eldritchhobbit: (Me/Sparkly)
My latest science fiction narration is up on the new episode of Escape Pod: the beautiful story “That Game We Played During the War” by Carrie Vaughn. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

EP581: That Game We Played During the War: Escape Pod
eldritchhobbit: (SW/Obi-Wan/Not Defeat)
My latest “Looking Back at Genre History” is up on the new episode of the StarShipSofa podcast. It’s a standalone piece, but it also serves as a follow up to my recent interview on the My Star Wars Story podcast. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

eldritchhobbit: (Default)
My latest science fiction narration is up here on the new episode of Escape Pod. I read the fantastic story “Cherry Squid” by Celeste Hollister. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!
eldritchhobbit: (Star Wars/Obi-Wan/Truths)
It's a true and honor and delight to be the focus of Episode 25 of the brilliant My Star Wars Story podcast. What great fun I had recording this! If you listen (via iTunes or here at the podcast's website), I hope you enjoy!

eldritchhobbit: (Star Wars/binary suns)
I was recently asked for a list of my Star Wars works that are available online, so I thought I'd post that here. I'm happy to say that more is coming very soon!

Read December 2015 Reason Magazine article "Star Wars, Remixed" here.



See/hear my August 2015 Mythgard Academy guest lecture on Star Wars, "The Jedi, the Cowboy, and... Thomas Edison?" here. (This is also available via iTunes U.)

Listen to my "Looking Back on Genre History" segments on the StarShipSofa podcast about Star Wars here:
- "From Republic to Empire in Star Wars"
- "Inspirations for the Jedi in Star Wars, Part 1"
- "Inspirations for the Jedi in Star Wars, Part 2"

See my Star Wars YouTube Videos here:
- Star Wars: Does Fear Cost Us Our Liberty?
- Star Wars: Behind the History
- Star Wars: Good and Evil

Hear my interview as scholarly guest on NPR's "Talk of The Nation" national program, (May 19, 2005) here: "The End of Star Wars, But Not Its Fans
eldritchhobbit: (Frankenstein)
First of all, happy 199th birthday to what is perhaps my favorite novel and definitely the pioneering work of modern science fiction, Frankenstein! Here are five reasons to celebrate Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley today.



Also, the latest episode of StarShipSofa includes my new "Looking Back on Genre History," part one of a two-part discussion of the relationship of one of my very favorite authors, Lois McMaster Bujold, to fandom (and fan fiction, in particular). Here it is! If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

(And speaking of StarShipSofa, heartfelt thanks to those of you who have helped make Everyone: Worlds Without Walls a reality! We're most grateful to you!)

Last but not least, it seems that I've embarked on an in-depth study of the films of award-winning actor-director-writer Jiang Wen, sort of a personal (and multi-month-long) film festival that also includes reading the popular and scholarly analyses of his work that are available in English. (I've found that his films are kind of dream dining for someone who does intellectual history, though I'm having to brush up a bit on my knowledge of recent China, which, hey, is a good thing.) When that's all done, expect a report, including breakdown of his films with brief reviews/reactions. Consider yourself warned, ha!



I am still recovering from The Ick That Wouldn't Die, but I'm much better than I was. And we're expecting snow tomorrow, which makes me very happy indeed. I hope all of you are doing well, my friends!
eldritchhobbit: (Dr. Horrible/Coming Along)
The Hocus Pocus Comics Kickstarter has begun! Please check out this fundraiser for Houdini's Silver Dollar Misfits, a graphic novel for all ages! Gravity Falls meets Harry Potter in this magical action-adventure mystery created by Harvey-nominated writer Dwight L. MacPherson.

All pledge tiers come with rewards, and the first begins at just $1. Thanks for considering supporting us!






In other news, my latest "Looking Back on Genre History" segment, which reviews five 2016 documentaries on Star Trek and Star Wars history, is up now on the latest episode of StarShipSofa. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!
eldritchhobbit: (Sherlock/John & Sherlock computer)
How about Sherlock!?! Wow. Okay, on to links...

I had the pleasure and privilege of narrating a very powerful science fiction story, "In a Manner of Speaking" by Charity Tahmaseb, for Escape Pod. This one will stick with me a long time (in a very good way). One of the podcast listeners on the Escape Pod forum called it "*so good*. Like, be late to work because you have to hear the rest of the story good." I agree. My narration went online this week on Episode 556. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

In other news, the Hocus Pocus Comics website is aliiiive! Aliiive, I say! You're invited to check us out. Thanks!

eldritchhobbit: (Rogue One/Baze smiling)
It's time for my annual navel-gazing post, in which I take stock of the year beyond my university teaching for my own information/edification.

So here's my reading, podcasting, and published work this year.





Below the cut: lists! )
eldritchhobbit: (Elsewhere)
Today my first narration for the Cast of Wonders podcast is available on Episode 221. I read the wonderful tale "The Jungle Between" by Holly Schofield. If you listen, I hope you enjoy! This is the final dinosaur-centric episode in the podcast's "Dinovember" celebration.

Just in case Cast of Wonders is new to you, I should mention that it's a Young Adult fiction podcast featuring tales of the fantastic. ("The Jungle Between," for example, is YA science fiction.) It's a terrific podcast, and if you know any young people or adult lovers of YA literature, I encourage you to share the news about it. Cast of Wonders is part of the Escape Artists family of podcasts.

eldritchhobbit: (Star Wars/Luke/Watching You)
I am counting down the hours until Rogue One!


In other news...

Here are some interesting links I wanted to share.

- from Science Fiction Ruminations: "Three SF Short Stories Pre-1969 by Women Authors"

- from The Baltimore Sun: "Newest 'Poe Toaster' to Return for Edgar Allan Poe's Birthday Tribute"

- from The Atlantic: "The Science Fiction that Came before Science"


And in personal news..

My latest "Looking Back on Genre History" segment -- which is about Firefly, Serenity, the Frontier Thesis, and Ron Glass -- is now up here at StarShipSofa. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

Last year I filmed some videos about Star Wars for the Learn Liberty project with the Institute for Humane Studies at George Mason University. Two of these went up on YouTube last year ("Star Wars: Does Fear Cost Us Our Liberty?" and "Star Wars: Behind the History"). Now the other two are available on YouTube: "Good and Evil in Star Wars" and "Warrior, Librarian, Jedi Master."



eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Walter/Self-Medicated)
A lot has been going on here, but pretty much everything pales beside the specter of the Western North Carolina wildfires. What's happening to the Blue Ridge Mountains and the wildlife there is absolutely tragic, and the heroism of the men and women fighting the flames cannot be overstated. We're currently in what's been classified as a Red Zone for "unhealthy" air quality due to the smoke and ash.


In happier news...

- I was interviewed for this article by Tiffany Gee Lewis of The Deseret News: The Cultural Impacts of Harry Potter on the Next Generation."

- My latest "Looking Back on Genre History" segment, which focuses on the work of Sheri S. Tepper, is up on the new episode of StarShipSofa here. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

- Here are a few Calls for Papers that may be of interest.
--- Medicine and Mystery: The Dark Side of Science in Victorian Fiction
--- Serenity: Essays on Joss Whedon’s "Big Damn Movie"
--- At the Mercy of Monsters: Essays on the Rise of Supernatural Procedural Dramas


Lastly, on my trip to speak in D.C. a couple of weeks ago, I stopped off at one of my favorite places in the world, The Poe Museum. Here's Poe in the Poe Shrine, with the morning's pennies left by visitors.

eldritchhobbit: (HP/Ravenclaw/sadhappydeep)
I have two items of news today. First, my unabridged narration of Beth Goder's wonderful time-twisting science fiction tale "Murder or a Duck" is up here on Episode 545 of Escape Pod. It's a terrifically entertaining and clever story, and it was great fun to record! If you listen, I hope you enjoy.

Second, my latest critical essay, "Hogwarts in America," is now on newsstands in the December 2016 issue of Reason. (This is the essay to which I referred in my recent interview on the MuggleNet Academia podcast.)

I'll post again when this article goes up online.

eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Hand)
Last call for entering this week's new book giveaway!

Now it's list time again! Here are my picks for the spooky podcasts you don't want to miss this Halloween.

I've already discussed Welcome to Night Vale in this prior post, so I won't revisit it here. On to new recommendations! Unless noted otherwise, all of these are free.

al.jpg



In no particular order...

* Astonishing Legends: One of my new 2016 addictions, this podcast's mission is to take a look at legendary, strange, and unusual events from history and interview people who’ve had close encounters with the unexplained. Hosts Scott and Forrest strive to bring you everything that’s entertaining about those stories and remind you that it’s okay to laugh at scary stories -- and, respectfully, even the people that tell them. That said, this is a serious and skeptical podcast. Put your headphones on, settle in for your commute, and get ready to experience a show like nothing you’ve ever heard before. I discovered this podcast while looking for more analyses of the Dyatlov Pass mystery, and I was hooked. My favorite series of episodes thus far focuses on the Somerton Mann mystery. If you could have drinks with the Lone Gunmen, I'd expect the discussion would sound a bit like this podcast. (That's a compliment, if you were wondering.)

* The H.P. Lovecraft Literary Podcast: In each weekly podcast, Chris Lackey and Chad Fifer discuss a specific H.P. Lovecraft story – what it’s about, how it reads, why it may have been written and what other works of art it’s influenced. Since concluding Lovecraft’s stories, they’ve been covering other weird fiction that inspired the author, mostly those referenced in his essay "Supernatural Horror in Literature." They regularly have talented guest readers and contributing composers for their music sections. The majority of the Lovecraft episodes are free. Three of the four monthly episodes are now subscription-only, but they are well, well worth the modest cost. They recently completed a full reading of Wuthering Heights!

* Saturday Frights: The nerdtastic [livejournal.com profile] gods_lil_rocker put this on my radar, and I'm grateful! Each week the co-hosts discuss a particular horror movie or horror-themed TV episode from the Retroist Vault for your listening enjoyment. This will put you in the Halloween mood for certain.

* Interference by Eric Luke: Another of my brilliant former graduate students, April, suggested this to me, and it's sublime. Don't miss this! The podiobook unfolds in twenty-four episodes, and then it's done. Described as "an experiment in audio horror" (oh yeah!), here's the tantalizing blurb: "SOMETHING wants in. To your head. Through this audiobook. Ethan, a digital sound engineer in Los Angeles, becomes aware that his life is unraveling when the audiobook he's listening to reveals his deepest, darkest secrets, escalating until the narrator addresses him directly, threatening to destroy him from within. Vivian, a single mother running an antique store in San Francisco, listens to her audiobook to distract herself from missing her young daughter, but is shaken when the narrative is interrupted by her daughter's voice, faintly calling for help. Ethan and Vivian are drawn together as they fight to solve a generation-spanning conspiracy that begins with a boy listening to the Orson Welles broadcast of War of the Worlds in 1938 and evolves through the latest innovations in digital technology..." I love how the individual weird tales link together into a spooky, intense, and deeply humane conclusion.

* Rippercast: The Whitechapel Murders Podcast: This is a treat for those of you who are interested in the history of forensics, true crime, Victorian England/London, etc. A roundtable of author/academic presenters, co-hosts, and special guests discuss topics related to the Whitechapel Murders, Jack the Ripper, Victorian British history, and whatever else suits their fancy. Lately the podcast has been sharing the monthly scholarly talks recorded at the London meetings of the Whitechapel Society 1888 and at various international conferences focused on related themes. If you want to hear the latest in research from those who literally wrote the books on their respective topics related to Jack the Ripper's times and context, you'll want to listen.

* Kat & Curt's TV Re-View: In this weekly podcast, brilliant bloggers Curtis Weyant and Katherine Sas introduce Buffy the Vampire Slayer or Angel and Doctor Who to each other, watching one episode of each per week, sharing fannish delight and critical analysis. Curt, a long-time Whedon devotee and scholar, introduces the show to Kat, and analytical Whovian Kat acquaints Curt with the Doctor. Join them for a journey through time, space, and Sunnydale as they battle demons, aliens, and the inscrutable process of creating quality narrative television.

* Tales to Terrify: This weekly audio magazine is one of StarShipSofa's siblings in the District of Wonders. I'm terribly saddened to say that we lost our friend and comrade, author and host Larry Santoro ("the Vincent Price of podcasts!"). He is greatly missed. But the podcast continues to soldier (lurch? stagger? insert your scary verb here) on in his memory. It includes the best of contemporary horror fiction and nonfiction. It was my distinct honor to represent TTT this year at the Hugo Awards Ceremony, where it was a finalist for the Best Fancast Award. (In addition, have narrated three haunting stories for this podcast. Follow the links to hear my reading of “After the Ape” by Stephen Volk, my reading of “Jewels in the Dust” by Peter Crowther, and my reading of “Payback” by P.D. Cacek.)

* Lovecraft eZine Podcast: This is the podcast version of the wonderful and weekly live show produced by the incomparable Lovecraft eZine. Listen as stellar guests discuss cosmic horror, weird fiction, Lovecraftian horror, the Cthulhu Mythos, and related topics.

* MonsterTalk: This is the science show about monsters — a free audio podcast that critically examines the science behind cryptozoological (and legendary) creatures, such as Bigfoot, the Loch Ness Monster, and werewolves. Hosted by Blake Smith, Ben Radford, and Dr. Karen Stollznow, MonsterTalk interviews the scientists and investigators who shine a spotlight on the things that go bump in the night. The episode airing dates average out to mean a new show once a month, sometimes more. (Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] ankh_hpl for introducing me to this great show.)

* Classic Tales: Edgar Allan Poe, H.P. Lovecraft, Wilkie Collins, Arthur Conan Doyle, Mary Shelley: what's not to love? This is a fantastic weekly podcast featuring B.J. Harrison's unabridged readings of great — and often haunting and Halloween-friendly — fiction.

* Atlanta Radio Theatre Company: Founded in 1984, ARTC is a staple at venues such as Dragon*Con and has a standing program year-round, performing adaptations of works by authors such as H.P. Lovecraft and H.G. Wells live. ARTC podcasts its fantastic productions.



* Pseudopod: One of the oldest horror podcasts and still one of the best, Pseudopod presents fine short horror in audio form weekly.

* Skeptoid: This podcast shines the lights of logic and reason into the dark shadows. Each weekly episode focuses on a single phenomenon — an urban legend, a paranormal claim, etc. — that you may have heard of, and it explains the factual scientific reality. To put it another way, we the listeners are Fox Mulder, and Skeptoid kindly serves as our Dana Scully.

Now it's your turn. What other spooky podcasts do you recommend?
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween/trick or treat)
If you missed the book giveaway yesterday, you still have time to enter!

It's [livejournal.com profile] gods_lil_rocker's fault that I'm addicted to the Welcome to Night Vale podcast (and its wonderfully weird related books, as well). This is a twice-monthly podcast in the style of community updates for the small desert town of Night Vale, featuring local weather, news, announcements from the Sheriff's Secret Police, mysterious lights in the night sky, dark hooded figures with unknowable powers, an omnipotent Glow Cloud (All hail!), and cultural events.

Think Lake Woebegone meets Stephen King.

If you haven't listened, October is the perfect month to give it a try, and here's a sample to whet your appetite. If you have listened, you may want to try the sister podcasts The Orbiting Human Circus (Of the Air) (starting October 12!), Within the Wires, and Alice Isn't Dead, and here's a walk down memory lane...

From Episode 4: "P.T.A. Meeting"
Introductory Word: "The sun has grown so very, very old. How long cold, fading death? How long?"
Closing Proverb: "What has four legs in the morning, two legs at noon, and three legs in the evening? I don't know, but I trapped it in my bedroom. Send help."

From Episode 25: "One Year Later"
Introductory Word: "A friendly desert community, where the sun is still hot, the moon still beautiful, and mysterious lights still pass overhead while we all pretend to sleep."
Closing Proverb: "Fun game. Say 'toy boat' over and over. Do it for the rest of your life. Retreat from society and live on alms. Whisper 'toy boat' as you die."


Source.


From Episode 30: "Dana"
Introductory Word: "It takes heart. It takes guts. It also takes cash. It just needs your payment immediately."
Closing Proverb: "Look to the sky. You will not find answers there, but you will certainly see what everyone is screaming about."

From Episode 43: "The Visitor"
Introductory Word: "Listen to your heart. You can hear it deep under the earth, creaking and heaving, with roots snapping and birds flapping quickly away."
Closing Proverb: "You won't sleep when you're dead, either."

From the live show "The Debate"
Introductory Word: "We found a little piece of heaven here. It is black, smooth, oblong. It hums a soft, but discordant note, and we are afraid to touch it."
Closing Proverb: "Don't judge a book by its cover, by its leather cover, by its human skin-looking cover. Don't ever judge that book."
eldritchhobbit: (Prisoner/Defiant)
My most recent "Looking Back on Genre History" segment on StarShipSofa discusses the 1935 dystopia It Can't Happen Here. It's here on Episode 451. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

eldritchhobbit: (DS9/Weyoun)
Because I'm bursting with Star Trek love today on the franchise's 50th birthday, and just in case you're looking for some free Star Trek discussion, I thought I'd repost these Trek-related "Looking Back in Genre History" StarShipSofa podcast segments of mine. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

First, my tribute to the weird and wonderful multi-crossover Ishmael by Barbara Hambly, a most unusual Star Trek novel, and one of my very favorite ones: here it is!

Second, inspired by my essay "The Sword in the Starship: Arthuriana in Four Incarnations of Star Trek" (published in Winedark Sea), here is my two-part discussion of Arthuriana and Star Trek.
- Part 1
- Part 2

Third, inspired by my essay "If This Is the (Final) Frontier, Where Are the Natives?" (published in Star Trek and History), here is my three-part discussion of Native America and Star Trek.
- Part 1
- Part 2
- Part 3

Thanks for letting me share these with you.

And last, just for nostalgia and laughs, here is the most fangirlish photo I think I have. This is me with the wonderful Star Trek: Deep Space Nine "baddie" triumvirate of Jeffrey Combs (Weyoun), Casey Biggs (Damar), and Marc Alaimo (Gul Dukat). That was a very fun day!


eldritchhobbit: (HP/Dumbledore)
Recently I was invited to share thoughts related to the controversial question of how J.K. Rowling has addressed Indigenous America in her two recent Pottermore works ("History of Magic in North America" and "Ilvermorny School of Witchcraft and Wizardry") in an extended interview on MuggleNet Academia with hosts Keith Hawk and the Hogwarts Professor himself, John Granger, as well as my fellow scholar, Allison Mills of the University of British Columbia. It meant a lot to me to be a part of this important conversation.

I hope you'll check out MuggleNet Academia Lesson #51: "Harry Potter and the Indian in the Cupboard"! If you listen, I hope you enjoy.

eldritchhobbit: (Dr. Horrible/Ph.D.)
I'm back from an action-packed Worldcon, just in time for the start of a new semester!

My stand-alone academic presentation from the con, "His Fordship in the Capitol and Big Brother in the Districts: How The Hunger Games' World of Tomorrow Builds on SF's Classic Past," is now available for free on the latest episode of StarShipSofa. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

And here is Kaitlyn at Worldcon, her very first (but not her last!) con. Steampunk Star Wars shirt? Check. TARDIS? Check. Happy smile? Check.

eldritchhobbit: (TFA/BB-8)
My latest "Looking Back on Genre History" segment is up today on StarShipSofa's Episode 440. I discuss the two classic (and non-Star Wars) films director Rian Johnson has named as significant inspirations for Star Wars Episode VIII. (Fear not: there are no Star Wars spoilers/speculations in the segment.)

If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

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