eldritchhobbit: (Edgar Allan Poe/Raven)
Happy birthday to Edgar Allan Poe (19 January, 1809 – 7 October, 1849)!

"Poe Returning to Boston" - L3007227


"Alone"
by Edgar Allan Poe

From childhood's hour I have not been
As others were--I have not seen
As others saw--I could not bring
My passions from a common spring.
From the same source I have not taken
My sorrow; I could not awaken
My heart to joy at the same tone;
And all I lov'd, I loved alone.
Then--in my childhood--in the dawn
Of a most stormy life--was drawn
From ev'ry depth of good and ill
The mystery which binds me still:
From the torrent, or the fountain,
From the red cliff of the mountain,
From the sun that 'round me roll'd
In its autumn tint of gold--
From the lightning in the sky
As it pass'd me flying by--
From the thunder and the storm,
And the cloud that took the form
(When the rest of Heaven was blue)
Of a demon in my view.
eldritchhobbit: (Star Wars/Luke/Watching You)
I am counting down the hours until Rogue One!


In other news...

Here are some interesting links I wanted to share.

- from Science Fiction Ruminations: "Three SF Short Stories Pre-1969 by Women Authors"

- from The Baltimore Sun: "Newest 'Poe Toaster' to Return for Edgar Allan Poe's Birthday Tribute"

- from The Atlantic: "The Science Fiction that Came before Science"


And in personal news..

My latest "Looking Back on Genre History" segment -- which is about Firefly, Serenity, the Frontier Thesis, and Ron Glass -- is now up here at StarShipSofa. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

Last year I filmed some videos about Star Wars for the Learn Liberty project with the Institute for Humane Studies at George Mason University. Two of these went up on YouTube last year ("Star Wars: Does Fear Cost Us Our Liberty?" and "Star Wars: Behind the History"). Now the other two are available on YouTube: "Good and Evil in Star Wars" and "Warrior, Librarian, Jedi Master."



eldritchhobbit: (Edgar Allan Poe/Raven)
How about starting December with some good news?!?

I am absolutely delighted to be a part of this.

Hocus Pocus Comics Launches With Edgar Allan Poe and Houdini Comics: The Imaginary Voyages of Edgar Allan Poe marks debut for innovative digital media publishing company

Lakeland, FL: Start-Up Comic Publishers Hocus Pocus Comics will release their dynamic debut comic, The Imaginary Voyages of Edgar Allan Poe, and their website, hpcomics.net, on January 1st, 2017. This begins their first wave of properties to be sold on ComiXology, with the publishers releasing four additional titles throughout 2017.



The Imaginary Voyages of Edgar Allan Poe is a rebranding of the Harvey and Eagle Award-nominated Surreal Adventures of Edgar Allan Poo created by Hocus Pocus Comics’ founder, Dwight L. MacPherson. The Imaginary Voyages of Edgar Allan Poe offers a twisted glimpse into the dream-life of America's greatest fantasist, Edgar Allan Poe, in the darkest time of his life. Book 1 will be reprinted as Book 1, Issues 1-4 (with an exclusive cover by David Hartman, Rob Zombie album cover artist and producer of Phantasm: Ravager). Book 2 will feature an updated script and all-new art by Luis Czerniawski (Transformers: Evolutions, Kolchak the Nightstalker: The Forgotten Lore of Edgar Allan Poe) and Book 3 is a brand-new story that will finally complete MacPherson’s magnum opus. As he says, “Many readers have asked me what happened to Book 3, as they loved the characters and story. I’ve often joked that it’s a ‘lost book.’ Well, the time is right to finally complete this epic, and I couldn’t be more excited to share this ‘lost book’ with the world!”

Hocus Pocus Comics’ second title, Houdini’s Silver Dollar Misfits, is described by MacPherson as “Harry Potter meets Gravity Falls.” The first issue will be released this spring, and it will feature a cover by David Hartman and interior art by Mathieu Benoit (Jim Reaper: Week One, Lil’ Hellions: A Day at the Zoo).

Speaking on Hocus Pocus Comics’ mission, MacPherson says, “I believe that telling incredible stories is fundamental to a successful publishing company. There are many publishers pumping out a whole lot of mediocre properties, but we would rather take our time, stay small, and produce 3-4 extremely well-written, beautifully-illustrated books per year that will stick with readers long after they finish reading. We believe that good stories are magical, and we will do everything in our power to conjure some truly unforgettable magic.” To that end, MacPherson has put together several stellar teams working on books of several different genres. Hocus Pocus Comics’ motto is Imaginatio est Magicae (Imagination is Magic). Their goal is to create the future’s myths and legends, one comic at a time.

President and Publisher: Dwight L. MacPherson
Comic creator, writer, and editor Dwight L. MacPherson has been one of the most prolific writing professionals for more than 10 years. A longtime advocate of webcomics and digital media, his steampunk webcomic, Sidewise (DC Comics), won the June 2009 Zuda competition. He has also seen his creator-owned properties published by Image Comics, IDW Publishing, and many others. For more information, visit his website.

Editor-in-Chief: Amy H. Sturgis
Amy H. Sturgis holds a Ph.D. in intellectual history from Vanderbilt University, teaches at Lenoir-Rhyne University, and specializes in Science Fiction/Fantasy and Native American Studies. The author of four books and over fifty essays, and the editor of six books, Sturgis has won awards for her scholarship (The Imperishable Flame Award for J.R.R. Tolkien Scholarship), journalism (Best Magazine Review/Criticism/Column Award from the Los Angeles Press Club), and podcasting (The Sofanaut Award from listeners of the Hugo Award-winning StarShipSofa). For more information, visit her website.

Creative Director: Bruce Brown
Bruce Brown is the creator and writer of Howard Lovecraft and the Frozen Kingdom, now a motion picture. He is also the co-writer (with Dwight L. MacPherson) of Howard Lovecraft and the Undersea Kingdom, which is now in pre-production. Several of Brown’s properties have been published by Image Comics and Arcana Comics. He has multiple properties currently in production as well as a spin-off to the wildly successful Howard Lovecraft series.

Production Manager: J.M. Bryan
J. M. Bryan is a writer and designer. He has an Associates in the Arts degree from Jackson College and a Bachelor of Theology w/minor in Language from Michigan Baptist Seminary. He spends his days with his wife and two children and his nights pouring his imagination onto paper. He is currently writing two comic series.

Vice President, Administration: Rebecca MacPherson
Rebecca MacPherson has over seven years of TV/Film and Theatre Production experience from her tenure at both Tribune Studios and Fox Studios. An NAACP Award for Best Local Producer nominee for the Los Angeles production of Stage Directions, she worked with Academy Award-winning actor Denzel Washington as Production Secretary on his directorial debut, Antwone Fisher, for Fox Searchlight Films.

For more information on Hocus Pocus Comics, please contact: info.hpcomics@gmail.com

Follow Hocus Pocus Comics on Twitter.
Visit Hocus Pocus Comics on Patreon.
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Walter/Self-Medicated)
A lot has been going on here, but pretty much everything pales beside the specter of the Western North Carolina wildfires. What's happening to the Blue Ridge Mountains and the wildlife there is absolutely tragic, and the heroism of the men and women fighting the flames cannot be overstated. We're currently in what's been classified as a Red Zone for "unhealthy" air quality due to the smoke and ash.


In happier news...

- I was interviewed for this article by Tiffany Gee Lewis of The Deseret News: The Cultural Impacts of Harry Potter on the Next Generation."

- My latest "Looking Back on Genre History" segment, which focuses on the work of Sheri S. Tepper, is up on the new episode of StarShipSofa here. If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

- Here are a few Calls for Papers that may be of interest.
--- Medicine and Mystery: The Dark Side of Science in Victorian Fiction
--- Serenity: Essays on Joss Whedon’s "Big Damn Movie"
--- At the Mercy of Monsters: Essays on the Rise of Supernatural Procedural Dramas


Lastly, on my trip to speak in D.C. a couple of weeks ago, I stopped off at one of my favorite places in the world, The Poe Museum. Here's Poe in the Poe Shrine, with the morning's pennies left by visitors.

eldritchhobbit: (Ripper/neglect)
Congratulations to Theodric, who won the first Halloween-friendly book giveaway. Now it's time for another one!

To enter, you need to be 1) over the age of eighteen, 2) not me (or my doppleganger, Mirror Universe self, alternate universe self, evil twin, or future ghost), and 3) living somewhere on the planet Earth (because shipping costs to the International Space Station are outrageous).

The winner gets to choose one of these vintage paperbacks (both in great condition, tight binding and clean text, from a smoke-free home), and I will ship it immediately.


Option 1: Fear Itself edited by Jeff Gelb (1995)

Official Description: "America's masters of horror confess their most secret terrors in 21 blood-chilling stories. This collection concerns the fears that prey on ordinary people every day: plane crashes, intruders, spiders, snakes, etc. Fear Itself features works by Nancy A. Collins, Rex Miller, Thomas F. Monteleone, Joyce Carol Oates, Rick Hautala, Graham Masterson, Max Allan Collins, and others."


Option 2: Young Blood edited by Mike Baker (1994)

Official Description: "Youthful vision is the theme of this chilling anthology in which every story was written before the author's thirty-first birthday...

* A decaying bayou mansion hides a gruesome secret
* The dead rise from their tombs to form their own street gang
* A bookstore deals in rare and dangerous books
* You've heard of the tooth fairy - now meet the eye fairy

"Enter these darkly imaginative realms of terror. Whether the classic youthful gems of master writers, or the original tales of talented newcomers, they may just scare you into an early grave. This collection includes stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Robert E. Howard, Robert Bloch, and more."




The giveaway is open now and ends on Friday, October 21.

Here it is!

a Rafflecopter giveaway


Here's a Discussion Question for you: What's the scariest tale you've ever read? (Intentionally scary, that is: I'm not counting badly written/poorly edited stuff.) In other words, what's your most creeptastic book or story recommendation?


"It was a cold, desolate night, the kind that wouldn't just turn its back on terrible goings-on, but would stand by and watch."
- A Taste for Monsters by Matthew J. Kirby
eldritchhobbit: (Edgar Allan Poe/Raven)
Be on the lookout tomorrow for a giveaway!

Now, back to Poe...

Are you a fan of adult coloring books?

The Everyday Goth has a terrific suggestion list of Goth coloring books here.

Cleverpedia has another great list of the best Halloween coloring books for adults.

I'll add my own recommendation. Recently I had the good fortune to encounter the brand new Edgar Allan Poe: An Adult Coloring Book by the talented Odessa Begay. It pairs beautiful illustrations with compelling quotes from Poe's work. It's absolutely gorgeous.

You can click on the images below to make them larger.

2016-09-19 19.47.21.jpg 2016-09-19 19.47.21.jpg


For today's quote, here's a page from the coloring book.

2016-09-19 19.47.21.jpg
eldritchhobbit: (Edgar Allan Poe/Writing)
On this day in 1849, Edgar Allan Poe died at the age of forty under mysterious circumstances.

For more information, read "Mysterious for Evermore" by Matthew Pearl, an article on Poe's death from The Telegraph. Pearl is the author of a fascinating novel about the subject, The Poe Shadow.

Seven years ago, on the occasion of Poe's 200th birthday, I took over the StarShipSofa Audio Science Fiction Magazine to host an hour-long tribute to this pioneer of the short story, luminary of Gothic horror, father of detective fiction, and giant of science fiction. You can listen to the podcast here at the StarShipSofa website, or download it here, or access it via iTunes. If you listen, I hope you enjoy my celebration of Poe's life, works, and legacy!

Here is some more Poe-related free audio from yours truly:
* Free for adoption, here is my narration of Poe's "Mellonta Tauta." If you listen, I hope you enjoy!
* In this episode of StarShipSofa, I review the "Madness: Insanity in the Works of Edgar Allan Poe" temporary exhibit at The Poe Museum, a place I always love to visit. I thought this was a very insightful exhibit, and in my "Looking Back on Genre History" segment I try to pass some of those insights along to listeners. If you check it out, I hope you enjoy!

While we're talking Poe, I invite you to vote on my Goodreads list of "Fiction Featuring Poe as a Character."


Source.


The following are some of my favorite links about Edgar Allan Poe:
* PoeStories.com: An Exploration of Short Stories by Edgar Allan Poe
* The Poe Museum of Richmond
* The Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore

Here is the Biography documentary special devoted to Poe.



If I had to name my favorite Poe work, the Dupin tales would be high on my list, as would "The Premature Burial" and "The Masque of the Red Death," but I think "The Fall of the House of Usher" would have to be my choice for my favorite story. My favorite Poe poem is "Alone."

What is your favorite work by Poe?

What was it --I paused to think --what was it that so unnerved me in the contemplation of the House of Usher? It was a mystery all insoluble; nor could I grapple with the shadowy fancies that crowded upon me as I pondered. I was forced to fall back upon the unsatisfactory conclusion, that while, beyond doubt, there are combinations of very simple natural objects which have the power of thus affecting us, still the analysis of this power lies among considerations beyond our depth. It was possible, I reflected, that a mere different arrangement of the particulars of the scene, of the details of the picture, would be sufficient to modify, or perhaps to annihilate its capacity for sorrowful impression; and, acting upon this idea, I reined my horse to the precipitous brink of a black and lurid tarn that lay in unruffled lustre by the dwelling, and gazed down --but with a shudder even more thrilling than before --upon the remodelled and inverted images of the gray sedge, and the ghastly tree-stems, and the vacant and eye-like windows.
- Edgar Allan Poe, "The Fall of the House of Usher" (1839)
eldritchhobbit: (Edgar Allan Poe/Writing)
Happy birthday to Edgar Allan Poe (19 January, 1809 – 7 October, 1849)!

"Poe Returning to Boston" - L3007227


"Alone"
by Edgar Allan Poe

From childhood's hour I have not been
As others were--I have not seen
As others saw--I could not bring
My passions from a common spring.
From the same source I have not taken
My sorrow; I could not awaken
My heart to joy at the same tone;
And all I lov'd, I loved alone.
Then--in my childhood--in the dawn
Of a most stormy life--was drawn
From ev'ry depth of good and ill
The mystery which binds me still:
From the torrent, or the fountain,
From the red cliff of the mountain,
From the sun that 'round me roll'd
In its autumn tint of gold--
From the lightning in the sky
As it pass'd me flying by--
From the thunder and the storm,
And the cloud that took the form
(When the rest of Heaven was blue)
Of a demon in my view.
eldritchhobbit: (Coffee)
* From the Edgar Allan Poe Museum: Are you a writer who has been inspired by Poe? Send us your poetry and flash fiction that demonstrate his influence, whether you’ve been inspired by Poe’s use of the grotesque, his theory of the unified effect, or his pioneering work in science fiction and the detective story. No matter what he wrote, Poe imbued his work with a relentless creative spirit—that’s what we’re hoping to find in your submissions. Learn more here.

* From Simon & Schuster: In celebration of Star Trek’s 50th anniversary in 2016, publisher Simon & Schuster is bringing back the popular fan fiction writing contest, Strange New Worlds! Here is your unique opportunity to present to this world and beyond that special Star Trek story that has never been told. Learn more here.

* From Apex Publications: Announcing the open call for submissions for the upcoming Upside Down: Inverted Tropes in Storytelling anthology. This collection is edited by Monica Valentinelli and Jaym Gates, and will be coming in 2016 from Apex Publications. There have been quite a few discussions in science fiction and fantasy addressing the idea of tropes and cliches, from whether they’re good or bad to how they change over time. Upside Down: Inverted Tropes in Storytelling is a collection of stories that aims to subvert many of the popular tropes and cliches to show them in a new light. Each story in our collection will be an author’s creative examination of a specific trope that is prevalent in science fiction, horror, and fantasy. Examples of tropes include some well-defined character tropes, but also storytelling tropes that lazily incorporate race, gender, religion, etc. Learn more here.

* Also from Apex Publications: Apex Publications seeks submissions for Undead: A Poetry Anthology of Ghouls, Ghosts, and More. Editors Bianca Lynne Spriggs (Apex Magazine’s poetry editor) and Katerina Stoykova-Klemer welcome your specters, apparitions, zombies, wraiths, phantoms, thought forms and anything (or anyone) animate but no longer living. Learn more here.
eldritchhobbit: (Edgar Allan Poe/Raven)
Today my latest "Looking Back into Genre History" segment is available on the newest episode of StarShipSofa. It's my review of the "Madness: Insanity in the Works of Edgar Allan Poe" temporary exhibit I saw last month at The Poe Museum, a place I always love to visit. I thought this was a very insightful exhibit, and in my segment I try to pass some of those insights along to listeners. If you check it out, I hope you enjoy!*

When I exited the Memorial Building there, I saw one of the Poe Museum's two black cats (either Edgar or Pluto, I'm not sure which). Very atmospheric! So I took this photo.



"I became insane, with long intervals of horrible sanity." - Poe to George W. Eveleth, 1848

* My segment begins 1 hour and 5 minutes into the show, but this episode is packed with science fictional goodness, so I encourage you to take in the whole thing!
eldritchhobbit: (Edgar Allan Poe/Writing)
On this day in 1849, Edgar Allan Poe died at the age of forty under mysterious circumstances.

For more information, read "Mysterious for Evermore" by Matthew Pearl, an article on Poe's death from The Telegraph. Pearl is the author of a fascinating novel about the subject, The Poe Shadow.


Closeup of Boston's Edgar Allan Poe statue. (Source.)


Six years ago, on the occasion of Poe's 200th birthday, I took over the StarShipSofa Audio Science Fiction Magazine to host an hour-long tribute to this pioneer of the short story, luminary of Gothic horror, father of detective fiction, and giant of science fiction. You can listen to the podcast here at the StarShipSofa website, or download it here, or access it via iTunes. If you listen, I hope you enjoy my celebration of Poe's life, works, and legacy!

The following are some of my favorite links about Edgar Allan Poe:
* PoeStories.com: An Exploration of Short Stories by Edgar Allan Poe
* The Poe Museum of Richmond
* The Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore

Free for adoption, here is my narration of Poe's "Mellonta Tauta." If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

And speaking of readings, here is one of my favorites: Gabriel Byrne reading Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death."



There were arabesque figures with unsuited limbs and appointments. There were delirious fancies such as the madman fashions. There was much of the beautiful, much of the wanton, much of the bizarre, something of the terrible, and not a little of that which might have excited disgust. To and fro in the seven chambers there stalked, in fact, a multitude of dreams.
- Edgar Allan Poe, "The Masque of the Red Death" (1842)
eldritchhobbit: (Edgar Allan Poe/Raven)
Because Poe featured in yesterday's post, it seemed fitting to mention Poe-related fiction today. I made an interactive Goodreads list of Fiction Featuring Edgar Allan Poe as a Character, and I invite you to check it out and vote on the titles or add new ones, if you'd like to do so.

I thought it appropriate to pull my spooky quotes for the day from two novels I recently read that feature Poe as a character.

"Then I heard a great clatter a few inches above my head and sensed a sudden enclosing, a dimunition of the light. All at once, a terrible racket broke out about me. My ears filled with the sound of hammering, so close that the nails might have been driven into me. There must have been two or three of them wielding hammers, and in that confined space, which acted like a drum, it seemed like a multitude. They were nailing me up in a box no larger than a coffin.... I was to be buried alive. I had no doubt of it whatsoever."
- from The American Boy by Andrew Taylor (Read my review here.)



"All this, known only in hindsight, helps to explain how, in the face of Mary Rogers's drifting corpse, he had remained so calm. And why the subjects most treated in his writings, the investigations he never finished probing, were of death and loss and madness. At thirty-one years of age he had already deduced from too much firsthand evidence that death was arbitrary and capricious and ubiquitous, that all sources of pleasure were as dandelion fluff in the sweep of an unseen hand, and that every human mind was capable of disintegrating into lunacy, that most in fact were already halfway there."
- from On Night's Shore by Randall Silvis (Read my review here.)
eldritchhobbit: (Edgar Allan Poe/Writing)
Happy October! Let the countdown commence! Thank you for joining me for the tenth year of my blog-a-thon celebration of Halloween.

Let's begin on a classic note. Why not start with the very best?

This photo ("takeoff") is by the amazing [livejournal.com profile] lizziebelle.

takeoff

"The Lake -- To --" by Edgar Allan Poe
(This version is from The Raven and Other Poems, 1845.)

In spring of youth it was my lot
To haunt of the wide world a spot
The which I could not love the less --
So lovely was the loneliness
Of a wide lake, with black rock bound,
And the tall pines that towered around.

But when the Night had thrown her pall
Upon that spot, as upon all,
And the mystic wind went by
Murmuring in melody --
Then --
ah then I would awake
To the terror of the lone lake.

Yet that terror was not fright,
But a tremulous delight --

A feeling not the jewelled mine
Could teach or bribe me to define --

Nor Love -- although the Love were thine.

Death was in that poisonous wave,
And in its gulf a fitting grave
For him who thence could solace bring
To his lone imagining
Whose solitary soul could make
An Eden of that dim lake.
eldritchhobbit: (Fringe/Walter/Strawberry death)
Just a quick note to say that my essay "In Search of Fringe's Literary Ancestors" from the book Fringe Science is the spotlight essay today at the Smart Pop Books website. You can read it for free here!
eldritchhobbit: (Edgar Allan Poe/Writing)
Happy birthday to Edgar Allan Poe (19 January, 1809 – 7 October, 1849)!

"Poe Returning to Boston" - L3007227


"Alone"
by Edgar Allan Poe

From childhood's hour I have not been
As others were--I have not seen
As others saw--I could not bring
My passions from a common spring.
From the same source I have not taken
My sorrow; I could not awaken
My heart to joy at the same tone;
And all I lov'd, I loved alone.
Then--in my childhood--in the dawn
Of a most stormy life--was drawn
From ev'ry depth of good and ill
The mystery which binds me still:
From the torrent, or the fountain,
From the red cliff of the mountain,
From the sun that 'round me roll'd
In its autumn tint of gold--
From the lightning in the sky
As it pass'd me flying by--
From the thunder and the storm,
And the cloud that took the form
(When the rest of Heaven was blue)
Of a demon in my view.
eldritchhobbit: (Edgar Allan Poe/Raven)
On this day in 1849, Edgar Allan Poe died at the age of forty under mysterious circumstances.

For more information, read "Mysterious for Evermore" by Matthew Pearl, an article on Poe's death from The Telegraph. Pearl is the author of a fascinating novel about the subject, The Poe Shadow.

Edgar Allan Poe's final grave


Five years ago, on the occasion of Poe's 200th birthday, I took over the StarShipSofa Audio Science Fiction Magazine to host an hour-long tribute to this pioneer of the short story, luminary of Gothic horror, father of detective fiction, and giant of science fiction. You can listen to the podcast here at the StarShipSofa website, or download it here, or access it via iTunes. If you listen, I hope you enjoy my celebration of Poe's life, works, and legacy!

The following are some of my favorite links about Edgar Allan Poe:
* PoeStories.com: An Exploration of Short Stories by Edgar Allan Poe
* The Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore
* The Poe Museum of Richmond (See my pictures of the museum here.)

Free for adoption, here is my narration of Poe's "Mellonta Tauta." If you listen, I hope you enjoy!

And speaking of readings, here is one of my favorites: Gabriel Byrne reading Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death."



There were arabesque figures with unsuited limbs and appointments. There were delirious fancies such as the madman fashions. There was much of the beautiful, much of the wanton, much of the bizarre, something of the terrible, and not a little of that which might have excited disgust. To and fro in the seven chambers there stalked, in fact, a multitude of dreams.
- Edgar Allan Poe, "The Masque of the Red Death" (1842)
eldritchhobbit: (Edgar Allan Poe/Writing)
Happy birthday to Edgar Allan Poe (19 January, 1809 – 7 October, 1849)!

Poe


"Alone"
by Edgar Allan Poe

From childhood's hour I have not been
As others were--I have not seen
As others saw--I could not bring
My passions from a common spring.
From the same source I have not taken
My sorrow; I could not awaken
My heart to joy at the same tone;
And all I lov'd, I loved alone.
Then--in my childhood--in the dawn
Of a most stormy life--was drawn
From ev'ry depth of good and ill
The mystery which binds me still:
From the torrent, or the fountain,
From the red cliff of the mountain,
From the sun that 'round me roll'd
In its autumn tint of gold--
From the lightning in the sky
As it pass'd me flying by--
From the thunder and the storm,
And the cloud that took the form
(When the rest of Heaven was blue)
Of a demon in my view.
eldritchhobbit: (Default)
My Spring 2014 online, interactive, international course for The Mythgard Institute (available both for M.A. students who are seeking degrees and auditors wishing to participate the love of the subject) is now open for registration. It's "The Gothic Tradition."

The Gothic Tradition at Mythgard Institute

Here is the class description: The Gothic literary tradition began in the mid-eighteenth century in Europe and lives on in various forms across the globe through contemporary fiction, poetry, art, music, film, and television. Mad scientists, blasted heaths, abandoned ruins, elusive ghosts, charming vampires, and even little green men people its stories. With ingredients such as a highly developed sense of atmosphere, extreme emotions including fear and awe, and emphases on the mysterious and the paranormal, Gothic works tend to express anxieties about social, political, religious, and economic issues of the time, as well as rejection of prevailing modes of thought and behavior. This course will investigate the fascinating and subversive Gothic imagination (from the haunted castles of Horace Walpole to the threatening aliens of H.P. Lovecraft, from Dracula to Coraline), identify the historical conditions that have inspired it, consider how it has developed across time and place and medium, and explore how it has left its indelible imprint on the modern genres of science fiction and fantasy.

Here is the class trailer.



For more information, check out the course page here.
eldritchhobbit: (Re-Animator/Read More)
As a follow-up to my earlier countdown post today, I wanted to tell/remind you of two very worthy Halloween-related Kickstarters in progress that are closing at the end of the month. I invite you to join me in supporting these and/or helping pass along the word. Many thanks!

* First, I have been a fan of Jeffrey Combs for many years, and his portrayals of Edgar Allan Poe (in television's Black Cat and his one-man show Nevermore) are simply outstanding. I had a chance to talk with him about Poe last year at ConCarolinas, and I thoroughly enjoyed and appreciated his insights into the author. He takes Poe very seriously, and I take this Kickstarter very seriously. Let's make a feature film of Nevermore happen!

Master Horror director Stuart Gordon, brilliant actor Jeffrey Combs, and inspired screenwriter Dennis Paoli -- the team that brought you From Beyond and Re-Animator - team up again to bring you a brand new feature film: NEVERMORE. Visit the Kickstarter campaign.




* Second, every year, Popcorn Press celebrates Halloween by publishing a collection of horror poetry and short fiction. Previous years have included Vampyr Verse (2009), The Hungry Dead (2010), Halloween Haiku (2011), and Cthulhu Haiku (2012). This year the topic is Cthulhu Haiku II and More Mythos Madness, a collection of works inspired by H.P. Lovecraft. If the project gets 100 backers (with as little as $2 contributed per backer), an audiobook version of Cthulhu Haiku II will be recorded. Awesome, no? Visit the Kickstarter campaign.




from Cthulhu Haiku...

pouty-lipped & gilled
their tongues like fishermen’s hooks—
kissing Innsmouth girls

— Robert Borski

Necronomicon
on my Kindle, downloading
hell in a handheld

— Bob Wake

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