eldritchhobbit: (Halloween)
Where did the weeks go? Time is flying by, and October will be here before we know it! I have an action-packed semester before me, so I'd like to plan ahead and ask your opinion, if I may.

FYI, for those of you who don't know, for the last nine years I've had a tradition of turning this blog -- the posts of which also run on Goodreads, Amazon, and Twitter -- into a month-long celebration of Halloween, posting a "spooky post" every day in October. You can see my past October posts here.

(Important Note: If you can't vote via the ticky-boxes, you're more than welcome to leave a comment!)

Many thanks for your input.

[Poll #2019737]
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween)
Ack, where did the time go? The weeks are flying by, and October will be here before we know it! I'd like to ask your opinion, if I may.

FYI, for those of you who don't know, for the last eight years I've had a tradition of turning this blog into a month-long celebration of Halloween, posting a "spooky post" every day in October. You can see my past October posts here.

(Note: If you're not on LiveJournal and can't vote via the ticky-boxes, you're welcome to leave a comment!)

Thanks for your input!

[Poll #1980032]

Poll time!

Aug. 7th, 2013 12:58 pm
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween/vintage)
At the rate at which the weeks are flying past, October will be here before we know it. Since I'm the anal, pre-planning sort, and I have an action-packed fall season before me, I thought I'd look ahead and post this poll.

FYI, for those of you who don't know, for the last seven years I've had a tradition of turning this blog into a month-long celebration of Halloween, posting a "spooky post" every day in October. You can see my past October posts here.

(Note: If you're not on LiveJournal and can't vote via the ticky-boxes, you're welcome to leave a comment!)

[Poll #1928089]

Thanks for your feedback, my friends!

PS. On a Lovecraft-loving note, check out this Kickstarter for a dieselpunk Savage Worlds setting called Frozen Skies. Of particular interest is the setting, which features Lovecraftian elements (specifically reminiscent of At the Mountains of Madness). Unfortunately, pledges have been a touch anemic. [livejournal.com profile] sittingduck1313 is spreading the word in hopes that some eleventh-hour pledges will help the campaign reach its goal.
eldritchhobbit: (Dracula/Gorey)
On this day 100 years ago, Peter Cushing was born. He would go on to become an actor and a gentleman, portraying roles from Jane Austen's Mr. Darcy to Edgar Rice Burroughs's Dr. Abney Perry, a repeated Victor Frankenstein and Van Helsing, and a staple of Hammer Horror films. He became a very human Doctor Who, and he offered, over a number of years, one of cinema's finest interpretations of Sherlock Holmes (one of my "top three" favorite incarnations of the Great Detective). Last but certainly not least, Cushing became Grand Moff Tarkin himself, wielder of the Death Star, destroyer of Alderaan, and holder of Darth Vader's leash.

peter cushing tarkin photo: Grand Moff Tarkin tarkin.jpg


[Poll #1915650]

Peter Cushing in ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' (1959)
eldritchhobbit: (Maya)
Happy Winter Solstice! And happy beginning of the Fourth Age, according to the Long Count Calendar of the Maya!

(In case you're looking for some "holiday" listening, my analysis of the pop culture phenomenon surrounding 2012 - from history to science to fantasy - is available in two of my "Looking Back on Genre History" segments for StarShipSofa: "2012, Part 1" and "2012, Part 2.")


What 2013 films are you looking forward to the most?
[Poll #1886199]


Here's my list of the 2013 films I'm most anticipating and their opening dates:

Mama (January 18)
Beautiful Creatures (February 13)
The Last Exorcism, Part II (March 1)
The Host (March 29)
Oblivion (April 19)
** Star Trek into Darkness (May 17)
Much Ado About Nothing (June 7)
The Conjuring (July 19)
Red 2 (August 2)
The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones (August 23)
** The World's End (October 25)
** Ender's Game (November 1)
** The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (November 22)
** The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (December 13)
** How I Live Now (2013 Date TBA)

** I plan to see this in the theater.
[Note: These days I much prefer watching films in our home media room, with a glass of wine or a cup of tea and my sweetheart and Boston terrier at my side, rather than in the theater, where I can only hope (in vain?) that the other audience members won't talk/text/arrive late. Don't I sound like an old curmudgeon? LOL. But now and again I make an exception, when I simply can't wait for the DVD. 2013 looks to be an especially promising year.]
eldritchhobbit: (Hobbit/Bilbo walking)
I've seen The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey twice now, and I'm planning to work up a proper review shortly. Nutshell version: it's definitely a flawed film (mostly related to the writing and special effects), but the positives far outweigh the negatives, and I enjoyed it more than any of Jackson's adaptations since The Fellowship of the Ring. The acting, in particular, is fantastic. Martin Freeman is J.R.R. Tolkien's, Ian Holm's, and his own Bilbo Baggins, all at the same time, brilliantly. Richard Armitage's Thorin Oakenshield and Ken Stott's Balin are both exactly how I always imagined them, only better.

A few notes:

* The Call for Papers is now available here for "The Future of Harry Potter: The 2013 PotterWatch Conference" at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (April 6, 2013). I was the Keynote Speaker for the 2012 PotterWatch Conference, and I had a fantastic time at the event. If you're interested, I highly recommend taking part. (Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] gods_lil_rocker.)

* Great news for fantasy lovers: G.L. Gregg's wonderful novel The Sporran is now available for Kindle.

* My narration of Jeff Carlson's novel The Frozen Sky is now available not only on Audible (where it's currently $12.97 for members as part of the site-wide sale), but also on Amazon and on iTunes.


POLL TIME! What new Spring 2013 TV programs (if any) are you going to watch?

[Poll #1885008]

We're planning to give The Following and Ripper Street a try in January.

For Fall 2012, we "test drove" several disappointing "clunkers" (Elementary, Revolution, 666 Park Avenue, and Copper), but we've ended up enjoying Last Resort thus far - which, of course, means it was cancelled.

(After living in Nashville for seventeen years and knowing so many people in the industry and locations where it's filmed - including my alma mater - we also have to watch Nashville. It's particularly fun to see the talented Kimberly Williams-Paisley in an interesting role. Her husband, Brad Paisley, not only graduated from and supports Belmont University, but he's also said publicly lovely things about the experience and impact of having my husband as his professor, so it's no surprise that I have a huge soft spot for him!)
eldritchhobbit: (Nosferatu)
In contrast to my recent list of "off the beaten path" spooky movies, I've been thinking about my favorite vintage (that is, black-and-white) horror films.

It was very difficult, but I limited myself to a Halloween-friendly thirteen. I'm not claiming these are the very best in the genre (although some of them most certainly are), but these are my favorites.

Favorite "Vintage" (Black-and-White) Horror Films


13. I Walked with a Zombie (1943) Take Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre and add Haitian voodoo practices. It's an unexpectedly winning combination.

12. Village of the Damned (1960) Quite a faithful adaption of The Midwich Cuckoos by John Wyndham. I also recommend the effective and haunting sequel, Children of the Damned (1963).

11. Carnival of Souls (1962) This indie film was produced for an estimated $33,000 and released as a B film, but today it's a cult classic for good reason. This is what I think of now whenever I hear organ music.

10. Them! (1954) The very best of the "giant mutant bugs" subgenre, this one creeped out my mother when she was a little girl. I was genetically predisposed to find it to be horrifying fun.

9. Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte (1964) Seven Academy Award nominations. Brilliant performances all around, but the great Olivia de Havilland is the one who makes this film for me.

8. Dracula (1931) Bela Lugosi. Enough said.

7. Nosferatu (1922) Elegant and inexorable, Max Schreck as Count Orlok never goes out of style.

6. The Cat People (1942) I've grown to love Val Lewton's understated gothic films, and this one is the most compelling: darkly psychological, beautifully shot, with perfect casting in Simone Simon.

5. The Last Man on Earth (1964) The best film adaptation of Richard Matheson's unforgettable I Am Legend, this is my favorite Vincent Price performance - and that's saying a lot.

4. Night of the Living Dead (1968) "They're coming for you, Barbara." Path-breaking horror with a chilling message.

3. Psycho (1960) Alfred Hitchcock's finest, without a doubt. Anthony Perkins is mesmerizing.

Frankenstein Poster 2


2. Frankenstein (1931) James Whale does something very, very different from Mary Shelley here, but I forgive him for it, because this, too, is brilliant. Boris Karloff's empathy with and sympathy for the creature raises his performance to genius.

"Invasion of the Body Snatchers" poster


1. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) One of my "top five" movies of all time, this is note-perfect. As much as I appreciate some of the later adaptations of Jack Finney's novel, this one stands head-and-shoulders above the rest, capturing paranoia, claustrophobia, and a sense of impending doom like no other film.


Now it's your turn!

[Poll #1873922]
Feel free to note your favorites in the comments, as well.

Thanks for playing!
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween/vintage)
Every year about this time I think about good Halloween films (not necessarily horror movies, and definitely not lame slasher pictures, but suspenseful, atmospheric films that put a chill up the spine) that are "off the beaten path" -- that is, films that are independent, foreign, direct to DVD, or somehow under promoted, and thus might easily slip under the proverbial radar. Not the usual suspects.

Today I have quite a few new recommendations to add to the list, based on this year's viewing. Here they are, in chronological order.

  • Another Earth (2011): On the night of the discovery of a duplicate planet in the solar system, an ambitious young student and an accomplished composer cross paths in a tragic accident. This is one of my very favorite films of the year.




  • Exit Humanity (2011): A young man struggles to survive in the aftermath of a deadly undead outbreak during the American Civil War. This is a period zombie film with a heart and a brain. There's zombie-related gore, but it serves the purpose of the story.

  • Cabin in the Woods (2011): Five friends go for a break at a remote cabin in the woods, where they get more than they bargained for. Together, they must discover the truth behind the cabin in the woods. Joss Whedon wrote this, and that's probably enough said right there. This turns all the classic horror tropes upside down.

  • Some Guy Who Kills People (2011): This is a horror-comedy about a small town loser fresh out of an asylum who seeks revenge on those he deems responsible for ruining his life. Unexpectedly poignant and character-driven.

  • Hobo with a Shotgun (2011): In this satirical film, a homeless vigilante played by Rutger Hauer blows away "crooked cops, pedophile Santas, and other scumbags" with his trusty pump-action shotgun. Warnings for gore and adult content. This is a dark and wry tongue-halfway-but-only-halfway-in-cheek dystopia.

  • Absentia (2011): A woman and her sister begin to link a mysterious tunnel to a series of disappearances, including that of her own husband. I haven't had a chance to see this yet, but my husband (who has) assures me that it belongs on this list.

  • The Last Exorcism (2010): A troubled evangelical minister agrees to let his last exorcism be filmed by a documentary crew. I was unexpectedly enthralled with this; it twisted and turned in directions I didn't anticipate, and its ending is straight out of a Lovecraft story. Highly recommended.

  • Tucker and Dale vs. Evil (2010): "Good old boys" Tucker and Dale are on vacation at their dilapidated mountain cabin when they are attacked by a group of preppy college kids. This is ridiculously clever as it plays into and subverts classic horror scenarios. I laughed out loud.

  • YellowBrickRoad (2010): In 1940, the entire population of Friar, New Hampshire walked up a winding mountain trail, leaving everything behind. In 2008, the first official expedition into the wilderness attempts to solve the mystery of the lost citizens of Friar. There's gore here, but far more psychological horror. The premise would've made a fine Twilight Zone episode. My husband felt the ending was a disappointing cop-out, but I give it props for originality.

  • The Lazarus Project (2008): A former criminal gets a second chance at life and mysteriously ends up working at a psychiatric hospital where nothing is at it seems. Terrific psychological piece. I don't know why this didn't receive more attention and praise.


  • And, lastly...

  • Woman in Black (2012): This one isn't "off the beaten path" by any means, but I enjoyed it so much I'm noting it anyway. It's a rare example of a film adaptation that changes the ending of its source text and in fact improves the story.


Here are some of the other recent "off the beaten path" films that I find chilling enough for the season, starting with my "top picks" from last year:

  • the dark fantasy Black Death (2010). Set during the time of the first outbreak of bubonic plague in England, a young monk is tasked with learning the truth about reports of people who are immune to the sickness in a small village, allegedly made so by "witchcraft." What follows is a dark fable that considers evil and love, loyalty and death, faith and fate. Excellent turns by Sean Bean, Eddie Redmayne, and a strong supporting cast really bring this to life (pun intended), and I was more than pleasantly surprised by the atmospheric eeriness and thoughtful tragedy of this film. As Alan Jones from Film4's "FrightFest" said about the film, "This intelligent original represents a commendable break from the genre norm and is one of the most powerful films made about God, the godless and what the Devil truly represents."

  • the Gothic film Dorian Gray (2009), which I believe was never widely released in theaters in the U.S. I thought it was quite well done, true to the spirit if not the letter of Oscar Wilde's story, admirably restrained with the special effects, and graced by compelling performances by Ben Barnes, Colin Firth, and Rachel Hurd-Wood. It's perfect for the Halloween season, to my way of thinking.

  • the brilliant The Burrowers (2008), an independent science fiction/horror Western that was short on cheap gore and long on psychological terror (just the way I like it), and we thoroughly enjoyed every minute of it. Highly recommended.

  • the brilliant, quirky, lovingly satirical films of Larry Blamire (thanks to [livejournal.com profile] marthawells for the recommendation), which are "must see" material, including The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra (2004) and its sequel The Lost Skeleton Returns Again (2009), as well as the standalone films Trail of the Screaming Forehead (2007) and Dark and Stormy Night (2009) - I simply can't praise these enough,

  • the Finnish historical fantasy/horror/morality play Sauna (2008 - thanks to [livejournal.com profile] mr_earbrass for the recommendation),

  • the surreal dark fantasy Franklyn (2008),

  • the chilling, true crime-inspired Borderland (2007),

  • the Spanish science fiction thriller Timecrimes (2007),

  • the moody, Lovecraft-inspired Cthulhu (2007),

  • the gorgeous, silent Lovecraft adaptation The Call of Cthulhu (2005),

  • the U.S. Civil War-era dark fantasy/horror Dead Birds (2004),

  • and the dystopian psychological thriller Final (2001).


Your mileage, of course, may vary.

Your turn!

[Poll #1872373]

Poll Time!

Aug. 12th, 2012 02:31 pm
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween)
Happy early birthday to [livejournal.com profile] lucybun, [livejournal.com profile] baka_kit, [livejournal.com profile] gabrielle_h, [livejournal.com profile] onegoat, [livejournal.com profile] mbranesf, and [livejournal.com profile] roo2. May you all have wonderful days and terrific years to come.

At the rate at which the weeks are flying past, October will be here before we know it. Since I'm the anal, pre-planning sort, and I have an action-packed fall season before me, I thought I'd look ahead and post this poll.

FYI, for those of you who don't know, for the last six years I've had a tradition of turning this blog into a month-long celebration of Halloween, posting a "spooky post" every day in October. You can see my past October posts here.

(Note: If you're not on LiveJournal and can't vote via the ticky-boxes, you're welcome to leave a comment!)

[Poll #1859646]

Thanks for your feedback!

Poll Time!

Jan. 18th, 2012 09:29 am
eldritchhobbit: (Dracula/Gorey)
Happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] astromachy and [livejournal.com profile] manonlechat, and happy early birthday to [livejournal.com profile] shalna, [livejournal.com profile] estellye, [livejournal.com profile] sithdragn, [livejournal.com profile] reynardine, [livejournal.com profile] arisbe, [livejournal.com profile] dirtwitch, and [livejournal.com profile] dominique012. May all of you enjoy a wonderful day and a fantastic year to come!


The Horror Writers Association has announced the nominees for the Bram Stoker Vampire Novel of the Century Award. The six finalists for "Vampire Novel of the Century" are as follows: The Soft Whisper of the Dead by Charles L. Grant (1983), Salem’s Lot by Stephen King (1975), I Am Legend by Richard Matheson (1954), Anno Dracula by Kim Newman (1992), Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice (1976), and Hotel Transylvania by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro (1978).

Most of my gothic reading predates this past century, so of these titles, I'm sorry to say I've read only one: I Am Legend, which I absolutely love (and highly recommend). Anno Dracula has been on my "to read" list for some time, so I think I'll move it to the top of the pile. As for titles not listed, I do remember quite liking Barbara Hambly's Those Who Hunt the Night (1988), but I'm not certain that it's "best of the century" material. I also thoroughly enjoyed Elizabeth Kostova's The Historian (2000), although it qualifies as a 20th-century work only by the skin of its (pointed) teeth.

Once I saw this list, I was anxious to hear what you thought, my clever and well-read friends. So I ask...


[Poll #1811840]


"There are such beings as vampires, some of us have evidence that they exist. Even had we not the proof of our own unhappy experience, the teachings and the records of the past give proof enough for sane peoples."
- Bram Stoker, Dracula
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween)
Today is August 1 - or, as I like to think of it, the day that marks only two months until October. Since I'm the anal, pre-planning sort, and I have an action-packed fall season before me, I thought I'd look ahead and post this poll.

FYI, for those of you who don't know, for the last five years I've had a tradition of turning this blog into a month-long celebration of Halloween, posting a "spooky post" every day in October. You can see my past October posts here.

(Note: If you're not on LiveJournal and can't vote via the ticky-boxes, you're welcome to leave a comment!)


[Poll #1766089]

Thanks for participating!
eldritchhobbit: (Dr. Who - Smith)
Previously, I asked about your favorite Doctors of Doctor Who. (I've left the poll open, in case you want to change/add your answers.)

We're currently going back and (re)watching the DVDs for each of the Doctors from Doctor Who in chronological order. This leads me to a new question for my friends...


Which episodes/arcs are your favorites for each of the Doctors? (I'm not counting Eight/Paul McGann, because there's only one option for him, the television movie.) Thanks for sharing your picks! Please feel free to respond to as many/few of the Doctors as you wish.

[Poll #1760419]


Barbara: Well, maybe we're going to see a new side to the Doctor.

Ian: Yeah, well, he isn't getting any younger, is he? You know, it's the first time he's been asleep during a landing. Barbara, I've got an idea he's getting a bit...

The Doctor: Remember, I can hear what you're saying.

- Doctor Who, "The Rescue"
eldritchhobbit: (Equilibrium)
Hahaha! I've been quoted on Tumblr. Even though it's a snarky fandom comment, I'll own it, anyway. Proof that nothing you say online every really dies...

There's a possibility that I may, in fairly short order, need to generate a list of my top ten choices for a "The Best Time Travel Stories" (at this point, including both novels and short fiction, although I might limit myself to novels if I get too overwhelmed).

I don't want to forget anything crucial!

Ideally, I'd like them to be both excellent and important. Several immediately come to mind, of course, such as...

The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
The Door Into Summer by Robert Heinlein (I'd choose this over "All You Zombies," but only by a hair.)
The Doomsday Book by Connie Willis
The Company Series by Kage Baker (No, I'm not above cheating and counting a series as a single work. Shameless, I am.)

Some of my other favorites (such as Daphne du Maurier's The House on the Strand) I'll have to think over, and others of the usual suspects (such as Mark Twain's "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court") are so very obvious, I'll have to think them over, too. And what about Madeleine L'Engle's Time Quintet? After all, I've reread A Swiftly Tilting Planet more than any of these works, with the exception only of The Time Machine...

What say you, my brilliant friends? What would be on your list?

[Poll #1752786]

Thanks in advance for your suggestions!


"But what minutes! Count them by sensation, and not by calendars, and each moment is a day."
~ Benjamin Disraeli
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween)
[Poll #1634469]

Pictures are welcome in the comments section, too!


And now back to our regularly scheduled countdown…

Text of the Day: I hope you enjoy "Lady Button-Eyes" by Eugene Field (1850-1895). Does this make anyone else think of Neil Gaiman's Coraline?

When the busy day is done,
And my weary little one
Rocketh gently to and fro;
When the night winds softly blow,
And the crickets in the glen
Chirp and chirp and chirp again;
When upon the haunted green
Fairies dance around their queen—
Then from yonder misty skies
Cometh Lady Button-Eyes.

Through the murk and mist and gloam
To our quiet, cozy home,
Where to singing, sweet and low,
Rocks a cradle to and fro;
Where the clock’s dull monotone
Telleth of the day that’s done;
Where the moonbeams hover o’er
Playthings sleeping on the floor—
Where my weary wee one lies
Cometh Lady Button-Eyes.

Cometh like a fleeting ghost )
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween)

I've been thinking about good Halloween films (not necessarily horror movies, and definitely not lame slasher pictures, but suspenseful, atmospheric films that put a chill up the spine) that are "off the beaten path" -- that is, films that are independent, foreign, direct to DVD, or somehow under promoted, and thus might easily slip under the proverbial radar.

For example, we recently watched the 2009 Gothic film Dorian Gray, which I believe was never widely released in theaters in the U.S. I thought it was quite well done, true to the spirit if not the letter of Oscar Wilde's story, admirably restrained with the special effects, and graced by compelling performances by Ben Barnes, Colin Firth, and Rachel Hurd-Wood. It's perfect for the Halloween season, to my way of thinking. Here's the trailer:



Last year for Halloween we watched 2008's The Burrowers, an independent science fiction/horror Western that was short on cheap gore and long on psychological terror (just the way I like it), and we thoroughly enjoyed every minute of it. Here's the trailer:



Some of the other recent "off the beaten path" films that I find chilling enough for the season include the following:
  • the Finnish historical fantasy/horror/morality play Sauna (2008 - thanks to [livejournal.com profile] mr_earbrass for the recommendation),

  • the surreal dark fantasy Franklyn (2008),

  • the chilling, true crime-inspired Borderland (2007),

  • the Spanish science fiction thriller Timecrimes (2007),

  • the moody, Lovecraft-inspired Cthulhu (2007),

  • the gorgeous, silent Lovecraft adaptation The Call of Cthulhu (2005),

  • the U.S. Civil War-era dark fantasy/horror Dead Birds (2004),

  • and the dystopian psychological thriller Final (2001).

Your mileage, of course, may vary.

Your turn!
[Poll #1630581]


Text of the Day: Do you have the Tuesday blues? I have the solution for you: the short story "Vampires of Venus" by Anthony Pelcher (1897-1981). Why? Because it has vampires. On Venus.

Teaser: Leslie Larner, an entomologist borrowed from the Earth, pits himself against the night-flying vampires that are ravaging the inhabitants of Venus.

Read the complete story here.
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween)

Sunday is August 1, or, as I like to think of it, the day that marks only two months until October. Since I'm the anal, pre-planning sort, and I have a somewhat crazy fall season ahead, I thought I'd get a head start and post this poll early.

FYI, for those of you who don't know, for the last five years I've had a tradition of turning this blog into a month-long celebration of Halloween, making a "spooky post" every day in October. You can see my past October posts here.

(Note: If you're not on LiveJournal and can't vote via the ticky-boxes, you're welcome to leave a comment!)

[Poll #1599240]

Thanks for participating!
eldritchhobbit: (Excalibur/Arthur)
[Poll #1577133]


"I have often thought that in the hereafter of our lives, when I owe no more to the future and can be just a man, that we may meet, and you will come to me and claim me as yours, and know that I am your husband. It is a dream I have..."
- Arthur, Excalibur
eldritchhobbit: (Medieval reader)

The students at the IHS seminar are wonderful, and I had great fun with my lecture.


Now I have a few quick links to share:

* Man from U.N.C.L.E. fans, unite! Napoleon and Illya have made it to the final round of Mister 8's spy face-off poll. No registration is needed: lend your vote to The Man From U.N.C.L.E. here!

* The May 28th episode of the Point of Inquiry podcast is devoted to an interview of H.P. Lovecraft scholar S.T. Joshi.

* Here's another "must read" essay on Lost: "Genre and Lost" by Michael A. Burstein.

* Geeky Clean has some new geeky products, including soaps inspired by Lost and The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.


And now to my question for you...

One of my colleagues recently asked me which books I would consider to be the ten most important autobiographies of all time (drawn from all ages, all cultures). He's taking a poll. A few came to mind instantly: Booker T. Washington's Up From Slavery, Leonard Peltier's Prison Writings: My Life is My Sun Dance, and Augustine's Confessions, for example. But "of all time" is a daunting concept, and I know there are many important titles that I'll think of, if at all, only after I've given him my list. So, knowing that my friends are very wise, I thought I'd ask you for your picks.

[Poll #1572957]

Thanks so much for your thoughts!


"...I would permit no man, no matter what his colour might be, to narrow and degrade my soul by making me hate him."
— Booker T. Washington, Up from Slavery
eldritchhobbit: (Dr. Who - Smith)
[Poll #1557393]

"I'm the Doctor; I'm worse than everyone's aunt."
- Doctor Who, "The Eleventh Hour"
eldritchhobbit: (Halloween)
[Poll #1476064]

Here's my top five list of favorite zombie films:

Night of the Living Dead (1968)
Shaun of the Dead (2004)
28 Days Later (2002)
I Walked with a Zombie (1943)
Re-Animator (1985)
(I'm not counting The Last Man on Earth from 1964, which I absolutely love, because technically those shuffling creatures are vampires, not zombies. So there.)


* For a multimedia exploration of the zombie menace, check out The Zombie Influx Project.


* In honor of National Zombie Day, I offer you two YouTube classics that are always worth revisiting. First, here's Jonathan Coulton's "Re: Your Brains:



And, of course, some Zombie Haiku:




Spooky Text of the Day: For some zombie-appropriate reading, we need look no further than the man himself, H.P. Lovecraft, and his 1925 story "In the Vault."

Excerpt:
There is nothing more absurd, as I view it, than that conventional association of the homely and the wholesome which seems to pervade the psychology of the multitude. Mention a bucolic Yankee setting, a bungling and thick-fibred village undertaker, and a careless mishap in a tomb, and no average reader can be brought to expect more than a hearty albeit grotesque phase of comedy. God knows, though, that the prosy tale which George Birch’s death permits me to tell has in it aspects beside which some of our darkest tragedies are light.

Read the complete story here.

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