eldritchhobbit: (SF/Space travel)
Happy birthday to Robert A. Heinlein (7 July, 1907 – 8 May, 1988)!

heinlein_juvenile_poster


“Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done. One could write a history of science in reverse by assembling the solemn pronouncements of highest authority about what could not be done and could never happen.”
- Robert A. Heinlein, The Rolling Stones (1952)
eldritchhobbit: (SF/Space travel)
Happy birthday to Robert A. Heinlein (7 July, 1907 – 8 May, 1988)!

heinlein_juvenile_poster


“Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done. One could write a history of science in reverse by assembling the solemn pronouncements of highest authority about what could not be done and could never happen.”
- Robert A. Heinlein, The Rolling Stones (1952)
eldritchhobbit: (Pretender/Wondering)
Cool Things are Extremely Cool:

- Netflix Revives Western Longmire. Woohoo! I am one happy fangirl.

- The University of Iowa is digitizing 10,000 vintage sci-fi zines dating back to the 1930s. Fantastic!

- Three Calls for Papers of potential interest: 1) on Robert A. Heinlein, 2) on the Gothic and Racism, and 3) on "It's Happening Again": Twenty-Five Years of Twin Peaks.

- FX Is Making a Television Show Out of Alan Moore's From Hell.

Alan Moore & Eddie Campbell - From Hell


- The latest episode of StarShipSofa is out - it's a jam-packed episode - and it includes my most recent "Looking Back on Genre History" segment, which celebrates the recent good news received by fans of The Pretender, Millennium, and Twin Peaks. You can download the episode via iTunes or stream/download it here.


Uncool Thing is Way Not Cool:

Cut for TMI )

The takeaway here is that most of my Spring 2015 trips and appearances - my Asheville weekend seminars, SofaCON and ConCarolinas, and likely another university campus talk in the works - won't be affected by this turn of events, but I'm very disappointed to say that it looks like Mythmoot III in January is off the table. I'm quite bummed about this.

For now I'm on the road again. Have a great one, my friends!
eldritchhobbit: (SF/Space travel)
Happy birthday to Robert A. Heinlein (7 July, 1907 – 8 May, 1988)!

heinlein_juvenile_poster


“Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done. One could write a history of science in reverse by assembling the solemn pronouncements of highest authority about what could not be done and could never happen.”
- Robert A. Heinlein, The Rolling Stones (1952)
eldritchhobbit: (Space/Jupiter)
Things that are cool:

* Scholar Michael Drout has written a most enlightening blog post clarifying his work with Tolkien's Beowulf papers, etc.: "Tolkien's Beowulf: The Real Story."

* From US Weekly: "J.K. Rowling to Pen Fantastic Beasts Trilogy as Harry Potter Spin-Off."

* From The Guardian: "Black death was not spread by rat fleas, say researchers."

* The Heinlein Society is pleased to announce its third annual scholarship essay contest for the 2014-2015 academic year. The scholarships will be awarded to undergraduate students of accredited 4-year colleges and universities majoring in engineering, math, or physical sciences (e.g. physics, chemistry), or in science fiction as literature. Here are more details.

* From Muskrat Magazine: "Indigenizing Sci Fi" by Zainab Amadahy. This is a three-part study of how science fiction/fantasy con organizers everywhere might grow and diversify their events. I'm honored to be mentioned in this piece.

* My dear friend Tony C. Smith has opened a new shop, SeaDriftSoaps. If you're after soap that is natural, unscented, cruelty-free, and handmade, check it out!

* I'll be offering my two-semester history of science fiction with Mythgard Institute again this Fall (2014) and Spring (2015). Consider yourself invited to a free online Q&A session on June 5 for more information! (Note: I'll post a reminder closer to time. Another session timed for UK convenience will take place later this summer, and I'll post about that, as well.)



Last but definitely not least, happy early birthday wishes to [livejournal.com profile] sarah531, [livejournal.com profile] vg_ford, [livejournal.com profile] tunes84, [livejournal.com profile] captnofmyheart, [livejournal.com profile] wildviolet4, [livejournal.com profile] savagedoc45, [livejournal.com profile] lalam, [livejournal.com profile] silveraspen, [livejournal.com profile] denorios, [livejournal.com profile] prettybirdy979, [livejournal.com profile] sakuraember, [livejournal.com profile] cherylmmorgan, [livejournal.com profile] muuranker, [livejournal.com profile] izhilzha, and [livejournal.com profile] justicemuffins. May you enjoy many happy returns of the day, my friends!
eldritchhobbit: (Sparkly)
Happy Tuesday, everyone!

There are two new nonfiction e-books out of possible interest to Sherlockians, both by professional pastiche authors: scientist Stephanie Osborn's exploration of the rationale behind Holmes's cocaine habit, Sherlock, Sheilas, and the Seven-Percent Solution, and Barbara Roden's collection of Holmesian essays on various topics, I Am Inclined to Think....

In science fiction news, the latest issue of Booklist has the young adult dystopia 1.4 on its cover. I just finished the book (the sequel to Human.4) and recommend it.

I was intrigued by Booklist's "Top Ten SF/Fantasy for Youth" list. Sometimes I think I'm the only one who was underwhelmed by Paolo Bacigalupi's Ship Breaker. Lest I sound like a curmudgeon, I should say that I was delighted to see that Delia Sherman's The Freedom Maze won this year's Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy. Well deserved!



In other news...

In the last day or so, a number of videos have appeared on YouTube from past meetings of PhreakNIC: Technology and Culture Exposition, the largest U.S. "hacker con" east of the Mississippi River. Several of these from the years 2003-2006 are my... well, not formal presentations exactly, but very informal talks. (These aren't professional videos like my other YouTube films; originally these simply were shown throughout the con hotel on closed-circuit TV.) It was fun reliving some terrific memories. I miss my "Got Jedi?" shirt! Ha.




"…nerds like us are allowed to be unironically enthusiastic about stuff… Nerds are allowed to love stuff, like jump-up-and-down-in-the-chair-can’t-control-yourself love it. Hank, when people call people nerds, mostly what they’re saying is ‘you like stuff.’ Which is just not a good insult at all. Like, ‘you are too enthusiastic about the miracle of human consciousness’.”
- John Green

"Being a geek is all about being honest about what you enjoy and not being afraid to demonstrate that affection. It means never having to play it cool about how much you like something. It’s basically a license to proudly emote on a somewhat childish level rather than behave like a supposed adult. Being a geek is extremely liberating."
- Simon Pegg
eldritchhobbit: (Pros/Literary Type)
Happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] clara_swift and [livejournal.com profile] goodnightlady. May you both enjoy an excellent day and a wonderful year to come!


* I stumbled across some older posts that I found to be thought-provoking regarding young adult dystopian fiction. At Tor.com, Jo Walton argued in "The Dystopic Earths of Heinlein's Juveniles" that, taken as a whole, Robert A. Heinlein's juveniles paint a rather bleak and pessimistic picture of future Earth. Cory Doctorow in BoingBoing prompted an interesting series of comments about this, and Patrick Shepherd at Hyperpat countered in "The Pessimistic Heinlein" that Heinlein only created bleak futures in order to give his young heroes opportunities and motivation for improving their own situations and often the world at large. (Note: A list of Heinlein's juveniles is here.) Do you have any thoughts on this, my friends?


* From [livejournal.com profile] read_lotr_aloud: "March 25 is Tolkien Reading Day, a day given over to the reading, and appreciation, of Tolkien's works. In honor of that day, I thought maybe we could all read and post a favorite passage from LOTR. Then, as I do with the chapter readings, I will gather links to all the readings into a master list that I will post here at Reading LOTR Aloud. This will be strictly informal - no sign ups necessary. I will post a reminder closer to the day and then on the 25th make a post where you can comment and leave a link if you do a reading. I hope some of you will take part! I already know what I am going to read!"


* I did it: I finally joined BookMooch! In many ways, I find Bookins more user friendly, and I'll definitely be using it as well, but I must say it is great to have the ability to share books internationally via BookMooch.


"Free will is a golden thread running through the frozen matrix of fixed events."
- Robert Heinlein, The Rolling Stones (1952)
eldritchhobbit: (Prisoner/Defiant)
Happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] super_chik! I hope you have a great day and many more to come.

In other news...

* The promised remake of The Prisoner isn't happening. I think I am relieved.

* SilkSoundBooks has added some new, unabridged readings of classic novels (including Susannah York's reading of Elizabeth Gaskell's My Lady Ludlow).

* Locus has posted Heinlein at 100: A Roundtable Discussion with John Clute, Gary K. Wolfe, Graham Sleight, and Charles N. Brown.


It makes no difference abroad,
The seasons fit the same,
The mornings blossom into noons,
And split their pods of flame.

Wild-flowers kindle in the woods,
The brooks brag all the day;
No blackbird bates his jargoning
For passing Calvary.

Auto-da-fe and judgment
Are nothing to the bee;
His separation from his rose
To him seems misery.

- Emily Dickinson
eldritchhobbit: (Neil Gaiman/Trust the story)
* I highly recommend this fantastic podcast: The Classic Tales Podcast. These are unabridged, classic short stories by the likes of Mary Shelley, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Thomas Hardy, and H.G. Wells, read by professional actor B.J. Harrison. (Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] sword_gryff.)

* For those who love The Dark is Rising books by Susan Cooper and are looking forward to the film adaptation this fall, there is disheartening news.

* This month's Locus includes "Yesterday's Tomorrows: Robert A. Heinlein" by Graham Sleight. Although I disagree with Sleight in some ways, I found the article to be thought-provoking and well worth reading.


I'm more than prepared to believe that Heinlein established, pretty much singlehandedly, the language in which modern science fiction is told. The tragedy of his later career is, visibly, that of seeing the gap between what he had believed in and what the world actually did.
- Graham Sleight, "Yesterday's Tomorrow's: Robert A. Heinlein"

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