eldritchhobbit: (books/coffee)
I am delighted to share that The Imaginary Voyages of Edgar Allan Poe #1 from Hocus Pocus Comics is now available here through Comixology.

“Edgar Allan Poe has lost everyone he ever loved and now he is losing his mind. Haunted by his dead wife and his literary failures, the poet tumbles into a fantastic world created by his genius…and his madness.”

Here is the trailer.

eldritchhobbit: (Headstone)
I am delighted to share the book trailer for Elevator #1 from Hocus Pocus Comics!

eldritchhobbit: (Wuthering Heights)
Happy birthday to Charles Brockden Brown (17 January, 1771 – 22 February, 1810) and Anne Brontë (17 January, 1820 – 28 May, 1849)!

"Yet I will persist to the end. My narrative may be invaded by inaccuracy and confusion; but if I live no longer, I will, at least, live to complete it. What but ambiguities, abruptnesses, and dark transitions, can be expected from the historian who is, at the same time, the sufferer of these disasters?"
- Charles Brockden Brown, Wieland: or, The Transformation: An American Tale (1789)

Ormond, or The Secret Witness The Tenant of Wildfell Hall


“Are you hero enough to unite yourself to one whom you know to be suspected and despised by all around you, and identify your interests and your honor with hers?”
- Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (1848)
eldritchhobbit: (Read/Vintage)
Happy birthday, Wilkie Collins (8 January, 1824 – 23 September, 1889)!

done (finally)


“They seem to be in a conspiracy to persecute you,” she said. “What does it mean?”
“Only the protest of the world, Miss Verinder — on a very small scale — against anything that is new.”

― Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone (1868)
eldritchhobbit: (Edgar Allan Poe/Raven)
How about starting December with some good news?!?

I am absolutely delighted to be a part of this.

Hocus Pocus Comics Launches With Edgar Allan Poe and Houdini Comics: The Imaginary Voyages of Edgar Allan Poe marks debut for innovative digital media publishing company

Lakeland, FL: Start-Up Comic Publishers Hocus Pocus Comics will release their dynamic debut comic, The Imaginary Voyages of Edgar Allan Poe, and their website, hpcomics.net, on January 1st, 2017. This begins their first wave of properties to be sold on ComiXology, with the publishers releasing four additional titles throughout 2017.



The Imaginary Voyages of Edgar Allan Poe is a rebranding of the Harvey and Eagle Award-nominated Surreal Adventures of Edgar Allan Poo created by Hocus Pocus Comics’ founder, Dwight L. MacPherson. The Imaginary Voyages of Edgar Allan Poe offers a twisted glimpse into the dream-life of America's greatest fantasist, Edgar Allan Poe, in the darkest time of his life. Book 1 will be reprinted as Book 1, Issues 1-4 (with an exclusive cover by David Hartman, Rob Zombie album cover artist and producer of Phantasm: Ravager). Book 2 will feature an updated script and all-new art by Luis Czerniawski (Transformers: Evolutions, Kolchak the Nightstalker: The Forgotten Lore of Edgar Allan Poe) and Book 3 is a brand-new story that will finally complete MacPherson’s magnum opus. As he says, “Many readers have asked me what happened to Book 3, as they loved the characters and story. I’ve often joked that it’s a ‘lost book.’ Well, the time is right to finally complete this epic, and I couldn’t be more excited to share this ‘lost book’ with the world!”

Hocus Pocus Comics’ second title, Houdini’s Silver Dollar Misfits, is described by MacPherson as “Harry Potter meets Gravity Falls.” The first issue will be released this spring, and it will feature a cover by David Hartman and interior art by Mathieu Benoit (Jim Reaper: Week One, Lil’ Hellions: A Day at the Zoo).

Speaking on Hocus Pocus Comics’ mission, MacPherson says, “I believe that telling incredible stories is fundamental to a successful publishing company. There are many publishers pumping out a whole lot of mediocre properties, but we would rather take our time, stay small, and produce 3-4 extremely well-written, beautifully-illustrated books per year that will stick with readers long after they finish reading. We believe that good stories are magical, and we will do everything in our power to conjure some truly unforgettable magic.” To that end, MacPherson has put together several stellar teams working on books of several different genres. Hocus Pocus Comics’ motto is Imaginatio est Magicae (Imagination is Magic). Their goal is to create the future’s myths and legends, one comic at a time.

President and Publisher: Dwight L. MacPherson
Comic creator, writer, and editor Dwight L. MacPherson has been one of the most prolific writing professionals for more than 10 years. A longtime advocate of webcomics and digital media, his steampunk webcomic, Sidewise (DC Comics), won the June 2009 Zuda competition. He has also seen his creator-owned properties published by Image Comics, IDW Publishing, and many others. For more information, visit his website.

Editor-in-Chief: Amy H. Sturgis
Amy H. Sturgis holds a Ph.D. in intellectual history from Vanderbilt University, teaches at Lenoir-Rhyne University, and specializes in Science Fiction/Fantasy and Native American Studies. The author of four books and over fifty essays, and the editor of six books, Sturgis has won awards for her scholarship (The Imperishable Flame Award for J.R.R. Tolkien Scholarship), journalism (Best Magazine Review/Criticism/Column Award from the Los Angeles Press Club), and podcasting (The Sofanaut Award from listeners of the Hugo Award-winning StarShipSofa). For more information, visit her website.

Creative Director: Bruce Brown
Bruce Brown is the creator and writer of Howard Lovecraft and the Frozen Kingdom, now a motion picture. He is also the co-writer (with Dwight L. MacPherson) of Howard Lovecraft and the Undersea Kingdom, which is now in pre-production. Several of Brown’s properties have been published by Image Comics and Arcana Comics. He has multiple properties currently in production as well as a spin-off to the wildly successful Howard Lovecraft series.

Production Manager: J.M. Bryan
J. M. Bryan is a writer and designer. He has an Associates in the Arts degree from Jackson College and a Bachelor of Theology w/minor in Language from Michigan Baptist Seminary. He spends his days with his wife and two children and his nights pouring his imagination onto paper. He is currently writing two comic series.

Vice President, Administration: Rebecca MacPherson
Rebecca MacPherson has over seven years of TV/Film and Theatre Production experience from her tenure at both Tribune Studios and Fox Studios. An NAACP Award for Best Local Producer nominee for the Los Angeles production of Stage Directions, she worked with Academy Award-winning actor Denzel Washington as Production Secretary on his directorial debut, Antwone Fisher, for Fox Searchlight Films.

For more information on Hocus Pocus Comics, please contact: info.hpcomics@gmail.com

Follow Hocus Pocus Comics on Twitter.
Visit Hocus Pocus Comics on Patreon.
eldritchhobbit: (Dracula/Gorey)
Happy birthday to Bram Stoker (8 November, 1847 – 20 April, 1912)!

dracula


“There was one great tomb more lordly than all the rest; huge it was, and nobly proportioned. On it was but one word, DRACULA.”
― Bram Stoker, Dracula (1897)
eldritchhobbit: (Headstone)
Here are two quick recommendations of works I recently finished that are perfect for the season.
* Book rec:
A Taste for Monsters by Matthew J. Kirby (2016), historical/mystery/horror/fantasy YA. What a beautiful, haunting story! My review is here.
* Netflix streaming rec:
Glitch. This is the Australian version of France's take on "the dead are back," The Returned (which I also love), but a unique enough spin to make this its own separate animal. The first season has six episodes (binge-able!) and the second season is in production now. Great writing. Intriguing and poignant.

On to the countdown...

While we were at Worldcon in August, my fantastic mother picked up for me a beautiful picture book, saying that it "looked like me" (which I take as a huge compliment). It's a gorgeous, Gothic story, both spooky and heartwarming, and I can't recommend it enough: The Lady ParaNorma by Vincent Marcone.



As it turns out, the picture book is based on an equally gorgeous short film. I present to you The Lady ParaNorma.

eldritchhobbit: (Ripper/neglect)
Congratulations to Theodric, who won the first Halloween-friendly book giveaway. Now it's time for another one!

To enter, you need to be 1) over the age of eighteen, 2) not me (or my doppleganger, Mirror Universe self, alternate universe self, evil twin, or future ghost), and 3) living somewhere on the planet Earth (because shipping costs to the International Space Station are outrageous).

The winner gets to choose one of these vintage paperbacks (both in great condition, tight binding and clean text, from a smoke-free home), and I will ship it immediately.


Option 1: Fear Itself edited by Jeff Gelb (1995)

Official Description: "America's masters of horror confess their most secret terrors in 21 blood-chilling stories. This collection concerns the fears that prey on ordinary people every day: plane crashes, intruders, spiders, snakes, etc. Fear Itself features works by Nancy A. Collins, Rex Miller, Thomas F. Monteleone, Joyce Carol Oates, Rick Hautala, Graham Masterson, Max Allan Collins, and others."


Option 2: Young Blood edited by Mike Baker (1994)

Official Description: "Youthful vision is the theme of this chilling anthology in which every story was written before the author's thirty-first birthday...

* A decaying bayou mansion hides a gruesome secret
* The dead rise from their tombs to form their own street gang
* A bookstore deals in rare and dangerous books
* You've heard of the tooth fairy - now meet the eye fairy

"Enter these darkly imaginative realms of terror. Whether the classic youthful gems of master writers, or the original tales of talented newcomers, they may just scare you into an early grave. This collection includes stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Robert E. Howard, Robert Bloch, and more."




The giveaway is open now and ends on Friday, October 21.

Here it is!

a Rafflecopter giveaway


Here's a Discussion Question for you: What's the scariest tale you've ever read? (Intentionally scary, that is: I'm not counting badly written/poorly edited stuff.) In other words, what's your most creeptastic book or story recommendation?


"It was a cold, desolate night, the kind that wouldn't just turn its back on terrible goings-on, but would stand by and watch."
- A Taste for Monsters by Matthew J. Kirby
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween/vintage)
It's time for a Halloween-friendly book giveaway!

To enter, you need to be 1) over the age of eighteen, 2) not me (or my doppleganger, Mirror Universe self, alternate universe self, evil twin, or future ghost), and 3) living somewhere on the planet Earth (because shipping costs to the International Space Station are outrageous).

The winner gets to choose one of these new paperbacks, and I will ship it immediately.


Option 1: A Lonely and Curious Country: Tales from the Lands of Lovecraft edited by Matthew Carpenter (2015)

Official Description: "Horror can lurk in the most unlikely places: from the secluded cottage to the teeming metropolis. Lovecraft knew that terror could be rooted in the geography of a place as much as in an uncaring cosmos or a man’s soul. In these 17 brand new tales of chilling Lovecraftian horrors by leading authors, discover new lands of terror. Learn the truth about the glories of Y’ha-nthlei and what really happened to Erich Zann. Discover the fate of Tillinghast’s monstrous machine and do a deal with Nyarlathotep down in the byways of Mississippi. Sometimes that lonely farmhouse, brooding silently in its isolation, can be more terrifying than forgotten monoliths on an uncharted Pacific island."

This collection features stories by Rebecca Allred, Christine Morgan, Robert M. Prize, Pete Rawlik, and many more.


Option 2: Sweeter Than Wine: A Story of Love, Sleuthing and Vampires by L. Neil Smith (2011)

Official Description: "With just one tiny exception, J Gifford is an ordinary, decent, small-town kind of guy. He pays his bills on time. He waters his lawn. He treats his neighbors and the folks with whom he does business with kindness and respect. He's good to children and small animals. The tiny exception? He's a vampire.

"Born in 1920, and "brought over" shortly after D-Day in a little French village, 90-year-old Gifford still looks and feels 24. He has friends, a place in the community, a thriving business, and a big orange tabby cat named Fiddlestring. He knows where all the good restaurants are. He's very tidy about that "tiny exception" and has never killed anybody. All he lacks in his life is the beautiful girl who made him what he is today -- and then mysteriously vanished. Now, suddenly, after sixty-five years, she's back and needs his help. But is she his long-lost love or a serial-killing fiend? Only time—and blood—will tell."



The giveaway is open now and ends on Friday, October 14.

Here it is!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Now, here's a Discussion Question for you: If you could only watch one film on all of the Halloweens to come, which film would you choose? In other words, what's your very favorite "go to" Halloween movie?


“Gorgons, and Hydras, and Chimaeras — dire stories of Celaeno and the Harpies — may reproduce themselves in the brain of superstition — but they were there before. They are transcripts, types — the archetypes are in us, and eternal. How else should the recital of that which we know in a waking sense to be false come to affect us at all? Is it that we naturally conceive terror from such objects, considered in their capacity of being able to inflict upon us bodily injury? O, least of all! These terrors are of older standing. They date beyond body — or without the body, they would have been the same. . . . That the kind of fear here treated is purely spiritual — that it is strong in proportion as it is objectless on earth, that it predominates in the period of our sinless infancy — are difficulties the solution of which might afford some probable insight into our ante-mundane condition, and a peep at least into the shadowland of pre-existence.”
— Charles Lamb: “Witches and Other Night-Fears”
eldritchhobbit: (Skeleton)
Am I the only one who is delighted with American Horror Story: Roanoke thus far? This is shaping up to be one of my favorite seasons of AHS, and that's saying something.

Now on to my post...

If you're looking for some classic reading for this season, you can't go wrong with the excellent The Cold Embrace: Weird Stories by Women, published earlier this year by Dover Horror Classics and edited by well-known scholar S.T. Joshi.

Here's the official description: This original anthology presents 19 short stories that cover nearly a century of speculative fiction by women authors. Selections range from Mary Shelley's "Transformation" (1830), a pendant to Frankenstein in its themes and motifs, to "Where Their Fire Is Not Quenched" (1922) by May Sinclair, a tale of time travel that follows its heroine to Hell and back.

Gripping narratives include Virginia Woolf's "A Haunted House," in which a ghostly couple revisit their former home; "A Wedding Chest" by Vernon Lee, a story of romance and revenge that unfolds in Renaissance Italy; and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper," recounting a woman's psychic possession by the previous occupant of her attic bedroom. Additional tales include E. Nesbit's "From the Dead," "The Eyes" by Edith Wharton, Elizabeth Gaskell's "Curious If True," and many others. Editor S.T. Joshi offers an extensive Introduction as well as notes on each of the authors.




One of the spooky stories included is "Death and the Woman" by Gertrude Atherton (1893).

You can listen to two different (and free!) Librivox recordings of the story here and here, and you can find an online version of the story here.

Here is a chilling little excerpt from "Death and the Woman":

"She knew that it was Death who was coming to her through the silent deserted house; knew that it was the sensitive ear of her intelligence that heard him, not the dull, coarse-grained ear of the body.

"He toiled up the stair painfully, as if he were old and tired with much. work. But how could he afford to loiter, with all the work he had to do? Every minute, every second, he must be in demand to hook his cold, hard finger about a soul struggling to escape from its putrefying tenement. But probably he had his emissaries, his minions: for only those worthy of the honor did he come in person.

"He reached the first landing and crept like a cat down the hall to the next stair, then crawled slowly up as before. Light as the footfalls were, they were squarely planted, unfaltering; slow, they never halted."
eldritchhobbit: (Books and coffee)
I'm delighted to announce that I've accepted an invitation to guest edit an issue of Apex Magazine (scheduled for August 2017). I will be soliciting new stories that showcase the rich depth and diversity of science fiction, fantasy, and horror penned by Native American/First Nations authors. Apex Magazine routinely provides 12,000 words of original fiction per issue, but my special issue will deliver 20,000.

My long relationship with Apex dates back to the fourth issue (Winter 2005) of its print-edition days, when it was Apex Digest. It is with the greatest excitement that I look forward to this important project.

If you have questions or recommendations, you are welcome to contact me via my website.

eldritchhobbit: (Frankenstein)
Happy birthday to Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (30 August, 1797 – 1 February, 1851)!

Portrait of Mary Shelley


“Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it.”
- Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818)
eldritchhobbit: (Headstone/wings)
Happy birthday to J. Sheridan Le Fanu (August 28, 1814 – February 7, 1873)!

1506.jpg


“Thus fortified I might take my rest in peace. But dreams come through stone walls, light up dark rooms, or darken light ones, and their persons make their exists and their entrances as they please, and laugh at locksmiths.”

- J. Sheridan Le Fanu, Carmilla (1871)
eldritchhobbit: (Lovecraftian)
Happy birthday to H.P. Lovecraft (20 August, 1890 – 15 March, 1937)!

Lovecraft


Take my virtual walking tour of Lovecraft's Providence.

"The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown."
- H.P. Lovecraft, "Supernatural Horror in Literature" (19
eldritchhobbit: (Wuthering Heights)
Happy birthday to Emily Brontë (30 July, 1818 – 19 December, 1848)!

Wuthering Heights


“Heaven did not seem to be my home; and I broke my heart with weeping to come back to earth; and the angels were so angry that they flung me out into the middle of the heath on the top of Wuthering Heights; where I woke sobbing for joy.”
- Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights (1847)
eldritchhobbit: (illuminated manuscript)
Happy birthday to the mother of the Gothic, Ann Radcliffe (9 July, 1764 – 7 February, 1823).

Mysteries of Udolpho by Anne Radcliffe


“A well-informed mind is the best security against the contagion of folly and vice. The vacant mind is ever on the watch for relief, and ready to plunge into error, to escape from the languor of idleness. Store it with ideas, teach it the pleasure of thinking; and the temptations of the world without, will be counteracted by the gratifications derived from the world within.”
― Ann Radcliffe, The Mysteries of Udolpho (1794)
eldritchhobbit: (Waterhouse/heroines)
Happy Friday the 13th, everyone!

And happy birthday to Daphne du Maurier (13 May, 1907 – 19 April, 1989)!

Daphne du Maurier books


“I suppose sooner or later in the life of everyone comes a moment of trial. We all of us have our particular devil who rides us and torments us, and we must give battle in the end.”
― Daphne du Maurier, Rebecca (1938)
eldritchhobbit: (Orphan Black/Cosima)
Hello, everyone! Happy Friday!

* I'm delighted to be part of the ensemble cast who narrated the amazing "The Four Generations of Chang E" by Zen Cho for the latest episode of The Drabblecast. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!



* Here's a new Call for Papers that may be useful: "Monster Media in their Historical Contexts."

* If you're interested in the updates J.K. Rowling has been making at Pottermore and/or the upcoming Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them films, I recommend checking out Chris Calderon's recent "The Allegory of Fantastic Beasts" guest posts on the Hogwarts Professor blog.

* Last, I'm happy to say that my essay "His Fordship in the Capitol and Big Brother in the Districts: The Hunger Games and the Modern Dystopian Tradition" is now out in the collection Critical Insights: The Hunger Games Trilogy edited by Lana Whited.

eldritchhobbit: (Knight)
Recently Gary Dowell, editor of the wonderful Far Fetched Fables: The Audio Fantasy Fiction Magazine (sibling to StarShipSofa), invited me to contribute a fantasy-related "Looking Back on Genre History" to his podcast. It occurred to me that this was the perfect opportunity to share with everyone an almost-but-not-quite-lost work of epic Gothic fantasy: 1877's The Demon of Brockenheim; or The Enchanted Ring.

Today the second part of my two two-part introduction to The Demon of Brockenheim was posted on Far Fetched Fables. You can listen to both parts for free below.
* My Introduction to The Demon of Brockenheim, Part 1
* My Introduction to The Demon of Brockenheim, Part 2

And here for your reading pleasure is a free PDF of the novel from its publication in serial form in The Australian Journal: download The Demon of Brockenheim.

Happy listening and happy reading!



If you'd like to get your genre geek on a bit more, here are some suggestions.

Bibliography/Recommended Further Reading Related to My Demon of Brockenheim "Looking Back" Segments
- Anonymous. The Saga of the Volsungs. Jesse Byock, ed. Penguin Classics, 2000.
- Doig, James, ed. Australian Gothic : An Anthology of Australian Supernatural Fiction, 1867-1939. Equilibrium Books, 2007.
- Ellis, Markman. The History of Gothic Fiction. Edinburgh University Press, 2001.
- Fouqué, Baron de la Motte. The Magic Ring. Amy H. Sturgis, ed. Valancourt Books, 2006.
- Gelder, Kenneth and Rachael Weaver, eds. The Anthology of Colonial Australian Gothic Fiction. Melbourne University Press, 2007.
- Johnson-Woods, Toni. Beyond Ephemera: The Australian Journal (1865-1962) as Fiction Publisher. Diss. University of Queensland, 2000.
- Punter. David. The Literature of Terror: A History of Gothic Fictions from 1765 to the Present Day. Volume I: The Gothic Tradition. Longmans, 1980.
- Punter, David and Glennis Byron. The Gothic. Blackwell, 2004.
- Thomsett, Michael T. The Inquisition: A History. McFarland, 2010.
- Tolkien, J.R.R. The Lord of the Rings. Allen & Unwin. 1954, 1955.
- Yates, Frances A. The Rosicrucian Enlightenment. Routledge, 2001.
eldritchhobbit: (Knight)
Recently Gary Dowell, editor of the wonderful Far Fetched Fables: The Audio Fantasy Fiction Magazine (sibling to StarShipSofa), invited me to contribute a fantasy-related "Looking Back on Genre History" to his podcast. It occurred to me that this was the perfect opportunity to share with everyone an almost-but-not-quite-lost work of epic Gothic fantasy: 1877's The Demon of Brockenheim; or The Enchanted Ring.

You can hear Part 1 of my two-part introduction to The Demon of Brockenheim here for free on Far Fetched Fables. Part 2 will be available next week, and I will post the link when it is.

And here for your reading pleasure is a free PDF of the novel from its publication in serial form in The Australian Journal: download The Demon of Brockenheim.

Happy listening and happy reading!



If you'd like to get your genre geek on a bit more, here are some suggestions.

Bibliography/Recommended Further Reading Related to My Demon of Brockenheim "Looking Back" Segments
- Anonymous. The Saga of the Volsungs. Jesse Byock, ed. Penguin Classics, 2000.
- Doig, James, ed. Australian Gothic : An Anthology of Australian Supernatural Fiction, 1867-1939. Equilibrium Books, 2007.
- Ellis, Markman. The History of Gothic Fiction. Edinburgh University Press, 2001.
- Fouqué, Baron de la Motte. The Magic Ring. Amy H. Sturgis, ed. Valancourt Books, 2006.
- Gelder, Kenneth and Rachael Weaver, eds. The Anthology of Colonial Australian Gothic Fiction. Melbourne University Press, 2007.
- Johnson-Woods, Toni. Beyond Ephemera: The Australian Journal (1865-1962) as Fiction Publisher. Diss. University of Queensland, 2000.
- Punter. David. The Literature of Terror: A History of Gothic Fictions from 1765 to the Present Day. Volume I: The Gothic Tradition. Longmans, 1980.
- Punter, David and Glennis Byron. The Gothic. Blackwell, 2004.
- Thomsett, Michael T. The Inquisition: A History. McFarland, 2010.
- Tolkien, J.R.R. The Lord of the Rings. Allen & Unwin. 1954, 1955.
- Yates, Frances A. The Rosicrucian Enlightenment. Routledge, 2001.

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