eldritchhobbit: (Re-Animator/Weird)
Hey everyone! Remember me? Apologies for being quiet. I am slammed with work at the moment. I look forward to catching up with emails and comments soon. In the meantime, I wanted to make a quick post with some updates.


First, in one week until HP Comics will start its first Kickstarter! I hope you'll check it out. I'll post more when the event is live.



Speaking of HP Comics, huge congratulations to our President and Publisher Dwight L. MacPherson! His comic Howard Lovecraft and the Undersea Kingdom is being adapted to film, and Mark Hamill, Jeffrey Combs, and Christopher Plummer will be voicing roles! Too cool!

In other news, my Apex Magazine essay "The Once and Future Chief: Tecumseh in (Science) Fiction" is now online here. If you read it, I hope you enjoy it.

Wishing you a wonderful day, my friends!
eldritchhobbit: (Tecumseh)
My "The Once and Future Chief: Tecumseh in (Science) Fiction" appears in this month's Apex Magazine. I'm so delighted to be featured in such fantastic company! This special double issue is available in ebook form for $2.99.

Happy 2017!

Jan. 1st, 2017 08:29 am
eldritchhobbit: (Tecumseh)
Happy 2017, my friends! At the dawn of each year I revisit this quote. I think it is worth repeating...

Sunrise at Redmires, Sheffield

So live your life that the fear of death can never enter your heart.

Trouble no one about their religion;
respect others in their view,
and demand that they respect yours.

Love your life, perfect your life, beautify all things in your life.

Seek to make your life long
and its purpose in the service of your people.

Prepare a noble death song
for the day when you go over the great divide.

Always give a word or a sign of salute when meeting or passing
a friend, even a stranger, when in a lonely place.

Show respect to all people and grovel to none.

When you arise in the morning give thanks for the food
and for the joy of living;
if you see no reason for giving thanks,
the fault lies only in yourself.

Abuse no one and no thing,
for abuse turns the wise ones to fools
and robs the spirit of its vision.

When it comes your time to die,
be not like those whose hearts are filled with the fear
of death, so that when their time comes they weep and pray
for a little more time to live their lives over again in a different
way; sing your death song and die like a hero going home.


- attributed to Tecumseh* (1768?-1813), Shawnee Nation


* (Note: The historian in me demanded that I add this footnote, just FYI. While researching and writing this I failed to find an adequate source for the above quote, so I suspect it has been enhanced and adjusted over the years, and might not even have originated with him at all. The sentiments, however, fit extremely well with more verifiable statements and speeches made by Tecumseh.)

Happy 2014!

Jan. 1st, 2014 09:05 am
eldritchhobbit: (Tecumseh)
Each year I revisit this quote. I think it is worth repeating...


So live your life that the fear of death can never enter your heart.

Trouble no one about their religion;
respect others in their view,
and demand that they respect yours.

Love your life, perfect your life, beautify all things in your life.

Seek to make your life long
and its purpose in the service of your people.

Prepare a noble death song
for the day when you go over the great divide.

Always give a word or a sign of salute when meeting or passing
a friend, even a stranger, when in a lonely place.

Show respect to all people and grovel to none.

When you arise in the morning give thanks for the food
and for the joy of living;
if you see no reason for giving thanks,
the fault lies only in yourself.

Abuse no one and no thing,
for abuse turns the wise ones to fools
and robs the spirit of its vision.

When it comes your time to die,
be not like those whose hearts are filled with the fear
of death, so that when their time comes they weep and pray
for a little more time to live their lives over again in a different
way; sing your death song and die like a hero going home.


- attributed to Tecumseh (1768?-1813), Shawnee Nation*


Happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] nickdcam, and happy early birthday to [livejournal.com profile] the_cornettist, [livejournal.com profile] milkybarbiatch, [livejournal.com profile] delwyncole, [livejournal.com profile] jpsorrow, [livejournal.com profile] gryphonrhi, [livejournal.com profile] impishtubist, [livejournal.com profile] called_daughter, [livejournal.com profile] brighteyed_jill, [livejournal.com profile] scribblerworks, [livejournal.com profile] mjolnir1964, [livejournal.com profile] altariel, [livejournal.com profile] lukeski, [livejournal.com profile] seemag, [livejournal.com profile] heidi8, [livejournal.com profile] thrihyrne, [livejournal.com profile] astromachy, [livejournal.com profile] manonlechat, [livejournal.com profile] shalna, [livejournal.com profile] estellye, [livejournal.com profile] green_key, [livejournal.com profile] reynardine, [livejournal.com profile] brandaluna,[livejournal.com profile] arisbe, [livejournal.com profile] dirtwitch, and [livejournal.com profile] dominique012. May all of you enjoy many happy returns of the day!


(* Note: The historian in me demanded that I add this footnote, just FYI. While researching and writing this I failed to find an adequate source for the above quote, so I suspect it has been enhanced and adjusted over the years. The sentiments, however, fit extremely well with more verifiable statements and speeches made by Tecumseh.)
eldritchhobbit: (Tecumseh)
As part of Lenoir-Rhyne University's celebration of Native American History Month, and in recognition of the 200th anniversary of his death this year, I'll be giving a talk tomorrow morning (free and open to the public) on "Remembering Tecumseh: A Great Native American Leader." Everyone's welcome!

Tecumseh: A Biography


In other news...

* The stage musical adaptation of The Lord of the Rings is going on a world tour! I saw it when it debuted at Toronto's Prince of Wales Theatre. If you can make it to a performance, I recommend it.

* John Finnemore has posted about the forthcoming and final Cabin Pressure special.

* Reminder: if you'd like a holiday card from me this year, please respond here.


"Our lives are in the hands of the Great Spirit. We are determined to defend our lands, and if it is his will, we wish to leave our bones upon them. - Tecumseh
eldritchhobbit: (Headstone)
On this day in spooky history, the seeds of a curse -- or at least its legend -- were planted.

The story begins with tragedy. On this day in 1813, exactly two centuries ago, the great pan-tribal leader Tecumseh fell at the Battle of the Thames. His ally, a British major-general, abandoned him to their foes and was later court-martialed for the disgrace.*

The leader of the U.S. forces who slew Tecumseh was William Henry Harrison, a future president of the United States. Harrison died of pneumonia only a month after taking office. Zachary Taylor, who also fought against Tecumseh in the War of 1812, was likewise elected to the presidency -- and he also died in office.

The legend grew and evolved, ultimately suggesting that on the day Tecumseh perished, his brother Tenskwatawa (a religious leader known as The Prophet) had cursed both William Henry Harrison and future White House occupants who were elected during years with the same ending number as Harrison's election.

Death of Tecumseh


For the next 120 years, presidents elected during years ending in a zero (which happens every 20 years) died while serving in office.

Election of 1840: William Henry Harrison - died in office of pneumonia
Election of 1860: Abraham Lincoln - assassinated in office
Election of 1880: James Garfield - assassinated in office
Election of 1900: William McKinley - assassinated in office
Election of 1920: Warren G. Harding - died in office of heart attack or stroke
Election of 1940: Franklin Roosevelt - died in office of cerebral hemorrhage
Election of 1960: John F. Kennedy - assassinated in office

Death of William Henry Harrison


The election of 1980 "challenged" the curse; Ronald Reagan was seriously wounded by an assassination attempt while in office, but he survived.

The election of 2000 "broke" the curse; George W. Bush remained uninjured after an attempted assassination, when he was targeted while in office with a dud live grenade.

It's an eerie bit of history, isn't it?

Read more about the legend of Tecumseh's curse here.


* I find Tecumseh to be an important and fascinating figure, so much so that I wrote a biography of him for students.
On a related note, I'll be giving a talk about Tecumseh and his legacy (free and open to the public) at 10am on November 15 as part of the Native American History Month celebrations at Lenoir-Rhyne University.
eldritchhobbit: (Tecumseh)
Happy 2010! Best wishes to one and all.

Each year I revisit this quote. I think it is worth repeating...


So live your life that the fear of death can never enter your heart.

Trouble no one about their religion;
respect others in their view,
and demand that they respect yours.

Love your life, perfect your life, beautify all things in your life.

Seek to make your life long
and its purpose in the service of your people.

Prepare a noble death song
for the day when you go over the great divide.

Always give a word or a sign of salute when meeting or passing
a friend, even a stranger, when in a lonely place.

Show respect to all people and grovel to none.

When you arise in the morning give thanks for the food
and for the joy of living;
if you see no reason for giving thanks,
the fault lies only in yourself.

Abuse no one and no thing,
for abuse turns the wise ones to fools
and robs the spirit of its vision.

When it comes your time to die,
be not like those whose hearts are filled with the fear
of death, so that when their time comes they weep and pray
for a little more time to live their lives over again in a different
way; sing your death song and die like a hero going home.


- attributed to Tecumseh (1768?-1813), Shawnee Nation

(Note: The historian in me demanded that I add this footnote, just FYI. While researching and writing this I failed to find an adequate source for the above quote, so I suspect it has been enhanced and adjusted over the years, and might not even have originated with him at all. The sentiments, however, fit quite well with more verifiable statements and speeches made by Tecumseh.)
eldritchhobbit: (Tecumseh)
Happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] savagedoc45, and best wishes for many happy returns of the day!

* I have been following the production of the PBS five-part series We Shall Remain with great interest, not only because it pledges to be "a provocative multi-media project that establishes Native history as an essential part of American history," but also because two of the episodes focus on subjects about which I have written books (my Tecumseh: A Biography and The Trail of Tears and Indian Removal), and all touch on issues about which I've lectured and taught in university courses. (It's hard to believe it's been almost a full year since I was at Wounded Knee!) The Trail of Tears segment, in particular, is especially noteworthy, as it is the first drama to look at removal from the often overlooked perspective of the Treaty (Ridge/Boudinot) Party of the Cherokee Nation, and that is a very big deal. With Native filmmakers such as Chris Eyre and actors such as Wes Studi involved, the project has tremendous promise, and my hopes are extremely high.

The first installment debuts on PBS on April 13; you can read more about the series here.

Here is the lineup of episodes:
1. After the Mayflower - In 1621, Massasoit, sachem of the Wampanoags of New England negotiated a treaty with Pilgrim settlers. A half-century later, as a brutal war flared between the English and a confederation of Indians, this diplomatic gamble seemed to have been a grave miscalculation. Directed by Chris Eyre.
2. Tecumseh's Vision - In the course of his brief and meteoric career, Tecumseh would become one of the greatest Native American leaders of all time, orchestrating the most ambitious pan-Indian resistance movement ever mounted on the North American continent. After his death he would live on as a potent symbol of Native pride and pan Indian identity. Directed by Ric Burns and Chris Eyre.
3. Trail of Tears - Though the Cherokee embraced "civilization" and won recognition of tribal sovereignty in the U.S. Supreme Court, their resistance to removal from their homeland failed. Thousands were forced on a perilous march to Oklahoma. Directed by Chris Eyre.
4. Geronimo - As the leader of the last Native American fighting force to capitulate to the U.S. government, Geronimo was seen by some as the perpetrator of unspeakable savage cruelties, while to others he was the embodiment of proud resistance. Directed by Dustinn Craig and Sarah Colt.
5. Wounded Knee - In 1973, American Indian Movement activists and residents of the Pine Ridge Reservation occupied the town of Wounded Knee, demanding redress for grievances. As a result of the siege, Indians across the country forged a new path into the future. Directed by Stanley Nelson.


* While I'm talking about Native artists, let me suggest a great book for those of you who are enjoying the current young adult vampire novel phenomenon: The Night Wanderer: A Native Gothic Novel by Drew Hayden Taylor. I highly recommend it!


"Will the Congress of the United States permit its citizens to invade us in a warlike manner in time of peace?"
- Elias Boudinot, Editor, The Cherokee Phoenix, January 8, 1831
eldritchhobbit: (Dancer)
My biography of Tecumseh debuts in bookstores today.

Photobucket
eldritchhobbit: (Default)
Happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] sarah531 and happy early birthday to [livejournal.com profile] captnofmyheart! May you both have wonderful days and fantastic years to come.

And to all of my friends, happy April Fools' Day! If you're looking for the perfect listening for today, I recommend going here to learn more about Despoilers of the Golden Empire by Randall Garrett, which was originally published in Astounding Science Fiction for April Fools’ Day in 1959, and is available today as a free audio download from the wonderful Maria Lectrix.


* In other news, I just learned that legendary Native filmmaker Chris Eyre, the man behind Smoke Signals, Skins, and Edge of America, among other movies, is currently working on a biographical project called We Shall Remain: Tecumseh, which will air in 2009 as part of the We Shall Remain: A Native History of America project. Needless to say, I'm anxious to learn more about the miniseries. I do know that Cree actor Michael Greyeyes will be portraying Tecumseh.

* And speaking of Tecumseh, Greenwood Press has moved the official publication date for my new book Tecumseh: A Biography from May 2008 to April 2008. So it's only a matter of days now!


A quote of the day:

"I wish it was in my power to do justice to the eloquence of this distinguished man: but it is utterly impossible. The richest colours, shaded with a master’s pencil, would fall infinitely short of the glowing finish of the original. The occasion and subject were particularly adapted to call into action all the powers of genuine patriotism; and such language, such gestures, and such feelings and fullness of soul contending for utterance, were exhibited [by Tecumseh...] as no audience, I am persuaded, either in ancient or modern times ever before witnessed."
- John D. Hunter's eyewitness account of Tecumseh's address to the Osages in 1811
eldritchhobbit: (Castle/Hornblower/Seize the Fire)
I have some personal news to share...

* New today: I just gave an interview to Talking With Tim, in which I discuss several of my recent book projects, including The Magic Goblet, Past Watchful Dragons: Fantasy and Faith in the World of C.S. Lewis, and Tecumseh: A Biography, as well as my upcoming appearances and other subjects. You can read it here.


* I will be taking part in the Voices Film Series for the Hickory, NC community, a project that is co-sponsored by Lenoir-Rhyne College and the Women's Resource Center in Hickory. This program, which is free and open to the public, will take place on the evenings of February 27 and 28, 2008, and will focus on Native America. We will be showing two Native-produced films over two nights: first the award-winning 2006 film Four Sheets to the Wind, and next the award-winning 2006 documentary Trail of Tears: Cherokee Legacy paired with comments and a book signing (of The Trail of Tears and Indian Removal) by yours truly. I hope those who are interested will visit here to learn more. We would love to have you join us for these two evenings!


In other news...

* Kristin Thompson, author of The Frodo Franchise: The Lord of the Rings and Modern Hollywood, now has a blog on the subject here. (It's syndicated for LJ at [livejournal.com profile] frodo_franchise.)

* The London cast recording of The Lord of the Rings: The Musical soundtrack is now available for preorder. So, too, is the Official Stage Companion. Read more here.

* The Wizard Rock EP of the Month Club is coming back for 2008 in order to raise funds for charity. Members will receive an exclusive CD from a different Harry Potter-themed wizard rock band each month. Learn more here.


"Science fiction is the mythology of a scientific age."
John C. Wright, quoted in this interview
eldritchhobbit: (Sparkly)
I'm trying to get my ducks in a row for 2008. Here's the latest from my world...

1. My forthcoming book, Tecumseh: A Biography, is now available for pre-order directly from Greenwood Press and from Amazon.com.

2. Pop Thought has just conducted a new interview with me (published Jan. 3, 2008) about the book. You can read it here.

3. Also today, a new review of my Past Watchful Dragons: Fantasy and Faith in the World of C.S. Lewis book went up at Sword of Gryffindor here.

4. I will be interviewed on Woodland Star New Radio (which is accessible via computer here) on Sunday, January 6, 2008 at 6:55pm EST for approximately 40 minutes about my scholarly work regarding J.R.R. Tolkien. The show is entitled "An Afternoon of Wandering with Frodo and Dr. Amy H. Sturgis through Mirkwood Forest." Listeners can email questions before the interview (woodlandstar@hotmail.com) or call in live to ask questions during the interview.

Read the 'Next Guest' information posted about my interview. )

Thanks for letting me share this news with you, my friends! May you have a wonderful day.


In honor of J.R.R. Tolkien's birthday today, here is Tolkienian goodness from The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, the song of Beren and Lúthien:

The leaves were long, the grass was green,
The hemlock-umbels tall and fair,
And in the glade a light was seen
Of stars in shadow shimmering.
Tinúviel was dancing there
To music of a pipe unseen,
And light of stars was in her hair,
And in her raiment glimmering.

There Beren came from mountains cold, )

Happy 2008!

Jan. 1st, 2008 09:34 am
eldritchhobbit: (Default)
I wish all of you a happy 2008!

In thinking about the promise and challenge of facing a new year, and all of the resolutions that seem to come with the change of the calendar, I keep returning to a favorite quote. So here it is. I have quoted it before in the past, but I think it's worth repeating. It represents my hopes for the new year, and my very best wishes for my friends, family, and world.


So live your life that the fear of death can never enter your heart.

Trouble no one about their religion;
respect others in their view, and demand that they respect yours.

Love your life, perfect your life, beautify all things in your life.

Seek to make your life long and its purpose in the service of your people.

Prepare a noble death song for the day when you go over the great divide.

Always give a word or a sign of salute when meeting or passing a friend,
even a stranger, when in a lonely place.

Show respect to all people and grovel to none.

When you arise in the morning give thanks for the food
and for the joy of living;
if you see no reason for giving thanks, the fault lies only in yourself.

Abuse no one and no thing,
for abuse turns the wise ones to fools and robs the spirit of its vision.

When it comes your time to die,
be not like those whose hearts are filled with the fear of death,
so that when their time comes they weep and pray for a little more time
to live their lives over again in a different way;
sing your death song and die like a hero going home.


- attributed to Tecumseh (1768?-1813), Shawnee Nation
eldritchhobbit: (fairytales)
First, a couple of personal notes:

* I have thoroughly updated my website, including my recommended links page.

* The information for Tecumseh: A Biography is now up on the Greenwood Press site and Amazon.com.


Now, on to music news:

I am a sincere fan of Giuseppe Festa and his band Lingalad. You can read my review of the first album here at Revolution Science Fiction and my interview with Giuseppe here at Pop Thought. I've had the very good fortune of hearing Giuseppe perform his nature- and Middle-Earth-inspired music live on several occasions at various Tolkien-related international events, and each time has been wonderful.

Now a new book from Bastogi - La Musica dei Lingalad: Da Tolkien ai Segreti della Natura, or The Music of Lingalad: From Tolkien to the Secrets of Nature - is available, and it comes with a Best of Lingalad CD, which includes 19 classic songs and 3 new ones. I contributed a section to the book, as did others, including Lord of the Rings artist John Howe and actors Craig Parker and Bruce Hopkins. There is more information about the book and CD here. International buyers should email info@lingalad.it for pricing and shipping details. Additional information about other albums appears on Lingalad's main website.

I'll leave you with some Lingalad:



Here's one more video by Lingalad.


While snow the window-panes bedim,
The fire curls up a sunny charm,
Where, creaming o'er the pitcher's rim,
The flowering ale is set to warm;
Mirth, full of joy as summer bees,
Sits there, its pleasures to impart,
And children, 'tween their parent's knees,
Sing scraps of carols o'er by heart.
- John Clare, December
eldritchhobbit: (LOTR/Cuddle Hobbit)
Hello, my friends! It's a very hectic time of the semester, so please excuse the fact I'm a bit quiet at the moment.


I do have some news to share:

* My forthcoming biography of Tecumseh, which will be available from Greenwood Press in Spring 2008, now has cover art!

* I will be interviewed on Woodland Star Net Radio (which is accessible via computer) on January 6, 2008 at 6:55pm EST. I will be interviewed for approximately 40 minutes about my work, especially (but not exclusively) regarding J.R.R. Tolkien.


But wait, there's more!

* MTV has released has released its list of the Top Ten Wizard Rock Bands of 2007. I suppose it is rather scary that I have music by eight of these bands on my iPod.

* The results of the Tenth Annual Mutant Awards are now online. Feel the love!


There will always be a certain small percentage of persons who feel a burning curiosity about unknown outer space, and a burning desire to escape from the prison-house of the known and the real into those enchanted lands of incredible adventure and infinite possibilities which dreams open up to us, and which things like deep woods, fantastic urban towers, and flaming sunsets suggest.
"Notes on Writing Weird Fiction," H.P. Lovecraft

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Tags

Page generated Oct. 17th, 2017 01:16 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios