective horror, for the titles of those books told him much. They were the black, forbidden things which most sane people have never even heard of, or have heard of only in furtive, timorous whispers; the banned and dreaded repositories of equivocal secret and immemorial formulae which have trickled down the stream of time from the days of man's youth, and the dim, fabulous days before man was. He had himself read many of them - a Latin version of the abhorred Necronomicon, the sinister Liber Ivonis, the infamous Cultes des Goules of Comte d'Erlette, the Unaussprechlichen Kulten of von Junzt, and old Ludvig Prinn's hellish De Vermis Mysteriis. But there were others he had known merely by reputation or not at all - the Pnakotic Manuscripts, the Book of Dzyan, and a crumbling volume of wholly unidentifiable characters yet with certain symbols and diagrams shuddering recognizable to the occult student. Clearly, the lingering local rumours had not lied. This place had once been the seat of an evil older than mankind and wider than the known universe."
- from The Haunter of the Dark by H.P. Lovecraft
eldritchhobbit: (Neil Gaiman)
Happy birthday to two terrific people, [livejournal.com profile] goodnightlady and [livejournal.com profile] clara_swift! May both of you enjoy a wonderful day today and many more to come!

A couple of notes...

* Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book is due out in the United States on September 30, 2008. Can I wait that long? It will be difficult. Dave McKean has already said it's much stronger than Coraline, and I adore that book. Gaiman answers the question of the book's target audience here.

* Fyodor Bondarchuk is currently shooting a Russian science fiction epic entitled Inhabited Island. Rumor has it that it boasts one of the biggest budgets of any Russian film to date at $30 million. Release is scheduled for October 2008. The movie is based upon the 1971 novel Prisoners of Power, a political satire of the Soviet regime written by science fiction legends Arkady and Boris Strugatsky. I don't know how good the film will be, but if it leads new readers to discover the Strugatsky brothers, I'll consider it a positive thing.
View the trailer.
Visit the official film website.


And a quote for the day:

Rule 3: Independent, stubborn thinking is the stock trait of a true evil scientist
A scientist who solicits the opinions of others, listens carefully to their suggestions, and acts on the recommendations wouldn’t seem very evil. Always ignore the advice of even your closest comrades, particularly when they offer sound suggestions like killing a nemesis quickly and verifying his or her death.
- from Ten Simple Rules for Graduate Students in the Evil Sciences
eldritchhobbit: (Default)
Happy birthday to the wonderful [livejournal.com profile] maidoforange! May you have a terrific day today and many more to come, my friend!


A few notes...

* This past week, The Telegraph ran an interesting article on one of my favorite authors, Daphne du Maurier. Read "The Real Ghost of Manderley" here. An excerpt from the new novel about her, Daphne by Justine Picardie, is here.

* In celebration of his blog's anniversary, Neil Gaiman is offering his fantastic novel American Gods free for one month online. Read it here.

* I was very sorry to read in numerous blogs of the death of author Janet Kagan (1946-2008). I first discovered her through her Star Trek novel Uhura's Song, which remains one of my favorites. She is perhaps best remembered for her novelette "The Nutcracker Coup," which won a Hugo Award in 1993, and her novel Hellspark (1988).


"No fancy in the world is all untrue."
Kim Stanley Robinson, Red Mars
eldritchhobbit: (Neil Gaiman)
I am trying to be certain I have found all of Neil Gaiman's works directly related to H.P. Lovecraft.

My list at present includes the following:

1. "I Cthulhu: or What’s A Tentacle-Faced Thing Like Me Doing In A Sunken City Like This (Latitude 47 ° 9’ S, Longitude 126 ° 43’ W)?"
* originally published in 1986, now online

2. "Only The End of the World Again"
* originally published in 1994 in Shadows Over Innsmouth

3. "Shoggoth's Old Peculiar"
* originally published in 1998 in The Mammoth Book of Comic Fantasy

[Both "Only The End of the World Again" and "Shoggoth's Old Peculiar" are also available in Smoke and Mirrors: Short Fictions and Illusions]

4. "A Study in Emerald"
* originally published in 2003 in Shadows over Baker Street, now online
* 2004 Hugo Award Winner

Also, there's Neil Gaiman's interview in the 2004 documentary The Eldritch Influence: The Life, Vision and Phenomenon of H.P. Lovecraft


If you know of anything I've missed, please let me know! Thanks so much.


Quotes for the day:

"He simply gave you a vision of an impossibly inhospitable universe in which we are screwed."

"The interesting thing is in Lovecraft, people don't do the wrong thing in the way that you normally do in horror fiction. In horror fiction, you do the wrong thing: you go into the shop and you buy that cat-headed object you probably shouldn't, or whatever, and everything goes bad. In Lovecraft, you simply get a room in a wrong place, move to the wrong town, read the wrong story. You're just screwed."

-Neil Gaiman on H.P. Lovecraft from The Eldritch Influence: The Life, Vision and Phenomenon of H.P. Lovecraft

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