eldritchhobbit: (Cabin Pressure/Don't Tread)
Blech! Very sick here. So many are! The ick is making the rounds. 'Tis the season, I suppose. My husband is two weeks into it and he still has little voice and lots of coughing. I'm just in week one, full of antibiotics. Joy! /Whinging

I hope all of you are well, my friends!

Here are several cool Calls for Papers for anyone so inclined:
* "Special Edition of Fantastika Journal" (incorporates the genres of fantasy, science fiction, and horror, but can also include alternative histories, steampunk, young adult fiction, or any other imaginative space)
* "Representing Rural Women"
* "Stranger Things: Eighties Nostalgia, Cynicism and Innocence"
* "Science Fiction Beyond the Western Canon"

Most of all, I just want to share the news about an amazing and inspiring project created by StarShipSofa's Districts of Wonders network, one I'm deeply honored to be a part of: Everyone: Worlds Without Walls, a speculative fiction anthology of new and diverse voices from around the globe. I invite you to check it out!

eldritchhobbit: (Books and text)
Happy birthday to Ray Bradbury (22 August, 1920 – 5 June, 2012)!

"They began by controlling books of cartoons and then detective books and, of course, films, one way or another, one group or another, political bias, religious prejudice, union pressures; there was always a minority afraid of something, and a great majority afraid of the dark, afraid of the future, afraid of the past, afraid of the present, afraid of themselves and shadows of themselves."
- Ray Bradbury, "Usher II" (1950)

R.I.P. Ray Bradbury
eldritchhobbit: (Lovecraftian)
Happy birthday to H.P. Lovecraft (20 August, 1890 – 15 March, 1937)!

Lovecraft


Take my virtual walking tour of Lovecraft's Providence.

"The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown."
- H.P. Lovecraft, "Supernatural Horror in Literature" (19
eldritchhobbit: (Knight)
Recently Gary Dowell, editor of the wonderful Far Fetched Fables: The Audio Fantasy Fiction Magazine (sibling to StarShipSofa), invited me to contribute a fantasy-related "Looking Back on Genre History" to his podcast. It occurred to me that this was the perfect opportunity to share with everyone an almost-but-not-quite-lost work of epic Gothic fantasy: 1877's The Demon of Brockenheim; or The Enchanted Ring.

Today the second part of my two two-part introduction to The Demon of Brockenheim was posted on Far Fetched Fables. You can listen to both parts for free below.
* My Introduction to The Demon of Brockenheim, Part 1
* My Introduction to The Demon of Brockenheim, Part 2

And here for your reading pleasure is a free PDF of the novel from its publication in serial form in The Australian Journal: download The Demon of Brockenheim.

Happy listening and happy reading!



If you'd like to get your genre geek on a bit more, here are some suggestions.

Bibliography/Recommended Further Reading Related to My Demon of Brockenheim "Looking Back" Segments
- Anonymous. The Saga of the Volsungs. Jesse Byock, ed. Penguin Classics, 2000.
- Doig, James, ed. Australian Gothic : An Anthology of Australian Supernatural Fiction, 1867-1939. Equilibrium Books, 2007.
- Ellis, Markman. The History of Gothic Fiction. Edinburgh University Press, 2001.
- Fouqué, Baron de la Motte. The Magic Ring. Amy H. Sturgis, ed. Valancourt Books, 2006.
- Gelder, Kenneth and Rachael Weaver, eds. The Anthology of Colonial Australian Gothic Fiction. Melbourne University Press, 2007.
- Johnson-Woods, Toni. Beyond Ephemera: The Australian Journal (1865-1962) as Fiction Publisher. Diss. University of Queensland, 2000.
- Punter. David. The Literature of Terror: A History of Gothic Fictions from 1765 to the Present Day. Volume I: The Gothic Tradition. Longmans, 1980.
- Punter, David and Glennis Byron. The Gothic. Blackwell, 2004.
- Thomsett, Michael T. The Inquisition: A History. McFarland, 2010.
- Tolkien, J.R.R. The Lord of the Rings. Allen & Unwin. 1954, 1955.
- Yates, Frances A. The Rosicrucian Enlightenment. Routledge, 2001.
eldritchhobbit: (Knight)
Recently Gary Dowell, editor of the wonderful Far Fetched Fables: The Audio Fantasy Fiction Magazine (sibling to StarShipSofa), invited me to contribute a fantasy-related "Looking Back on Genre History" to his podcast. It occurred to me that this was the perfect opportunity to share with everyone an almost-but-not-quite-lost work of epic Gothic fantasy: 1877's The Demon of Brockenheim; or The Enchanted Ring.

You can hear Part 1 of my two-part introduction to The Demon of Brockenheim here for free on Far Fetched Fables. Part 2 will be available next week, and I will post the link when it is.

And here for your reading pleasure is a free PDF of the novel from its publication in serial form in The Australian Journal: download The Demon of Brockenheim.

Happy listening and happy reading!



If you'd like to get your genre geek on a bit more, here are some suggestions.

Bibliography/Recommended Further Reading Related to My Demon of Brockenheim "Looking Back" Segments
- Anonymous. The Saga of the Volsungs. Jesse Byock, ed. Penguin Classics, 2000.
- Doig, James, ed. Australian Gothic : An Anthology of Australian Supernatural Fiction, 1867-1939. Equilibrium Books, 2007.
- Ellis, Markman. The History of Gothic Fiction. Edinburgh University Press, 2001.
- Fouqué, Baron de la Motte. The Magic Ring. Amy H. Sturgis, ed. Valancourt Books, 2006.
- Gelder, Kenneth and Rachael Weaver, eds. The Anthology of Colonial Australian Gothic Fiction. Melbourne University Press, 2007.
- Johnson-Woods, Toni. Beyond Ephemera: The Australian Journal (1865-1962) as Fiction Publisher. Diss. University of Queensland, 2000.
- Punter. David. The Literature of Terror: A History of Gothic Fictions from 1765 to the Present Day. Volume I: The Gothic Tradition. Longmans, 1980.
- Punter, David and Glennis Byron. The Gothic. Blackwell, 2004.
- Thomsett, Michael T. The Inquisition: A History. McFarland, 2010.
- Tolkien, J.R.R. The Lord of the Rings. Allen & Unwin. 1954, 1955.
- Yates, Frances A. The Rosicrucian Enlightenment. Routledge, 2001.
eldritchhobbit: (Lovecraftian)
Happy birthday to H.P. Lovecraft (20 August, 1890 – 15 March, 1937)!

Lovecraft


Take my virtual walking tour of Lovecraft's Providence.

"The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown."
- H.P. Lovecraft, "Supernatural Horror in Literature" (1927)
eldritchhobbit: (HP/Snape/Tori)
Curtis Weyant, who is both an all-around terrific guy and my former graduate student, addresses Michael Moorcock's (in)famous "Epic Pooh" essay and its assertions about J.R.R. Tolkien's work in his latest blog post.

And now, here are the most important film scenes about Severus Snape - in chronological order. Watch this. For reasons.

eldritchhobbit: (Headstone/wings)
Happy birthday to J. Sheridan Le Fanu (August 28, 1814 – February 7, 1873)!

Carmilla by J. Sheridan Le Fanu


“Thus fortified I might take my rest in peace. But dreams come through stone walls, light up dark rooms, or darken light ones, and their persons make their exists and their entrances as they please, and laugh at locksmiths.”

- J. Sheridan Le Fanu, Carmilla (1871)
eldritchhobbit: (HP/RonHermione/Freshmen)
Looking ahead to a class discussion of wizard rock (or "wrock"), I was pleased to see that the We Are Wizards documentary is now available on YouTube. There are also trailers and clips from The Wizard Rockumentary: A Movie About Rocking and Rowling on the official website.


FYI, if you're in the mood for some "retail therapy"...

* My awesome sister (you know, the tornado chaser) has opened "Thunder and Lightning," a KitsyLane jewelry and accessories boutique, so I invite you to check it out. In addition, her Etsy shop is Stormy Sky Designs. Yay!

* Peadar Ó Guilín's brilliant Bone World Trilogy is now complete with the new release of The Volunteer. Don't miss the dystopian goodness.

* Speaking of science fiction series, Jeff Carlson now has a sequel to his thriller The Frozen Sky. Betrayed is "Vonnie vs. the sunfish"; who can say no to that?

* I was sad to hear that Strange Chemistry is closing its doors. If you're interested in any Strange Chemistry book titles, this would be a good time to get them! I recommend the YA steampunk Emilie duology (Emilie and the Hollow World and Emilie and the Sky World) by Martha Wells.


Last but not least, I finally chose new glasses. Dark blue in front and bronzey-gold on the sides, they're bookverse Ravenclaw house colors, so they had to be mine! Nerdhood rocks!

Pics or it didn't happen. )
eldritchhobbit: (LOTR/Emo Hobbit)
Just a quick fly-by post...

This is worth reading: "J.R.R. Tolkien Has A Touching Message For His Former Teachers In Newly Discovered Letter."

This also deserves a look: from NPR, "Harry Potter And The Forbidden Books."

J.R.R. Tolkien's dust jacket painting for The Hobbit
eldritchhobbit: (Combs/Frighteners)
Ruth Graham started it with her article at Slate: "Against YA: Read whatever you want. But you should feel embarrassed when what you’re reading was written for children." Graham manages to diss not only all of YA fiction, but also fantasy, science fiction, and detective fiction, as well, in favor of big-L Literature.


One of my favorite contemporary authors, Lyndsay Faye, has just responded with a wickedly tongue-in-cheek "thank you": "Slate Nailed It: YA and Detective Fiction Are for Rubes."

Faye's reply is well worth reading for insightful sarcasm like this:
"In a knockout left hook of an argument that left me reeling at Graham’s perspicacity, she later suggests, 'the YA and "new adult" boom may mean fewer teens aspire to grown-up reading, because the grown-ups they know are reading their books.' This is not merely true of adults reading Harry Potter, a terrible series touching on love, bravery, ultimate self-sacrifice, and a truly unambiguous, almost cartoonish character named Severus Snape; it is likewise true of detective fiction. When I was very young, I read The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes at the behest of my dad, who loved The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. My father’s unabashed admiration for the works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle would have stunted my capacity to comprehend literary fiction, razing my intellect like a nuclear winter, had a half-bespectacled, elbow-patched stranger not bashed me over the head with a first edition Finnegan’s Wake when I was a nubile sixteen years of age. If not for this vigilante illuminati (they have capes, and a lair), I would not now have To the Lighthouse and Beloved open at either elbow so I can read them simultaneously in my periphery while writing this article in praise of 'Against YA.'"

Books, again.


* Nope, me neither.
eldritchhobbit: (TOS/Banned from Argo)
My resistance was futile!


ConCarolinas is coming up this weekend! George R.R. Martin is the guest of honor, and the organizers are expecting quite a crowd. I understand registration for Saturday is completely sold out!

I'll be an author-scholar guest on the following panels:

Saturday
9am: Breakfast and Books
10am: I Am SHERLocked (I'm also moderating this panel.)

Sunday
12pm: The Hobbit Movies
1:30pm: The Hunger Games

I hope to see some of you there!

And speaking of parties, happy birthday to [livejournal.com profile] gondoriangirl, and happy early birthday to [livejournal.com profile] vivien529, [livejournal.com profile] senket, [livejournal.com profile] chorale, [livejournal.com profile] nakeisha, [livejournal.com profile] poenari, [livejournal.com profile] ebonange, [livejournal.com profile] primroseburrows, [livejournal.com profile] gbsteve, [livejournal.com profile] eowynmaiar, [livejournal.com profile] sally_maria, [livejournal.com profile] magicwondershow, [livejournal.com profile] groovekittie, [livejournal.com profile] eveningblue, [livejournal.com profile] peadarog, [livejournal.com profile] thehornedgod, [livejournal.com profile] baylorsr, [livejournal.com profile] lin4gondor, [livejournal.com profile] caitri, [livejournal.com profile] belleferret, [livejournal.com profile] valancourtbooks, [livejournal.com profile] potboy, [livejournal.com profile] alex_beecroft, [livejournal.com profile] nurdbunny, [livejournal.com profile] lisa_marli, [livejournal.com profile] graashoppa, [livejournal.com profile] toddlyles, and [livejournal.com profile] pktheater. May you enjoy many happy returns of the day, my friends!
eldritchhobbit: (Excalibur/Arthur)
* R.I.P., Mary Stewart (17 September, 1916 – 9 May, 2014), best known for her Merlin series of Arthurian fantasy novels: Mythopoeic Award winners The Crystal Cave (1970) and The Hollow Hills (1973), followed by The Last Enchantment. Read more from The New York Times: "Mary Stewart, British Writer Who Spanned Genres, Dies at 97."

* Is Tolkien's translation of Beowulf better than Seamus Heaney's? From Katy Waldman at Slate: "The Don’s Don: J.R.R. Tolkien’s Beowulf translation finally arrives."

* I should mention again that scholar Michael Drout has written a most enlightening blog post clarifying his work with Tolkien's Beowulf papers, etc.: "Tolkien's Beowulf: The Real Story."


And here's some amazing street art, a tribute to The Professionals.

The Professionals ~ Gatecrasher Fence
eldritchhobbit: (Millennium/Worry)
To follow up on my last post, I wanted to share my updated select bibliography of sources on YA dystopian literature. Online sources include links. If you know of something that should be here and isn't, please give me a shout! Thanks.

My working list of English-language YA dystopian novels can be found here using my "YA dystopias list" tag.

--Secondary Sources Relating to Young Adult Dystopias, A Select Bibliography )
eldritchhobbit: (Ripper/suspicion)
Happy birthday to Robert Bloch (5 April, 1917 – 23 September, 1994), one of the youngest members of the Lovecraft Circle.

bloch ripper


“I think perhaps all of us go a little crazy at times.”
― Robert Bloch, Psycho (1959)

"In the strict scientific sense, Doctor, we all feed on death. Even vegetarians."
― Mr. Spock to Dr. McCoy in Robert Bloch's episode "The Wolf in the Fold," Star Trek (1967)

“So much for modern science and its wonderful discoveries that just about everything can kill you. Life is only a bedtime story before a long, long sleep.”
― Robert Bloch, Lori (1989)
eldritchhobbit: (Lovecraftian)
Some time ago I was invited to write the introduction for a collection of Lovecraft's favorite tales. The project eventually died before it could be born, leaving me with this essay. I wanted to put it up somewhere in its original form, so here it is.

The H.P. Lovecraft Memorial Plaque 2


'Art in Its Most Essential Sense': H.P. Lovecraft and the Imaginative Tale )
eldritchhobbit: (illuminated manuscript)
As you know, the devastating tornadoes in Oklahoma earlier this year hit very close to home for me, as in fact they hit the counties (turned "national disaster areas") where my parents and my sister and her family live. Efforts continue to rebuild and recover.

I am thrilled to be a part of the new Writers for Relief: An Anthology Written by Fantasy's Finest to Benefit Those Who Suffered in Oklahoma, edited by Davey Beauchamp and Stuart Jaffe. All proceeds benefit the ongoing recovery efforts related to the Oklahoma tornado disasters. This collection includes cover art from the legendary Bob Eggleton and fiction from some of the finest in the genre, including Kevin J. Anderson, Mike Resnick, Ben Bova, Todd McCaffrey, Stephen Euin Cobb, Jason Sandford, Bobby Nash, John Hartness, Edmund Schubert, Danny Birt, Jaym Gates, Gray Rinehart, Janine Spendlove, and Eugie Foster. Oh, and I'm in there, too! :)

Writers for Relief cover art


Hey, this would make a great gift, wouldn't it? And it's almost time for the holidays! I'd be grateful if you'd help us spread the word. Thanks so much!

Writers for Relief 3 flyer
eldritchhobbit: (Default)
My Spring 2014 online, interactive, international course for The Mythgard Institute (available both for M.A. students who are seeking degrees and auditors wishing to participate the love of the subject) is now open for registration. It's "The Gothic Tradition."

The Gothic Tradition at Mythgard Institute

Here is the class description: The Gothic literary tradition began in the mid-eighteenth century in Europe and lives on in various forms across the globe through contemporary fiction, poetry, art, music, film, and television. Mad scientists, blasted heaths, abandoned ruins, elusive ghosts, charming vampires, and even little green men people its stories. With ingredients such as a highly developed sense of atmosphere, extreme emotions including fear and awe, and emphases on the mysterious and the paranormal, Gothic works tend to express anxieties about social, political, religious, and economic issues of the time, as well as rejection of prevailing modes of thought and behavior. This course will investigate the fascinating and subversive Gothic imagination (from the haunted castles of Horace Walpole to the threatening aliens of H.P. Lovecraft, from Dracula to Coraline), identify the historical conditions that have inspired it, consider how it has developed across time and place and medium, and explore how it has left its indelible imprint on the modern genres of science fiction and fantasy.

Here is the class trailer.



For more information, check out the course page here.
eldritchhobbit: (Holmes/Impudence)
Fresh from Wildside Press, the new Sherlock Holmes Mystery Magazine #10 includes my essay "Sherlock Holmes and Science Fiction."

Sherlock Holmes Mystery Magazine #10 (October 2013)

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